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26

You just got introduced to bots :) Looks like you are running a vanilla version of software like phpBB or WordPress etc. What are bots? (Source: Wikipedia) Bots are an army of (mostly compromised) machines doing whatever their bot head asks them to do. In most cases, they just post spam messages with links. Read more about the command and control ...


18

Another way of asking your question is: "How many users had at least one download during this time period?" You can use "segments" to answer this question. Create a segment only for users that have a "download" event. Select the "Audience Overview" report Change the main metric dropdown from "Sessions" to "Users" Click "+ Add Segment" Click "+ New ...


4

For the most part, Google doesn't really care how you structure your URLs (as long as they're reasonably stable & crawlable; with the exception of country-targeting). Think about what you'd want out of your URL structure instead: need to do country-targeting? Use subdomains or high-level folders, e.g., uk.domain.com/... , domain.com/uk/... (this is the ...


4

Here is a visualization of the number of links on the homepages of top 98 webpages. Very few have less than 100, and many have 500 or more. Google used to recommend that any page have no more than 100 links per page. However, they removed the "100 links per page" from the webmaster guidelines some time ago. Matt Cutts released a video where he says that ...


4

Yes, you could use the Person type. For a dedicated user profile page (i.e., one user per page), you could use the ProfilePage type: <body itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ProfilePage"> <div itemprop="about mainEntity" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Person"> </div> </body>


4

About Users calculation: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2992042?hl=en But the most important is a part: It relies on number of sessions and client-side time, so if a user's client-side time is incorrect, or if you are using a reporting view that filters out some sessions from a user (instead of all users), the data can be inconsistent. So ...


4

Sometimes Google Analytics metrics can be tricky to understand, but there are a few places where you can get more info about it, namely: Google Analytics Developers API Analytics Help - Metrics and Dimentions, here Directly replying to your question, here's what you'll want to know while quoting this article here: User: The total number of users for the ...


4

Assuming twitter.com/myusername becomes a Not Found page - search engines don't like lots of broken links, which is why many websites prevent (or limit) username changes. For example, Google gives every website a "crawl budget" - if Google finds lots of broken links (from old usernames), it won't crawl as many of the live pages, and so therefore might not ...


3

It shouldn't be a problem from Google's point of view. They allow ads behind a login, even when that content isn't publicly available at all. From the AdSense ad placement policies: Ads on pages behind a login Publishers are welcome to place Google ads on password-protected pages as long as those pages comply with our program policies. When applying for ...


3

When having the username at the beginning of the path, you would have to make sure to avoid name clashes with non-user pages (and, for sites that allow custom templates and forms, phishing potentials), and you lose some usability. Examples: Reserved filenames: A user could choose the username robots.txt, favicon.png, .well-known, etc. Internal pages: Your ...


3

SEO value is not affected by dashes - the search engines ignore them. But from a user perspective, dashes can make a domain look spammy. Many spammy, exact-match domains have used dashes so they have sort of "poisoned the well". From Moz.com: Top Tips - Word Separators: Avoid hyphens. Hyphens detract from credibility and can act as a spam indicator. ...


3

A user is identified by a long term cookie. A user is typically a person on a particular device. The same person would not become a new new user unless they switched devices (tablet to phone to computer, etc), switched browsers, entered private browsing, or cleared their cookies. Two people would usually not be identified as the same user unless they ...


3

Depending on what cookie you mean exactly, 2 years would probably be the answer you're looking for based on this source: https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/analyticsjs/cookie-usage Additional details Google itself lists three main cookies that are set by the analytics script: "_ga" with a lifetime of "2 years" that is "Used to ...


3

I'm no lawyer, but under the current UK Data Protection Act, personal data is broadly defined as: "any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person ('data subject'); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number,...


2

If your website is hosting a forum or a blog that allows comments to articles you've posted and you allow registrations and postings without some mechanism for verifying the registrations are coming from a human rather than an automated script, you will likely get an enormous amount of spam posted on your site, since there are many systems out there on the ...


2

Ideal would probably be 50. 100 works too if you want to go on the higher side. Taking your points one at a time: UX: Unless I misunderstood how this website is to be used, a search feature would be much more useful than a list of IP addresses. That way, people can look up the domain or IP of any websites that they have had issues with. However, maybe if ...


2

You could use an email confirmation link with a 15+ minute delay on register. May deter some users, but would prevent some throw away email services.


2

Nope, nope and nope. Why would someone put a child pornography into a service that sole purpose is content analysis? It wouldn't go through. But, srsly, don't go on that road. It's illegal content, so you got your answer in the word ILLEGAL. And I think that I don't need to remind you how community is sensitive in this particular case.


2

You can solve this by creating a new segment in Google Analytics. In the segment you go to Advanced and pick Conditions. Now you create a filter. In the drop down pick "Count of Sessions" and then you choose >= 5. This will filter out users with 5 or more sessions for the current date range you have selected. Give the Segment a good name and save it. ...


2

The hostname report in Google Analytics is about the server's hostname, it's the hostname where the GA tracking code was run, which is why you should see your own hostname. Google Analytics does not report on the visitors's IP or hostname due to privacy policy. https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2763052


2

There are a few things to know to understand the User numbers. A "User" is determined by a cookie set by GA. Two people sharing a computer and using the same browser will count as one User, and conversely one person using two different browsers/devices, or clearing their cookies between two visits, will count as two Users. If visitors are typically logged ...


2

I don't think that is possible via real time reports. Real time reporting offers a limited set of data and standard ga segments do not work with real time reporting. To see what is offered by the real time reporting, more specific information can be found on the following page https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1638637?hl=en&ref_topic=1638563 ...


1

Usually they've also forgotten their password. So, the question is really... "How can you reset a user's password when they don't have access to their email?" In short, you're going to need a lot more information from the user and consequently will need the user to have previously entered this information into their account during signup. Alternative ...


1

The most secure thing to do in this instance is to prevent these temporary user accounts from having sudo access on the server. If they are able to upload a PHP file to the server and run it through their browser then this is a greater security hole than you may realise. On the first hand the server could be misconfigured to run PHP files as the user who ...


1

In https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2956047?hl=en&ref_topic=1012046 are well explained two scenarios where users are more than sessions count in a Google Analytics custom report: SCENARIO 1 Session 1: User enters to Page A User navigates to Page B User navigates back to Page A End of session Session 2: ...


1

As much as this idea is interesting, I'd have to say no. The reason is because we have to look at every device in existence, and since desktops are still in use today, one could still have a very old computer and use the old-fashioned lynx web browser to browse web pages, and I'm pretty sure in that browser you'll have a hard time detecting mouse movements. ...


1

Simply state that it is your legal and ethical duty to uphold the integrity of your company by not affiliating yourself either directly or indirectly with any form of illegal activity (child pornography is illegal no matter where in the world you are). Refuse his business, if he's provided you with an email address or you have his IP address or anything of ...


1

My primary concerns are UX, download speed, and lastly, Gaggle. oops... I meant giigle, or maybe googoogaagaagle. Ok, back to the real issues. To me, I think having a ridiculously huge number of links on a single page may cause a slight slowdown because when a robot scans a page, every single byte is downloaded from the server, and each minimally-crafted ...


1

Wait: are you storing username info in your analytics so you can track and visualize behavior of specific people? If yes: you are violating Google's TOS. And you should erase your Google Analytics property data. Not just the view, but the whole property. That's mandatory (if Google catch you do that, it's even worse). The only way you can track logged in ...


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