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82

URLs are not case-sensitive, only parts of them. For example, nothing is case-sensitive in the URL https://google.com, With reference to RFC 3986 - Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax First, from Wikipedia, a URL looks like: scheme:[//host[:port]][/]path[?query][#fragment] (I've removed the user:password part because it is not interesting ...


69

From here It's a little-known fact, but fully-qualified (unambiguous) DNS domain names have a dot at the end. People running DNS servers usually know this (if you miss the trailing dots out, your DNS configuration is unlikely to work) but the general public usually doesn't. A domain name that doesn't have a dot at the end is not fully-qualified ...


59

Simple. The OS is case sensitive. Web servers generally do not care unless they have to hit the file system at some point. This is where Linux and other Unix-based operating systems enforce the rules of the file system in which case sensitivity is a major part. This is why IIS has never been case sensitive; because Windows was never case sensitive. [Update]...


55

URL -- Uniform Resource Locator Contains information about how to fetch a resource from its location. For example: http://example.com/mypage.html ftp://example.com/download.zip mailto:user@example.com file:///home/user/file.txt tel:1-888-555-5555 http://example.com/resource?foo=bar#fragment /other/link.html (A relative URL, only useful in the context of ...


51

Hostnames without a trailing dot are potentially ambiguous. A trailing dot means that the hostname is fully qualified and may not be relative to the local search domain. Imagine you are a student of the (fictive) Example University which has the second-level domain example.edu. Inside the university's campus network you can omit the .example.edu suffix for ...


32

I disagree with the comment that SEO is extremely complex. Actually, it is common sense stuff. There is no magic, voodoo, special formula, incarnations, specific sequence of buttons and switches, etc. You do not need the voodoo priestess Bloody Mary to come to your house or office. How search engines work is very simple and only a handful of techniques that ...


27

Why 410 gone? Since the page once existed the correct header status return would be 410 gone, this will inform Google and other search engines to drop the page from its index. You should avoid using status 400 bad request since this implies the server did not understand the request due to malformed syntax. Using undesirable status codes will populate your ...


23

It's important to start a URL with a / so that the intended URL is returned instead of its parent or child. Let's say if your browsing /cream-cakes/ then you have a link on the page that has blah.html without the forward slash it is going to attempt to visit page /cream-cakes/blah.html while with the forward slash it'll assume you mean the top level which ...


21

URLs claim to be a UNIFORM Resource locator and can point to resources that predate the web. Some of these are case sensitive (eg many ftp servers) and URLs need to be able to represent these resources in a reasonably intuitive fashion. Case insensitivity requires more work when looking for a match (either in the OS or above it). If you define URLs as case ...


21

The use of 'stop' words have never worked negatively unless it was considered excessive word spam... in the late 90's they were treated as noise and to some degree ignored. Thankfully times have changed and Google looks at common words completely different than it did almost 2 decades ago. I highly recommend SEO guides written in the past 2 years. URL's ...


19

This is Google's Breadcrumb Markup, that renders this in the google search result rich snippet. More information can be found here: https://developers.google.com/search/docs/data-types/breadcrumbs


18

No, it will not affect the final letter case format of your domain whatever letter case you choose while registering it. The Domain Name System (DNS) names is case insensitive and you can not manipulate this by any mean when you register it or even define it to search engines for "good looking" purposes. All cases (upper and lower) will be accepted when ...


17

To know the age of an URL you can follow this link by replacing www.example.com by the URL you want: https://www.google.com/search?tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F2000&q=site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com&safe=active&gws_rd=ssl For example, here's the result from Google for the Meta site of Stack Overflow: Otherwise, the Wayback machine is ...


15

Parenthesis are "reserved sub-delims" as defined by the RFC 3986. That means that the character may have special meaning in certain parts of the URL. Here is what the RFC says about how they should be treated: URI producing applications should percent-encode data octets that correspond to characters in the reserved set unless these characters ...


15

Officially, yes. Any 4xx status may be interpreted as 400; the same goes for the other status groups. (E.g. a 503 service unavailable error may be interpreted as a 500 internal server error.) The RFC is written this way to allow for implementations that may not support every status, and also to allow additional status codes to be defined without breaking ...


