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26

During the high traffic period your server should be able to handle all requests made by visitors to your website. But there are some limits in concurrent connections handled by the server. So it's best to serve the page requests as fast as possible. Here are some suggestions to consider in these situations, Application level improvements: 1. Minimize HTTP ...


11

It sounds like the copyrighted content (the content that costs you money when someone visits that page) should be behind some kind of (free?) authentication/login? That would certainly help limit the number of visits to real visitors. You could perhaps have a non-copyrighted snippet or summary that can be indexed by all that linked to the full article in ...


11

This is actually outdated. It is now stated that there is no link equity lost through 301 redirects. However, there are still risks linked with changing the URL structure and redirecting. For example, all pages which are redirected to must be relevant (i.e. is it just a URL change redirecting to the previous version of the page or are you redirecting to a ...


8

I have just successfully blocked the Chinese searchbot Baiduspider from accessing any content on my site. I made the decision to do so because of the following reasons. Reasons for deciding to block Approximately every 20th request to my server was from a baidu bot. This is unpolite behavior. Baidubot accounts for 5% of my sites bandwidth usage. I make a ...


8

First of all, I'd recommend Cloudflare. You can create a free basic account and it will route traffic via local data centers to minimise the amount of server hops. Cloudflare's also great for caching content and has DDOS protection. Other than that, try to trim the fat from your service layer. Make sure you don't have any overly bloated database queries ...


7

I assume you're referencing Blogger (blogger.com)? Referer spam has been a problem on Blogger and other blogging sites for a very long time. Unfortunately there isn't an effective way to block it because it's very difficult to distinguish legitimate referers from spammers. Editing your robots.txt file will not help because spammers often use fake user-...


7

Unfortunately, you can't take down your website, or hide it from search engines, and not take a hit in the SERPs. If the search engines have you in the index, they'll come to your site to crawl it again, and once they don't find anything there, or are turned away, those rankings will likely plummet. Here's what you can do: Put your website in Maintenance ...


5

"Count of Sessions" is "The number of visitors with X sessions during this time period". You have far more than 123,649 users during the specified time. You had 123,649 users that visited exactly once (one session) in this time period. You had 2,419 users who visited the site exactly 8 times. To get the number of visitor who visited more than 8 times,...


5

Consider load testing your site. There are free tools available such as JMeter, The Grinder, and Gatling, which can simulate large numbers of visitors to your site. By testing the impact of heavy traffic ahead of time, you can determine whether any tuning you've done has been effective, and look at further tuning if not.


5

The main Google bot is visiting your site with a California IP address- there are some 'localized' versions but they do not always crawl your site with the same frequency/debt. Check google support site For this reason Blocking US ip's could be risky. You cannot simply allow access to the bot and block all other US traffic as that would be against Google ...


5

You have to first open your analytics and analyze all the landing pages. Go to Behavior then landing pages.| When you do that check the pages that received the most hits and collect all the keywords used to find your content organically. With that data you will need to search trends, events, terms and anything that the organic world could have done to send ...


5

This depends on your time, effort and methods. With a 301 redirect (if pages exists on the new domain) you pass on about 95% of your page value. Keep your oldDomain as long as viable, with a 301 header and a canonical tag. Domain Reputation and Domain authority will reset, but, if your site is build properly, will regain quick enough. I suggest a slow ...


5

I were to host a blank page with a tracking code on each of them I would be able to monitor incoming traffic to each domain, correct? Correct, although I would avoid a completely blank page and at a minimum use the opportunity to throw a simple page up there with "Coming Soon" or similar. If you want a stretch goal, you can stick a form on these pages ...


4

First, let's clear up a misconception in the other answers: Google search does not use Google Analytics in any way for ranking. Matt Cutts at Google confirmed this years ago. And if you think about it logically, for the most part it does not make sense for them to use that data for two reasons: (1) most sites get most of their traffic from Google, so ...


4

"Bad" traffic will ignore your robots and constantly spider you. It will always be changing ip addresses and agent combinations and that is a fact of life. You may be able to look into "honeypot" type solutions to stop bad repeat traffic that ignores your robots but it can become impractical to manage blocking it yourself unless you love the game "wack-a-...


