15

Possible advantages of having visible feed links: For visitors that know what feeds are: If they (currently) don’t use a user agent with feed autodiscovery¹, they still get informed that you offer feeds and which URLs they have. If they use a user agent with feed autodiscovery, they might not expect to find a feed on your site (and therefore don’t pay ...


11

I use RSS all the time, and I find RSS buttons on websites very useful. Simple, when I see them, I know website offer RSS, it is more intuitive way to find feeds than checking footer or something else. I usually expect RSS button to be next to social media icons/buttons, or a small/discreet icon with text somewhere in header. I guess some websites do not ...


10

Scrolling is a way of life and you're attempting to fix something that isn't broken If you research UX scrolling you will find plenty of evidence that for a good user experience and to keep people's attention scrolling is actually a good thing, here's just one article of many you can find online regarding scrolling and user experience: Myth #3: People don’t ...


10

I would think neither would make a difference except for preference. Search engines are looking at word boundries (programming term) when parsing a string and would not recognize these characters as either a word nor a part of an HTML tag and likely will ignore them completely. From an SEO perspective, they would likely be totally ignored. [Update] It ...


6

If it’s only colon vs. pipe: Use the pipe. 1. The colon might (more) often be part of the page title. It might be confusing to have two colons. Example for an article called "Top 10: Songs": Example.com: Top 10: Songs It seems as if "Top 10" would be some kind of second-level category here. 2. The site title should come after the page title. The colon ...


4

I don't really use the {link} to get the permalink of a question (I get it from the URL), and usually by this time I have already posted or commented something and the URL looks now like this: http://example.com/123123#annoyingCommentId666 Clicking the title will clean it and make it ready to be copied and shared with no worries of linking to a comment: ...


4

As you said, have a certain amount of links visible, then load more with JS. The first 20 links: <a href="/link-target/">link</a> The subsequent links: <a class="lazy-load" title="/link-target/">link</a> Followed by: $(document).ready(function(){ $("a.lazy-load").attr("src", $(this).attr("title")); }); ...


4

Google doesn't want to index pages of search results. You should have a robots.txt rule that prevents Google from crawling all of your search result pages. If you don't, you run the risk of getting a penalty from Google for showing search result pages in their search results. Linking to pages that are in robots.txt does dilute link juice. I've tested it. ...


4

In my case was a css issue at body (Firefox, Safari not affected by the problem): overflow: auto; After I remove it, it seems to work well.


3

My thoughts from an ecom+blog perspective: You do not need the button itself unless you want to offer something for a user using their eyes, without any helper tools alerting that RSS is available, to click into the feed. IMO the preferred way to alert automation/tools/reader-plugins that a feed is available is to use rel="alternate" link in the <head>...


3

So will a 5 letter domain which is a abbreviation of a long word worth it to register and use as your own domain? No. Well maybe a yes if its a well known abbreviation, but you want to cater your website to your users so you want your domain name to be something people will likely type in when they want to access your website manually. For example: If ...


3

I think it actually makes quite a lot of sense. Here are some cases, were I think this would be usefull: The Title of your side is a heading (e.g. name of the company, should maybe even be the topmost h1). This would be similar to the Logo of your side, and it’s usually convention to link this to the homepage/main url of your site You have a list of posts/...


3

AMP is about making pages load faster so the use case so far is for reading articles / static content only. It will give a slight ranking boost from Feb 2016 but I wouldn't worry just yet. Page speed is a really important factor from a UX point of view though. If you don't have huge resources use AMP if you have static stuff (text/IMG). You should ...


2

A webpage with 500 links is rarely a good SEO optimized page. It's also bad for user experience because it's hard to find the wanted link in the list. A good method would be to divide your webpage into several by classing those links by categories for example. That way, you can obtain several webpages with less links (better for SEO and user experience). ...


2

A terrible idea. Unless the URL is rel="nofollow" and has a really important reason to be in your top of page navigation. Follow up: Part of ranking is the choice of quality/authority OUTBOUND links. If the outbound link is RELEVANT to the page context then it should be a "follow" link but in my view not placed in the top nav area.


