9

I've encountered the same situation. It appears that this behaviour is affected by settings in: Admin -> View Settings -> Default site (optional) You've probably placed there your site name, and now it is appended to every url in reports, because proper use for it is alias for default page when no page parameter is set, i.e. placing there index.html means ...


7

Well, firstly, it does make the URL more readable. i.e. A URL such as mysite.com/pianos is a lot more informative than a URL such as mysite.com/?id=2347. To your common user, 2347 doesn't mean anything. It is random gibberish. The numerical ID-based URL doesn't give any indication about the type of content that is on the page. If a user decides to copy and ...


6

From the SEO prospective, i bet there might be a difference: In you first example, the ID is separated from the title, making it clear to the crawler it is a different resource (as the / character does it naturally). In your second example, the ID is mixed with the title. It requires more brains from the crawler to determine the meaning of it. Imagine the ...


6

Putting the ID near the beginning of a URL is better than putting it near the end. URLs often get truncated in emails or by CMS systems that show them to users. When the ID is at the end the truncation will often lop it off and cause 404 errors on your site. When it is near the beginning, your site can still redirect to the full URL. When Googlebot ...


5

Check out the URL of this very post on Stack Exchange, it's a great example of SEO-friendly slug+id addressing: /questions/119694/is-it-good-for-seo-to-change-an-articles-slug-when-changing-its-title The slug changes whenever the question's title changes, and it poses no issue for SEO. The key, of course, is for your server to look the post up by id and ...


4

You'll have better user metrics, if you create slugs in language according to the language version: users will easier remind about page addresses to visit them twice, users will faster understand the page's topics reading them in their mother tongue, in general, you get all benefits of using mother tongue instead of foreign language. But note! such setup ...


4

For SEO, I would say an id doesn't permit to easy remember the URL for users. Therefore, no matter on which URL you choose; an id in the middle or at the end of an URL doesn't change anything regarding SEO. However, an id in an URL can be very useful in case of you would have two pages with the same URL. This is the case for StackOverflow because the URL is ...


3

Ensure your canonical are set correctly. There should be only one canonical for each page. So, any two URLs that you consider the same must have the same canonical. From you example, it looks like the title portion should not be part of the canonical. Essentially that is all you have to do. The rest is waiting. Search Engine bots crawl the web to discover ...


3

The main reason for using "URL slugs" is usability. Making the URL readable and easier to remember (and perhaps help click through rates in the SERPs). However, as you fear, a long URL lessons usability. (If it's too long it's not going to show in the SERPs anyway.) But how long is too long? This could depend on the subject matter and the range of ...


3

.htaccess contains the rules that tell your server how to resolve the human readable urls so that they display the correct entry (internally wordpress still uses urls with query parameters, the rewrite mechanism hides them from a users view). Your Plugin want's to add new rules to the htaccess file, however it lacks necessary write permissions on the file ...


3

Definition of slug Slug is not a technically defined term. Depending on who uses/defines the term, there are different criteria involved. For example, the definition from Django says that a slug can only contain "letters, numbers, underscores or hyphens", while the definition from WordPress doesn’t restrict this. But it’s probably not useful to ...


2

It is valid but it is not the best practice. If we have an article for example named "Dogs happily barking" it is better both for your SEO and your users, to have a link like : www.example.com/category/dogs-happily-barking and not www.example.com/category/?123 where ?123 is the page ID because if I understood correctly this is what you are involving, if it ...


2

It is valid, I have seen many of website using numbers in URL, like labnol.org, stackexchange.com, howtogeek.com etc. Using question mark in URL is also valid, Because Google own Blogger product using ?m=1 at the end of URL for mobile search index. For example, just open Google from your mobile and search this "mybloggertricks" and you will see URL like ...


2

It looks like misconfigured custom filter for the profile. In standard setup, the home page is normally just /. It is a common practice to create a filter that adds the domain to the beginning to create example.com/. Have a look at the filters (Admin > Select the view > Filters) and see if there is anything like this setup: https://support.google.com/...


2

If you are going to change the already existing URL / permalink on an existing website, you can expect a dip in traffic after having to redirect it (301). On the question whether you should do this change or not: that's entirely up to you. If you think that "blog" is meaningful for your users or will improve your SEO keyword matching, there won't be a good ...