4

The best source of free traffic is search engines. People perform around two trillion searches on Google each year. Of the people that click on a result, 94% click on the organic listings and only 6% click on the ads. That means that there are more free clicks available than there are all of the paid clicks that you named combined. Search engine ...


4

Alexa Alexa runs a large number of DNS servers and with it's partners is able to monitor a chunk of the DNS traffic for the Internet. With DNS traffic data Alexa can see the number of queries performed for DNS records. Using this data they are able to create relatively accurate estimates on the number of HTTP requests a domain gets. I say relative, ...


4

First find out if their url shortening service uses 301 redirects, if they don't, use another service. If you stay with them, add GA tracking parameters to your urls. You could create some "fancy" parameters values that perfectly identify visits that are coming through their service. After adding parameters sent them your urls. With those parameters in place ...


4

It is fully normal, that traffic drops after such basic change of URL structure. Google needs time to get the new structure, to re-index pages, to understand, whether the content changed and so on. I would say, the drop time is from 1 up to 5-6 weeks long. But you can speed up the re-indexing with new sitemap and new content, which is backlinked externally.


4

In Analytics: Acquisition > Channels click on "Organic Search" - this gives the report with the evolution of organic traffic. On the top of this graph you see Sessions vs (Select a Metric) - click on the (Select a Metric) and start typing "Bounce rate" in the search field - select when the field appears. This should be the graph you're looking for.


4

Your Website is not monitored: They do not monitor your website traffic, they simply estimate your website traffic, exactly the same way Alexa estimates it. This is mentioned on both SimilarWeb and Alexa. Alex mentions the traffic is estimated: SimilarWeb mentions the traffic is estimated: How do they estimate my website traffic then? They estimate ...


4

Our site has lost substantial traffic after moving to HTTPS. Keyword here is moving. If you just changed everything over to HTTPS from HTTP (and got rid of the HTTP version), then many robots that had access to your site before the change will think you don't have a site anymore since they will come across a series of "404 not found" based pages generated ...


4

Firstly, resources are very cheap these days so, I guess you can find way around. It is not recommended to make your website offline for that long as it will impact on ranking, you may be able to recover but the impact will be there. Affiliate: If you got high traffic, depending on the industry you may be able to find some affiliate to finance your ...


4

Arin.net shows that this is /16 subnet mask meaning that RGH has 65K IP address in their subnet. That's quite a few IP addresses given that many companies NAT their internal networks anymore for security purposes. You might reach out to the IT team at RGH to see if they're leasing out some of their IP addresses to any ISPs. If they were, then you probably ...


4

The standard practice is what you already suggest, moving the pages and setting up redirections (make sure to redirect each page to its new equivalent). However, 301 redirects do not preserve all of the SEO value or link juice. Therefore, there is no guarantee that you will be able to achieve the same ranking/traffic with the new pages. I think your best ...


3

Just buy a bigger linode to expand my website. Double the power means that the server can handle twice as many users, right? Increasing server capacity is certainly easier. It sounds like you have a small enough server that it would be cost effective as well. Generally, I would recommend increasing your server first, then load balancing once that is no ...


3

You can trace the location of the spammer mostly they are from a group of IPs. Block those IPs. For Google bots you cannot do anything. By using robots.txt it will disallow your whole domain or page for audience coming from search engines. While submitting sitemap set the page change frequency to "NEVER". Surly it will reduce the bot traffic.


3

Just decided to block Baidu as the amount of traffic it was giving us was too negligible for their aggressive scanning. In addition, they now run an agent that impersonates a browser and launches JavaScript code (such as Google Analytics) and messed up our statistics. The nice version is updating your robots.txt with the following User-agent: Baiduspider ...


3

Does Google have any notion of how often a result is clicked for a particular search term? If so how? Yes, when you search on a term like "hats", Google returns links to each result with parameters in it - you need to right click and copy the link to view the parameters. For example the first link returned for "hats" currently has: https://www.google.com/...


3

I have never seen any evidence that Google uses traffic to a website as a ranking signal. There is certainly a bunch of speculation about it in this thread on WebmasterWorld. If they did, they would have to very careful about it. Google is the main traffic source for most websites. Using website traffic as a signal would have to exclude traffic that ...


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