2

The four most used notifications are "error", "warning", "success" or "info". (usually colored red, yellow, green and blue) For "error" and "success" we take for granted that the user has started a process on the page before the notification triggered. Thus we can also assume that this notification will never be crawled, no matter how you've implemented it. ...


2

If for no other reason, it lets people know there is a RSS feed. Whether they click on it or not doesn't matter.


2

API endpoints are usually not useful to have in Google Search Results, so the best thing to do would be to block them using robots.txt as you suggested. These API endpoints are not supposed to be viewed directly by an end-user, so usability issues like "viewpoint not set" and "text too small to read" are nonsensical. I'm not sure how Google decided to try ...


2

As Willtech mentioned in his answer, you want to use the path as a way to show various types of categories. The top one, though, should probably be the type of content, opposed to a broad-topic. But that will very much depend on your website. For example, if your site talks about fixing things at home. You may have a set of pages under /fixing/. On the ...


2

Google's official description is: "The font size for the page is too small to be legible and would require mobile visitors to “pinch to zoom” in order to read." This means you should use legible font sizes in order to optimize your text for reading and provide a better user experience when browsing your website on mobile devices.


1

Your URL is the first thing that is required to access your page and is important and easily overlooked. Strictly, a URL should be arranged as follows for any site: http://example.com/broad-topic/sub-topic/specific-topic/page-title.html This allows you, your visitors and, Big Internet Search Engine to deal with your site as a tree. The homepage is the ...


1

I am searching for the solution for the same problem. As you said, It happens when html code generates in JS. Browser doesn't find where to go (because html codes hadn't been generated yet.) and it goes 0,0. I solved the problem with the min-height. I added a min-height value to the body code in CSS. And, this is my first post in StackExchange. :)


1

After all those years, RSS has deescalated. New methods like push notifications dominated the RSS. But it doesn't mean RSS or RSS buttons are not needed anymore. RSS can be used as a mini API to interact with a website's content. I don't think there is any simpler way to do this. In regard to buttons, RSS buttons are the most compact way to notify users ...


1

No, it is not bad, since Google execute Javascript very well from many years ago. I checkout your codepen example, and you're displaying whole content on current page, so Google will index your truncate paragraphs + rest of paragraphs. Actually your example similar to jump-links, so when Googlebot encounter links and click on it, then more content will ...


1

I'd put it in which ever one is going to be easier for you. I wouldn't sweat the bots if you decide HTML is easier. There are ways to mask sections of your page if that is a concern as referenced here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/8821256/how-to-tell-google-bot-to-skip-part-of-html


1

I want to mention that the page-speed insights tool made by Google allows individual pages to be checked for speed and mobile usability and provides results for both desktop and mobile devices. It will provide detail on what you can do to make the site mobile friendly. It may also give a yellow warning message to those sites that might not pass the mobile ...


1

The blocked resources are not generally a problem. These messages are just informational most of the time. These messages are not why your site is deemed to be mobile unfriendly since they are not included in the test. In fact, you can just plain ignore blocked resources unless they are not intended to be blocked. Since you are running WP and these are in /...


1

A solution that I would recommend: Load all the links in an <iframe> and add a rule in your robots.txt to disallow that <iframe>.


1

Using directory will not attract Google penalty but for user point of view its irritating because one might just remove the "name" from URL (www.moviereviews.com/movie/name) to browse the main category will surely give 404. I would suggest that you should redirect the URL www.moviereviews.com/movie to some relevant page to make sure it does not pass 404 to ...


1

I think it makes sense to use the folder movie (or something like that) in your URLs. It works as a prefix so that there can be no conflicts with other URLs on the site. If you’d use no folder, think what happens if someone makes a movie titled robots.txt ;-) or more likely contact etc. Search engines won’t penalize you if the hierarchical parts of URLs are ...


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