Hot answers tagged

18

Google knows different spelling for words (synonyms and use of accents/diacritics), it knows "Pokémon" can also be spelled like "Pokemon". That being said google will return either "Pokemon" and "Pokémon" results if searched for "Pokemon" and do the same for "Pokémon". However, it does give them a different ranking. This is based on the IP-address of the ...


8

You might struggle to find a unicode character to represent "view", but you'll find plenty of web font based icon sets with an eye or view concept. For example, Font Awesome – the icon web font used in Twitter Bootstrap – has an icon called 'icon-eye-open' that might do the trick. Font Awesome is licensed under CC-BY-3 (you can use it for free as long as ...


5

Character references like З have been part of HTML for a long, long time, and they are frequently used for various reasons. Google is known to support them (as you say), and it would be very odd for it to drop the support. So from the SEO point of view, there is no need to get rid of such references. The main problem with character references is ...


4

I found this: 2v⃗+w⃗=0⃗ 2v⃗+w⃗=0⃗ It would be nice if there were a more intuitive way to do it. But at least it works.


3

Short answer: No, it will not impact you negatively. Long answer: Unicode is just a representation of characters from U+0000 to U+10FFFF. Nothing more. Google is able to understand that just as well as any other standard represention of characters. If you asked "how SEO friendly unicode URLs are", well that would be a matter of taste, language and target ...


3

The Conformité Européen (CE) logo has prescribed layout and dimensions (https://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/ce-marking_en). Logo examples can be downloaded using Google images. When and how to use it on ratings labels is contained in the Machinery Directive (2006/42/EC) and various other EU directives. You register your Statement of Conformity and ...


2

No, there are no significant downsides to serving HTML documents as UTF-8 with BOM. Statements to the contrary are still common, but they are based on misunderstanding. Some very early browsers, which you now might find in a museum if you are very lucky, rendered a BOM literally in some encoding. Even in our times, PHP software still cannot handle BOM ...


2

Part of the advantage of UTF-8 is that software that only knows about ASCII can still read the files. When a byte order mark is present in the file, some of software that expects ASCII text may complain that the file is "binary". Modern web browsers are all capable of consuming UTF-8 with a BOM. I would still recommend omitting the BOM because it makes ...


2

Primarily, vectors symbols should be denoted using bold italic, according to the international standard on mathematical notations, ISO 80000-2. This is easy in HTML: <b><i>v</i></b> In theory, you could alternatively use special characters like U+1D497 MATHEMATICAL BOLD ITALIC SMALL V (which can be written as &#x1d497; in HTML), ...


2

⚲ (Neuter) looks a bit as a magnifier glas, that is what i setteled for as a view symbol.


1

While the share symbol is not in the Unicode range, maybe this workaround will help you: http://jsfiddle.net/chillybang/a7v5obqj/ HTML <span class="share">&lt;</span> CSS .share { font-weight: bold; position: relative; } .share:before { content: "."; font-size: 2.2em; position: absolute; bottom: -2.5px; left: -...


1

RewriteRule ^Indian-Patriot-Name-English/([A-Za-z0-9-]+)/([A-Za-z0-9-]+)/([^\x00-\x7F]+ [A-Za-z0-9-]+)?$ indianpatriot.php?id=$1&lid=$2&name=$3 [B,L,QSA] I get Internal Server Error ... You have an erroneous space in the RewriteRule pattern. This will result in your "Internal Server Error" since spaces are delimiters in Apache directives. If ...


1

Google sees that two things. The search term flowing → systems has an → character, and so does your title. There are also → symbols throughout your website, including an exact match of flowing → systems in one of your h2 tags. Google sees this one your site, but does not see this on your competitors' websites. The search term flowing → systems is an exact ...


1

Per the applicable standard, RFC 1378, URLs can only contain ASCII characters. Good explanation URL Encoding: "...Only alphanumerics [0-9a-zA-Z], the special characters "$-_.+!*'()," [not including the quotes - ed], and reserved characters used for their reserved purposes may be used unencoded within a URL." Use percent encoding with URL Decoder/...


1

The only way to make an unicode icon display across browsers consistently is by loading the icon's default webfont. For example, the electric light bulb unicode character uses the Symbola font. If that isn't installed on the device, the device will then use the fall-back of the fonts you listed. For a cross-platform solution, you'll need to use font icons ...


1

Unfortunately, getting character encodings right means checking multiple places. Data can be corrupted in half a dozen places. You need to go through and check each of them. How did you import the data from your Windows machine? Did you use mysqldump? Did you copy the database tables? If you used mysqldump you need to use the --default-character-...


1

URL length has little impact on SEO. Google does not appear to have direct signals in their algorithm to prefer shorter URLs. There are two possible SEO considerations with long URLs: Long URLs often get truncated when posted into forums and emails. Long URLs cause pages to be larger and take longer to download. Especially when there are hundreds of ...


1

As you know, URL Length is important for SEO. Citation needed. There is no particular hard limit for URI length. URIs should be kept manageable for usability (eg: can you easily copy-and-paste it? could you type it if you needed to?), and there is no gain in packing them with irrelevant keywords, but you should not be worrying about truncating titles to a ...


1

The default arrow is a bit large for use as an over-arrow but you can do <math xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML"> <mover> <mi>v</mi> <mo mathsize="50%">&rarr;</mo> </mover> </math> which renders reasonably well in firefox (gecko) and chrome (webkit) on windows, can't test iOS.


1

This question was asked in 2012. Browsers in 2020 now support a much wider range of Unicode characters. These three Unicode characters all render in my browser (Ubuntu 19.10, latest FF and Chrome): Right-Pointing Magnifying Glass (&#x1f50e;): 🔎 Left-Pointing Magnifying Glass: (&#x1f50d;): 🔍 Eye (&#x1f441;): 👁 I ran a browser ...


1

In other words if you are in WordPress and HTML5, only copy proper utf-8 encoded characters over and problem is solved. Just Google "utf-8 list of characters" and copy straight from your browser to your editor(in visual mode). Then the question mark ? wont appear like �


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible