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5

This certainly looks like a mistyped URL in the links on pages /blog/page/12/, /blog/page/13/ and /blog/page/14/. On those pages look for a link like the following: <a href='’https://go.example.com/20190620-Lyft-Livestream.html?ref=blog'>Link</a> The erroneous single back curly quote ’ at the start of the URL will trigger the user-agent (...


4

If you correctly put in 301 redirects and update your sitemap, the site will be fine. However... What are you trying to gain from this change? The Stack Exchange-style hierarchy doesn't make sense for what it seems you're trying to accomplish (a Wikipedia-style website?). What you currently have makes more sense in terms of organizing the information: ...


4

This question popped up first, of course, when I googled up "URL safe characters", as most people would. I think it's worthy to put up a straightforward answer to a concise question. From the horse's— ugh, RFC2396— I mean, Sir Timothy's mouth: 2.3. Unreserved Characters Data characters that are allowed in a URI but do not have a reserved purpose are ...


3

You're right that it's tracking only the final page, but it doesn't mean your funnel is broken. You've run into an aspect of Google Analytics that is confusingly named. "Required" in a destination goal funnel does not mean "required for the goal to convert", it only means "required for the conversion to show in the Conversions > Goals > Funnel Visualization ...


3

There is a risk with URL changes of SEO problems, ranking loss, and traffic declines. When correctly implemented with 301 redirects, it can go perfectly fine, but it doesn't always do so. I recommend changing URLs only when there is an overwhelming need. If you do want to change URLs you should consider gentler changes as well: Chang the URL structure ...


3

This is not possible without the help of a third party tool/spider/bot that has already crawled these redirects and stored this information (eg. a search engine). At www.example.com you have no way of knowing whether the request arrived via a redirection from example.redirect, since the request comes from the client's machine (user-agent) not example....


2

As has already been mentioned in @closetnoc's answer, the proposed new URL format is preferable to the old one using a .php extension. However, the real question I think here is whether you should "change" the existing URL structure. There is no direct SEO benefit of changing the URL. There is an inherent SEO risk in changing any URL structure. (Google ...


2

To answer your question, language-specific domain is one way to tell google certain pages are relevant for visitors with particular language or country. Thus for SEO purpose, google will only rank those specified pages to your targeted market visitors. In your case, your Korean users will only see its Korean version webpages; it helps improves customer ...


2

If your sitemap is being submitted in txt format, then it must have a .txt file extension. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/183668?hl=en


2

URL length does not have much impact on how Googlebot crawls. Changing your URLs will have the biggest effect. Googlebot will forever come back and crawl your old URLs. You will need to implement redirects to the new URLs and maintain those redirects indefinitely. If you change all your URLs, this can significantly increase the number of URLs that ...


2

No, it won't. All you need to focus on is to make things easier for the end-user. Everything else doesn't matter anymore. Google's algorithms are very evolved and what's good for the user is good for robots and ultimately for rankings.


2

RFC 2396 is actually obsolete and was superseded by RFC 3986. The unreserved special characters (safe to use without encoding) (other than letters and digits) are: - . _ and ~


2

You're not applying the canonical link to the directory, but on the page that is served when someone visits that URI. Canonical links are specific to individual pages, so applying one to the directory's index would have no impact on other pages within it.


2

What you are seeing is default behaviour on Apache. when I enter random subdirectories, such as /index.php/asdfghjk /asdfghjk is an additional path-segment in the URL. It's not strictly a "subdirectory". (Directories and subdirectories relate to a filesystem. The URL does not necessarily map directly to the filesystem.) When additional path segments ...


2

but when I copy the url from any element from the page like this for example, It doesn't show Trailing slash in the end. Why? The .htaccess directive you posted doesn't change your HTML source, it simply redirects HTTP requests sent to your server. how to add trailing slash everywhere, not just in the main url search bar You need to edit the HTML source ...