2

Describing the image yourself would be much better from SEO point of view. Article title always won't be matching the image contents. It would be manual work to describe the image and use that image name or alt tags but that is worth it. Don't forget that you can easily target Google Image search as a traffic source if your image appears in that search ...


2

Slug URLs are a minor ranking factor search engines use when determining a particular page or resource's relevance to a search query. So URLs will give low impact in the ranking. It's just used to identify web pages in a form that is easy to read for the end-user. In my opinion, you should use slug like your page title, so if your page title burning eyes so ...


2

A URL is a URL. It can have a query string or not. It can have subdirectories or not. But one format is not better than another as far as SEO goes. Search engines can work with all of them equally as well. Having said that, having a URL that clearly organizes and identifies the content of that resource is better than one that doesn't. Remember that users ...


1

Google doesn't rely just on XML sitemaps to know what pages you have on your site and which URLs it should index. See my diatribe on the subject: SEO Myth: Google will only index the pages listed in your XML sitemap. Google will index URLs that are not in your sitemap if: Those URLs have had links either from your own site or from another site. It doesn'...


1

While Google does recognize that /blog has a special meaning that signals a blog, semantically speaking adding /blog means nothing and adds no value to the URL. If you were just starting out, I would say it was a flip of a coin whether you use /blog or not. Using /blog is not at all necessary. It would only be a personal preference. Since your site is ...


1

You are correct - these "generic" slugs you mentioned are called "evergreen" URLs and you should use them - in your case, something like: /blog/top-tablets Adding the year to the URL can make it a bit clearer to the visitor but I would say that is redundant in most cases (and not necessary for SEO).


1

Taxonomy creates usually duplicated content. So i would make taxonomy terms as parameters to easy deindex them. Like this: pagination link - domain.com/blog/page/2/ taxonomy slug: pagination link - domain.com/blog/page/2/?taxonomy=term1 Single page - domain.com/blog/posttitle/?taxonomy=term1 Single page pagination - domain.com/blog/posttitle/page/2/?...


1

tl;dr - Please do not do this. Hop on over to the fix. WordPress is a fantastic Content Management System (CMS), and is generally considered great when it comes to publishing content written for higher search visibility (I don't want to use the term SEO here). What WordPress does as part of it's inherent design is for every post you publish which has a ...


1

If an user looks for a keyword in Russian, Google will display results using that alphabet. Using the example you provided: Googling Рефера́т, look how it makes Рефера́т bold, but not it's equivalent in the latin alphabet. Googling the other way around, it only highlight the relevant search, but not it transcription in Russian. The same happens in the ...


1

It's good that you're trying to construct friendly URLs but this particular URL scares me: example.com/do-you-want-2-or-3-? This is because it ends in a question mark. The first question mark in a URL is an indicator that what follows is a query string. Since I developed apache modules, I learned that in some system variables that I can import into my ...


1

The biggest mistake webmasters make is trying to focus too much on SERP rankings to the deficit of the user experience. It is unlikely that a user will specifically type in a decimal coordinate to your site to access the fictitious details of ants living in that location but it is also unlikely that they will want to describe the area based on highly ...


1

You want to keep URLs as short and simple as you can. Short URLs are easier to write down on paper and easier to type in as well. This URL... http://www.example.com/subject/history_a/nationalism-israel-other-nations/characteristics-nationalism-national-movements-europe-19th-century/12 ...is probably the 3rd longest URL I have ever seen. The best thing to ...


1

After 3 weeks of back and forth with the plugin owner, and trying many weird things, we eventually came across this plugin which lets you remove a slug from custom post type. The only reason this was an issue is because the KB sat in a subdirectory off our main domain which is not hosted on Wordpress. If our site needed much less functionality and we hosted ...


1

Try something like RewriteRule ^([en|es|ru|de]{2})/(.*)$ $2?lang=$1&%{QUERY_STRING} [L,QSA] Where you'll want to replace [en|es|ru|de] with the all valid 2-letter language codes your site uses. This will then take whatever is after the language-code in the URL, and use that as the "main" URL, and then effectively append ?lang=es to the "actual" URL, ...


1

Create a simple directory structure Use a directory structure that organizes your content well and makes it easy for visitors to know where they're at on your site. Try using your directory structure to indicate the type of content found at that URL. Avoid: Using excessive keywords like "baseball-cards-baseball-cards-baseballcards.htm". — Says ...


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