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14

You're right that the trick is a wildcard DNS entry (indicated with asterisk) . Essentially it's a DNS entry that will match all subdomains that don't have a specific DNS entry. Then the "routing" happens on the application/website side. There is no actual DNS entry created for the subdomain, the reason that it finds a "match" when a DNS request is made, is ...


8

Great question! This can actually be done, but it's relatively tricky. Tumblr has made it very clear that they don't want you to do this. They have silently broken CloudFlare integration a while back, where everyone who did this reverse proxy stuff with CloudFlare has basically gotten booted off of their custom domain name without any warning. (Keep in ...


5

We can actually manage the DNS for the record pointing to Tumblr. You can't, however, have our proxy (orange cloud) turned on for the record & it should be grey (direct).


2

IFrames are completely ignored by search engines, then pets.tumblr.com/cats will look as a blank page. All content inside the IFrame belongs to a different site. Using IFrames will not hurt pets.tumblr.com but your pages will never get ranked because they will be blank pages. Doing javascript/jquery redirect might look as a sneaky redirect, you are sending ...


2

Yes, this will work. When you use a custom domain with tumblr, tumblr issues a 301 redirect1 (moved permanently) for all pages and subpages to redirect your tumblr subdomain at example.tumblr.com/path/ to your registered domain at example.com/path/. When Google has re-indexed the site to display URLs with your registered domain instead of the original ...


2

The CNAME looks correct according to Tumblr's support doc on using a custom domain name, and if you're reaching a page on their end (as seen before), it's resolving to their servers. The problem might be related to the .tk ccLTD: Since its registrations are offered free of charge, spam and phishing operators have historically abused .tk domains - see this ...


2

It sounds like you haven't completed the "Post-login steps" from http://www.tumblr.com/docs/en/custom_domains Click Settings (the gear icon) at the top of your Dashboard. Click the blog you’d like to update on the right side of the page. Click the pencil to the right of the username section and enable "Use a custom domain." Enter your domain (e....


2

Googlebot uses heuristics to parse JavaScript for things that look like URLs. It then follows those URLs. Even when they are 404, it reports them in Webmaster Tools. Google knows that this will sometimes result in it downloading things that are in no way meant to be URLs. Google doesn't view this as a big problem. They find enough content this way that ...


2

If you have redirected the old pages to the new pages then you have done the most important part. Check that the redirect is a 301 redirect which means 'moved permanently' The site move feature in webmaster tools doesn't redirect a website, whereas 301 redirects do. You will still see pages from your old domain in the search index as it will take some time ...


2

You should not have any negative SEO impacts if you do the transition the way you are describing, with 301 redirects. Per a Google Webmaster Tools Help page, https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/93633?hl=en, 301 redirects are useful if you are moving your site to a new domain and want to make the transition as seamless as possible, which is exactly ...


2

Tumblr does use UTF-8. Here is a Chinese blog on Tumblr. They need UTF-8 to display the Chinese characters. I've use page info to verify that the character set of the blog's home page is indeed UTF-8.


2

You are not missing something but it might take a little while to pop back into life and you might need to turn "use custom domain" back on in your tumblr settings. I tried to do this myself for my own tumblr site and failed too. If you think think about it, it is obvious that tumblr would ban Cloudflare, as it would take the content of the tumblr pages ...


2

No, a CNAME does not cause a redirect. A CNAME is a DNS alias that says "The server for this host name is located at the same IP address as the server for this other host name." It is up to the web server at that IP address how to handle requests for the hostname. The web server may: Issue a redirect. Serve the same content as the other ...


2

CNAMEs work entirely differently to his many people think they do, but the problem here also likely involves the web server. CNAMEs map a (sub)domain to another domain. Because we are talking about web service ultimately this means converting a name to an IP address. What is happening in practice is your computers DNS subsystem looks up tumblr.wp20201111....


1

The "Host" is your domain name. So if your site is example.com, you might want to create: record Type: A Host: example.com Points to: 66.6.44.4 record Type: A Host: www.example.com Points to: 66.6.44.4 OR record Type: CNAME Host: example.com Points to: domains.tumblr.com record Type: CNAME Host: www.example.com Points to: domains.tumblr.com Here ...


1

i would avoid using canonical. Beside of this, you could have backlinks to your tumblr site... Why not redirect them all: tumblr to the new one? Presume your Tumblr site has urls like http://example.tumblr.com//posts/<POST-ID>/<POST-TITLE> and your self hosted site has urls like: http://example.com/<POST-TITLE> You than make redirects ...


1

Yes, Google will show the source of the image when image from your blog is presented to a visitor searching with a relevant term. It will be shown like this:


1

You can't use anything like code changes or godaddy settings but I would like you to recommend that you may use a redirection service which redirects requests to help you what you want indirectly . Take a bitly url or goo.gl url that redirects to example.com/home , let it be j . Now set up redirection of your domain to the url j we just set before . So now , ...


1

Just type cache: before the URL in Chrome’s address bar and it goes straight to the cached version. Or try https://archive.org/web/


1

(I would have written this as a comment but I still don't have the ability to) After trying it out on various edit modes, the output is always the same m&eacute;lt&aacute;n in the source code though it renders as proper letters in the browser. Search engines treat é, ė, ę as e, same for á, ą as a and etc. So probably they're smart enough to change ...


1

Managed to find my answer, basically after asking my hosting help it turned out the issue was my hosting account being old so not configured quite right, meaning the general instructions on tumblr for custom urls was correct.


1

You are correct that proxying less effective when the document has lots of variations for various clients. In this case it sounds like there might only be two versions, which makes the problem a little easier. The ideal solution would proxy based on user agent. It would serve the mobile version to mobile clients and the desktop version to other clients. ...


1

I did this recently, and it usually takes some time for the A record to update before tumblr's test button will recognize that it is set up.


1

How long has it been since the switch? Have you confirmed the 301 is working correctly? i.e. does each page 301 redirect to their matching pages on your new domain, as opposed to just the home page. Did you have webmaster tools set up on the old tumblr blog ? If so, did you inform Google the tumblr URL would be moving to a new domain? As explained here: ...


1

Did you possibly ask them for support? The Whois info for that IP is http://whois.arin.net/rest/nets;q=66.6.40.249?showDetails=true&showARIN=false&ext=netref2.


1

I couldn't find anything that indicated that Tumblr has a crawler. And typically "good" crawlers usually identify themselves as such. So this is probably just someone at Tumblr either viewing or reviewing your blog.


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