7

As per my comments, it would be unwise to solicit the sale of example.com directly to the owner of example.net, as that might be interpreted or argued as a sign of bad faith, and/or that you don't have any legitimate interests in example.com, which are two of the three elements necessary for successfully wining a Uniform Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy ...


6

(I'm answering this from the perspective of U.S. law; your legal jurisdiction may have different laws.) It depends on your intent. In your case, it's not likely to cause any problems unless you try to pass yourself off as being affiliated with Google—you should probably have disclaimers denying any such affiliation just in case. If, OTOH, you were ...


5

I wrote to Google with the same question, for a domain that I had thought of using... then, I decided to first ask them if they would object. They answered as follows: Thank you for contacting us with your inquiry before registering the domain names in question. Unfortunately, we cannot approve the registration of domain names that include Google's ...


5

It depends on some factors. First of them is: Is piggybank.com in the same branch as you are? If it is clearly something completely different, it might turn into a problem. Then, is your name (now piggybank) some general word? Like Apple (Those lawyers have pulled some magic). If it is something less broad, something specific, that will increase your odds. ...


4

The good news for you is that it is usually far cheaper for you to bid on your own trademarks than it is for competition to do so. In my experience, you can usually bid on your own trademarks and get the top position for 1 cent or 2 cents. This is because: The click through rate will be higher for you because you are the official site The content on ...


3

Yes. They are right. Here it is: http://tmsearch.uspto.gov/bin/showfield?f=doc&state=4801:2tk3qv.2.2 You do not want to register a trademark as a domain name. One can argue locale in some respects, however, this is a company that offers... Printing fonts that can be downloaded provided by means of electronic transmission ...which means that ...


3

I dont think you can register a trademark and then claim ownership of previously registered domain names, (though obviously you would need proper legal advice.) Looking at the domain name dispute policy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Domain-Name_Dispute-Resolution_Policy A complainant in a UDRP proceeding must establish three elements to succeed:...


3

Short answer: Yes Long answer: Copyrights protect works, and trademarks protect marks (i.e., a recognizable sign, design or expression which identifies products or services), so trademarks are what you should be concerned with when registering domains. Since they're so widely used, the names of programming languages are typically in the public domain, ...


3

They can file a DMCA and seize control of the domain, that's worse than being 'penalized'


2

Not generally. However, if the logo appears large enough to give the wrong impression, then I would not use the photo unless you can create a logo for your site and possibly place it over the other logo making it clear that the two are not the same. You do not have to cover the logo completely, just enough to give the right idea.


2

If you buy a domain name that contains somebody else's trademark, then you will have trouble. From your example CocaCola could sue you for trademark infringement, and they would likely win. You would be forced to pay damages and give up the domain name. At a minimum, you should check your domain yourself by searching the words in it to see what is ...


2

It's absolutely fine to use trademarked terms on your website providing you cannot be perceived as passing yourself off as that company... Simply linking to websites using the brand name as the anchor is certainly no cause for concern.


2

Trademark Clearinghouse is the only central database used by all gTLDs during their sunrises, as you found out on ICANN website. You need to use one of its agents: http://www.trademark-clearinghouse.com/agents They will handle both registering your trademark in the Clearinghouse giving you the SMD file when you do attempt the registrations Note that some ...


2

The list of .APP registrars should supposedly appear at https://www.registry.google/about/register.html at some point. In the mean time, 2 options: either contact your registrar of choice, the one with whom you are already doing business, that you know and appreciate; they should be able to at least help you and let you know if they will either provide this ...


1

101domain is currently allowing for trademark holders to register their .app domains. If you scroll down on the following page you'll see that we are currently in the sunrise grace period for trademark holders: https://www.101domain.com/app.htm I've held some domains with 101domain over the years. They seem fine.


1

The rule for trademark varies in different countries. Generally speaking, if the domain was registered before the trademark then you shouldn't have any issue. But to maintain your ownership in future, you may need to contact local IP and seek further clarification.


1

Google handles special chars, and it seems they don't affect rankings: https://www.google.es/search?q=Google%C2%AE&oq=Google%C2%AE https://www.google.es/search?q=Google*&oq=Google* https://www.google.es/search?q=Google*%2F&oq=Google*%2F ; but as Matt said, you should avoid to make thinks harder for robots, google's or any others: How does ...


1

We cannot tell you based upon this. Trademarks are conditional. This means that the answer depends upon how the trademark was registered, is used, has been used historically, and how you are intending on using it. While your example sounds good, it is replete with irrelevancy and incomplete in actionable facts. This is why I keep telling people that it is ...


1

You can dive into the WIPO domain name disputes to get a feeling of cases which were won by the registrant to understand how it's really decided. There are sometimes some very surprising decisions, and it's a good way to understand the rules in practice.


1

If you choose a domain name that conflicts with any one of the millions of commercial names that already exist, you risk losing it. And if you've put money and sweat into marketing your website and then are forced to give the domain name up, your Web-based business is likely to suffer a damaging, if not fatal, blow. Here are the basics you need to ...


1

Here's a link to check trademarks in the UK... https://www.gov.uk/search-for-trademark This link allows you to search directly with the UK Intellectual Property Office who are charged with the responsibility of maintaining all requests for trademarking within the UK. If it is not listed on here, it is unlikely to be a registered trademark, at least in the ...


1

If you don’t operate in the exact same market segment as the trademark holder, then use another domain registrar to register the name that you want. The only way to violate the trademark would be if, for example, they sell cars and you sell cars. It might be that every single word in the English dictionary now has a trademark applied to it somewhere in the ...


1

I am assuming U.S. law. I would always advise seeking the advice of a lawyer especially one who deals in these matters. Trademarks are not like copyright where a copyright is automatic. However, if someone has been operating under a certain name, trademarked or not, they may have a claim depending upon whether the reasonable standard applies. In this case, ...


1

You may add links on your site to your Facebook profile, YouTube page, etc. In that case, this is not a problem of copyright. You may add them if you want to.


1

You asked a specific question which I will address first. Can you register a trademark then require an existing domain owner to give up that domain? No. The registration predates your trademark and therefore cannot violate the law. In fact, within some areas, they could potentially have a claim against your trademark if they have been operating under that ...


1

Essentially this reduces down to if your situation merits filing a UDRP, which is the resolution process adopted by ICANN (the governing agency of TLDs like .com) for disputes over domain names. In order to be successful in a UDRP, you need to establish three elements: The domain name is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark ...


1

If you don't see the offending keyword in the page source but Google does, they might be serving different content to Google & crawlers than they are to human users & browsers. Try loading the page with http://web-sniffer.net/ and set 'Googlebot' as the User Agent. Look through the page source you get back for any phrases that might not show through ...


1

If you let a expiring domain enter the deletion stage then the domain becomes available to everyone to register. The new registeree has no obligation to pass the domain back to the original buyer as this the new buyer is treated as the legal binding owner. Now the good news is if indeed you have a 'Trademark' then you may be able to get the domain back in ...


1

I asked the same question to godaddy and Reply from godaddy is, We may buy the domain from godaddy like this, however, if his tech giant company files copy right related issues since Google and Facebook keywords are the brands they own, you may have legal issues.


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