16

I would contact some of your local data-centers (rack-hosting, managed service providers, etc) and see about renting a vps or virtual machine for a day or two. Just be sure they allow you to bring in a disk for the initial transfer and they are aware of your bandwidth needs. You might also just ask if they would simply help you with the upload.. They often ...


11

You could if you have friends or employees willing to lend you a hand with their home connection, set up a torrent for the large file and set up your employees/friends as seeds. Of course you'd have to cart and copy the file to everyone. Even then, you could split the file into .rars and have "teams" send portions (taking care to make sure they don't ...


11

Here is a Guardlex article that claims that it is to prevent domain hijacking: Once a hijacking has been discovered, the responses to it tend to vary. The registrar is sometimes able to return the registration to its original state. However, if the domain name was transferred to a different registrar, this can prove to be difficult. This is especially ...


8

How can I easily transfer ownership of a web property? There's more to ownership of a web property than merely being able to edit the content. As Su' indicates, you should learn to build sites that have an admin interface (either by rolling your own or using a CMS) so the clients can easily change content on their own unless they want to pay you to also ...


7

Find a regional ISP that's locally owned and bring a nice fat external drive that can hold all this. Walk into their office with $300 in cash, credentials for your server, and a 12-pack of beer. Pray that they have a gigabit uplink because a maxed-out 100mbit will take you over 24 hours. That failing, look for local internet internet exchange point and find ...


5

If the files are text files or otherwise cmpress well you can zip them up before uploading which could reduce the file size by up to 90%. Then you can decompress them on the server. You can also try splitting the uploading between multiple locations. Each one then can give you their maximum speed.


4

Get a temporary hosting company you can mail your drive to, and then transfer from the temporary host to the permanent host at a faster rate.


4

These guys are in Tulsa, which you have in your profile so if you're in the area call them or stop by and let them know your situation. http://www.datastorageinc.com/


4

Still, this is enough to build websites for people. Well, it's (barely) enough to build static web sites for them. Unless your client's comfortable editing HTML, you need to additionally learn how to produce your sites such that they have some form of administrative interface. Whether that means using a development framework(some automatically generate data ...


4

Simple steps to transfer a WordPress site from one host to another: Install WordPress and setup database at new host Replace wp-content folder in WordPress of new host with wp-content folder in WordPress of old host. Export database from old host and import to new. Create a blank database in new host and import in that. In wp-config file, set database name, ...


3

PRE-STEPS Ask for access to the back end of the hosting package via CPANEL/Plesk or any other control panel they use. Once you know what they use you need to find out how to migrate that data from their host to yours, this is fairly simple but the mail part can be a lot harder depending on what they use and I can't answer that until you know. AFTER-STEPS ...


3

I just want to add to the existing answers something that might improve your transfer once you've got your hard drive connected to a server with good bandwidth. I needed to transfer large amounts of data several times between two web servers and instead of using common FTP or WGET commands to upload or download the data, I have been using the Linux SCP ...


3

http://aws.amazon.com/importexport/ Ship your device to AWS and they will take care of the rest.


3

Yes. The blog remains unchanged, it's the domain you use to get to it that changes.


3

If you can open access via ssh between your servers, then using rysnc to transfer the data would be much faster than ftp. Rsync automatically transfers data in batches and if you have to run the transfer multiple times, it only has to transfer the data that has changed. Unfortunately, rsync does not work over ftp but this question on serverfault suggests ...


3

Short answer? Both. Sorta. Transfer the domain name first. Not for any particular reason except that it may take a while. I have seen these go in just a couple of hours and I have seen these go for a couple of weeks. It all depends on the registrars and whether they have their [redacted] together. Having the domain transferred does not mean that you cannot ...


3

If you are redirecting old pages to the new pages that have the same content as the redirected pages (and ideally the same URL structure), then patience is needed. I suggest that you look at the analytics of the old domains and see which pages brought most of the traffic. Track those to see whether or not you regained the old traffic. But, if you are doing ...


3

You don't have anything to worry about. Migrations incur risk when: You're changing the domain name You're changing the protocol (i.e. HTTP to HTTPS) You're changing the URLs of any pages, as you'd then need to put some 301 redirects in place. As none of these seem to apply to you, all that's really changing is your site's IP address. That can only matter ...


3

the "Paper Lantern" theme for this one new account looks like an old X3 theme. It sounds like you are seeing the "Retro" style of the "Paper Lantern" theme. (This does look very similar to the default ("root" style) X3 theme.) If this is the case then you can easily switch back: "Preferences" > "Change Style" and select "Basic".


2

I've had experience doing live IMAP to IMAP transfer with with Google apps, I only had difficulties with very large (1000 email+) folders. There was some loss during the transfer and you do need a computer with as much RAM as you can lay your hands on, but it was insignificant in the end.


2

If you open a mail client and add both old and new accounts side by side (with IMAP) you can drag the mails from one to the other - it's a pain but I've had to do it that way in the past. Other that that you could take the email on to Google Apps and use their selection of migration tools to accomplish the task.


2

Sounds like you need to contact GoDaddy and ask them what to do, FTP should work just fine.


2

When I integrate PayPal I only use the PDT transaction token on the return URL to let the user view the status of the payment. So when the user returns from PayPal the website is issuing a POST request (server side) to the PayPal server and the current status is retrieved. This information is displayed to the user along with any order details. If it failed ...


2

Firstly, using the cpanel backup feature isn't a very good idea in this situation because there are only options to backup and restore entire cpanel accounts rather than a specific domain. A prerequisite would be to set up the domain on the VPS. If memory serves correctly, this should be using WHM. The interface for this can get slightly confusing but the ...


2

CPanel has an export and import websites. That's probably the easiest and fastest way to do it. When I got a dedicated server with Hostgator they helped migrate my websites from Rackspace to it. I don't know if they offer that fr VPS accounts but if they do that would be even better. if those two options aren't possible all you need to do is move your files ...


2

Back-up everything. Databases, files, important emails. Your domain will have to be unlocked for transfer. It does take a while, and your site will only be down for as long as it takes to transfer DNS as long as your site is mirrored on the new host before transfer. Good luck!


2

Most shared servers I've worked with will temporarily throttle your upload when you go over their allowed upload threshold. #1 is the best because it requires fewer network connections to process your files. A server spends a lot of resources opening and closing new connections. Lots of network connections typically bog down a cheap server. Using #1 allows ...


2

Ok, so I have succeeded by making this little php script: <?php exec('wget http://sourcesite.com/backup.zip'); I mean, it's still transferring, so I'm not sure if there's some size limit but we'll see.


2

Google does not care which backend you use. If you keep exactly the same content, frontend (i.e., same HTML, CSS, JS etc.) and URLs, search engines wouldn’t even notice that you switched to a different system. While such a migration (without content/frontend/URL changes) would be ideal, it’s not necessary. The most important things are that you migrate all ...


2

On WordPress install a plugin to do 301 redirects... Yoast SEO and Redirection plugin both do this. They allow you to input the old URLs, and map them individually to the new URL's. I would advised first making a spreadsheet with all your old urls indexed by google, and submitted by your old xml sitemaps.


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