2

See how the Wikipedia handles this: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fu%C3%9Fg%C3%A4ngerbr%C3%BCcke <link rel="canonical" href="https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fu%C3%9Fg%C3%A4ngerbr%C3%BCcke"/>


2

If you are going to change the already existing URL / permalink on an existing website, you can expect a dip in traffic after having to redirect it (301). On the question whether you should do this change or not: that's entirely up to you. If you think that "blog" is meaningful for your users or will improve your SEO keyword matching, there won't be a good ...


2

Slug URLs are a minor ranking factor search engines use when determining a particular page or resource's relevance to a search query. So URLs will give low impact in the ranking. It's just used to identify web pages in a form that is easy to read for the end-user. In my opinion, you should use slug like your page title, so if your page title burning eyes so ...


2

There are two important points around URLs that are relevant: Keywords in the URL don't matter much at all for SEO right now. Having the year in the URL isn't going help you rank better. Stable, unchanging URLs are best for SEO. Having the year in the URL makes you change the URL every year. Having the year in the URL is not good for SEO. This is a ...


2

If you are going to use a slash (/) in your URL, you should have content when the URL is truncated to that point. A slash in the URL commonly represents a directory. Both users and bots often shorten URLs to the slash looking for an index page. An alternative is to use dashes: /post-best_funny_videos-dkKE_wd3jJ. Dashes are not commonly understood to ...


2

This is called Scroll To Text Fragment, and arrived in Chrome 80. Here is the draft specification, and the original proposal. It seems to me that this is another feature that Google just added to Chrome without other browser vendors signaling any interest (like Portals, though that one never graduated from being a flag). Here is an article that calls Scroll ...


1

Can I create a keyword subdirectory for my home page to help SEO? You could, however, this may not help much with SEO. The URL doesn't necessarily help that much with ranking (on page content is what really matters), although it could perhaps help click through rates when users see the URL/keyword in search results. I suspect this requires some ...


1

While Google does recognize that /blog has a special meaning that signals a blog, semantically speaking adding /blog means nothing and adds no value to the URL. If you were just starting out, I would say it was a flip of a coin whether you use /blog or not. Using /blog is not at all necessary. It would only be a personal preference. Since your site is ...


1

Whether or not you use the "subpage" feature in WordPress should have little impact on SEO. When you use that feature WordPress does two things: The URL of the subpage starts with the URL of the parent page. The subpage contains a link to the parent page. URLs URLs don't really matter for Google SEO right now. Google doesn't put much (if any) weight on ...


1

If you want to use htaccess, you can use the http header X-Robots-Tag: noindex to accomplish what you need for the specific files you need, or with a pattern. You can also provide other instructions, such as noarchive, nofollow, or even be specific for a particular crawler, for example Googlebot: X-Robots-Tag: googlebot: nofollow X-Robots-Tag: otherbot: ...


1

Facebook doesn't have to have good SEO. Facebook doesn't need to have lots of content in various languages indexed in Google. If you need to be listed in search engines, don't try to emulate Facebook. Google doesn't really support crawling and indexing several languages at the same URL. A few years ago Google announced that Googlbot was going to start ...


1

You are correct - these "generic" slugs you mentioned are called "evergreen" URLs and you should use them - in your case, something like: /blog/top-tablets Adding the year to the URL can make it a bit clearer to the visitor but I would say that is redundant in most cases (and not necessary for SEO).


1

I suggest you translate on english this article i wrote, it describe the full process of successfull seo migration. https://www.410-gone.fr/seo/optimisation-on-site/migration-https-certificat-ssl/refonte-site-redirection.html


1

I also agree with John Conde and yes it may take some time. Once Google crawls your site it will cache and index your pages in order to return the results quickly. So, it doesn't want to update the cache of billions of pages too often. There are some suggestions that Google has provided to hint to its crawlers to recrawl and reindex the site that may help. ...


1

The only way it would hurt SEO is if the new domain had previously been registered and used in an abusive or black hat manner. Just registering a new domain, with no history, and 301 redirecting it will be fine. (But do make sure all the redirects are 301s - permanent - to ensure search engines continue to index the existing domain, and not the new one.)


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