15

It is more user friendly to translate slugs, but don't expect, it will bump your site's ranking like a bomb. Google is able to translate URLs by itself, so it can match a meaning of a page with english URL and italian content. URL translation could lightly improve your user metrics and user experience, which are ranking factors too. Also, if you do it, do ...


14

Does the leading '/' mean the path is starting from the site root? Technically this is referenced in section 4.2 of RFC 3986 as an "absolute-path reference": A relative reference that begins with a single slash character is termed an absolute-path reference. It ensures the path is absolute to the root directory and not the current directory (termed a ...


14

In your header you have a canonical link (on line 11, just under <title>). It looks like this on your page: <link href="http://escene.ir/component/products/?task=view.12" rel="canonical" /> This element tells Google your preferred URL for a page which has several urls to choose from. This is to prevent you from being penalized for having ...


14

UPDATE Sept-2019: Google's recent changes to Google Search Console has made my original answer (below) a bit outdated and in some respects incorrect. You can now submit two different types of properties in GSC: "URL-prefix property", which is the same as the property type mentioned here. In this case you would still submit all variations as required, ie ...


13

The web server software looks at the hostname in the HTTP request and uses that to determine which website to serve. For example, Apache has the NameVirtualHost configuration option which controls this behaviour. You can find a detailed explanation of how this process works in its documentation: https://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/vhosts/name-based.html


13

, is a reserved character. Reserved characters are never equivalent (for normalization purposes) to their percent-encoded variants. So these URIs are not equivalent: http://example.com/?foo,bar http://example.com/?foo%2Cbar Neither the URI standard¹ nor the HTTP/HTTPS URI scheme specs define a special role for , in the query component. This means that ...


13

There is a book called, "In and Out of Africa". If Amazon used URIs the way you are questioning, the URI would be `https://amazon.com/Africa". How would that be helpful in searching for this one book? Does that answer the question? Does this make you question your source?


13

The problem with reusing a 301-URL is that some browsers will cache the redirect for a very long time, see, for example: How long do browsers cache HTTP 301s? 301 Redirects: The Horror That Cannot Be Uncached So, theoretically, there could be users that are automatically redirected from contact to contact-us, even though you have disabled the redirection ...


11

(A similar question got closed as duplicate, but the OP was not exclusively interested in SEO, so here comes an answer about general benefits.) Including the publication date in the URL can be good URL design. Usability: descriptive URLs An URL can give clues about the content it refers to. Giving users such information before they click at the link is a ...


11

Should I go out of my way to force the framework to change everything to lower case? No, that's not necessary. Windows operating systems are case insensitive, including their server OS's and framework applications. Linux/Unix operating systems are however case sensitive. Internet-based applications (e.g., browsers) should normalize URL's, as covered in ...


11

Back in the days the trailing slash suggested "this is a directory" in contrary to "this is a file". Browsers would react slightly faster – or at least that's what I was told – when they were indirectly told "look for a file called index…". Today that trailing slash is next to obsolete. Today it is considered good practice to either always or never have ...


11

This is actually outdated. It is now stated that there is no link equity lost through 301 redirects. However, there are still risks linked with changing the URL structure and redirecting. For example, all pages which are redirected to must be relevant (i.e. is it just a URL change redirecting to the previous version of the page or are you redirecting to a ...


10

If the root (/) 301 redirect to /en/, Google will most probably consider your homepage is http://www.example.com/en/ and there is no problem not to have a root (/) page. Regarding Google guidelines for multilingual sites, you can use this method to separate languages on your site.


10

Browsers do not try one protocol and then fall back to the other. The browser will use which ever protocol it is linked to. If that protocol isn't supported, the user will get an error. If you want to force users to use one protocol, you can redirect from one to the other. For example, to force secure connection on your site use the following rewrite ...


10

Google seems to put very little weight on how a URL is structured right now. You can confirm this by doing any Google search and looking at the URLs that are ranking. You are just as likely to see any of these styles: Exact match domain: www.keyword-phrase.com Exact keyword path: example.com/keyword-phrase Lots of directories: example.com/category/...


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