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21

Copyright applies to content. So copyright would not apply here since the content is uniquely yours (assumption) and that the theme is available for use by many. Trademarks should be registered (generally). Unless you are using a trademark that is not yours, this does not apply. However, too much similarity may still be considered trade infringement ...


5

Always Look for Better Solutions As a rule-of-thumb, always look to see if there are any better solutions. Themes often become dated or even abanded when the developers move on or focus on a new theme they are making. On top of this, new technologies emerge that might not be compatible with older code, such as newer and faster versions of PHP. Google ...


4

You should reserve your h1 tag for the most important text on the page - usually the large text near the top that describes the topic of the page. If your entire website (and therefore your site nav) is about your podcast show, then your h1 may simply be something like "Episodes", with your title tag being "Episodes - Title Of Show". Edit:...


4

Two easy ways to fix this, depending on whether you want to customise just one blog post or make the change site-wide. For just one post, manually set its URL in the YAML front matter like so: --- permalink: /2013/11/10/mypost.html --- To change every post site-wide, you would edit your _config.yml to switch from the default 'date' permalink pattern you ...


4

Just adding to closetnoc's answer. Wordpress is released with GPLv2 (or later) from the free software foundation. Part of this license outlines requirements for derivative works, such as plugins or themes. Derivatives of WordPress code inherit the GPL license. Which means that it's free full stop! (Developers only charge you for access, automatic update ...


4

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '<' in /membri/thekrumbs/wp-content/themes/comicpress/functions.php on line 40 <?php if ( has_post_thumbnail()): the_post_thumbnail( 'featured-image', array( 'class' => 'featured-image' ) ); endif; ?> You have a PHP code block, ie. <?php...?>, nested inside a PHP code block. This code looks out of ...


3

Yes, you can do whatever you like with theme that you have. You've purchased it (or it's free). As long as you purchased it or if it's free, you can do whatever. Just make sure that you make a child theme out of your theme. (there are tutorials for this on wordpress community) That's because if you (in your example) edit functions.php without making a ...


3

Would I be right in saying that as they do not own the intelluctual rights this wouldn't be a problem to do. No. Copyright is far from the only applicable law here. For instance in Brookfield Communications, Inc. v. West Coast Entertainment Corp the use of a competitors domain name in meta tags was found to be a trademark infringement. More directly this ...


3

In short: changing your theme very well might affect your rankings. This might be caused by (a combination of) the aspects below: The theme is likely to contain multiple changes to the way on-page elements like h1 and img are placed in the source code. Perhaps it will even change the way that elements like rel="canonical" are handled. Also, the way in ...


3

First of all, the main question: does your website already have organic traffic from search engines? If not, you shouldn't worry about SEO with changing the WordPress theme. If yes, read below. If you don't know at least a little about SEO, it will be difficult for you to make this move safely. You need to analyze the changes that will occur after moving to ...


2

I think the question is similar to changing website's platform So if the structural, mark-up, meta, micro data and content remain the same, it doesn't affect SEO. For WordPress, the theme is one of the most important factors in SEO. You should use a theme that is SEO friendly which has good structural, meta, and micro data. And don't change the themes if ...


2

Not seamlessly interchangeable. You need some basic HTML and CSS knowledge in order to be able to switch different themes. However, if you make sure your different themes are using the same Bootstrap version (v2.0 - old, v3.0 - most used, v4.0 - beta) and you are familiar with HTML you should be able to switch them. I used to work with the official ...


2

You and your competitor are using someone else's product for the product's intended use. You are both allowed to use the product in the same way. What matters are the things that aren't part of the product itself: Did you write similar content? Are you using the same custom scripts that weren't part of the theme? Is the design similar enough that a non-...


2

I believe the Settings -> Reading, where it says For each article in a feed, show: Full text, Summary setting actually will only affect the RSS feeds generated from Wordpress. I believe to achieve what you desire, you have 2 options. You can either manually set an "excerpt" in the New Post screen (you might need to activate that option under the Screen ...


2

Purchase the correct license. Send the developer a bill (or get them to trade work in kind). Hope for the best and move on Asking if there is "a way to get caught?" on a website populated by people trying to make a living on the web is bad form, at the very least. Wordpress themes, even the silly expensive ones, aren't that expensive. If you can't afford ...


2

The theme IS very slow and tests with YSlow and Firebug don't really indicate any one reason why this is. However, with enough experience looking at web pages you can see some trends. Something to think on: you might benefit from learning to be more specific when reporting on issues like site speed. What is slow - load time or animations? Which pages are ...


2

The theme, per sé, does not matter for SEO as themes are not a ranking factor nor a concept that search engines care about. So choosing an existing theme, editing an existing theme, or creating one from scratch really have no meaning here. HTML/semantic markup is a ranking factor so making sure you optimize that code is important so how well you write/...


2

I am no lawyer, but as long as you are not trying to confuse people by looking like a 'houshold name' brand, given that the theme is readily available there should be no issue. Make your site similar by all means, but also make it clearly unique and you should be OK.


2

WordPress implements the front controller design pattern. That is, one file handles all the requests for all URLs. Rather than the server figuring out which file to use based on the URL, the server hands all requests to a central handler that then programatically decides what content to use. This handler is named index.php in WordPress. It uses rewrite ...


2

URLs (what you type into the browser's address bar) and file system paths are two different things. Whilst URLs can map to file system paths, this is not always the case. And with WordPress and many popular database driven CMSs these days, this is not the case. When you make a request for /test-post/ on a WordPress site, WP intercepts the request and ...


1

Of course not. If you bought the theme from Themeforest (and from any other ThemeForest), you have the licence to use that theme for your own use and do whatever you want with that. If you want to create 2000 mirror webpages with that particular websites and you bought that licence, you have the rights to do that without risking anything. Also, nobody is ...


1

Why would you want links to particular posts in categories on your homepage when using silo structure? This will ruin your silo as you would interconnect your siloed structure instead of isolating to specific content groups. Try to outline your silo structure like this: Homepage Category Page 1 Related Post 1 Related Post 2 ... Category Page 2 Related ...


1

If you are going to buy a premium theme for WordPress (or any theme/template for any CMS), you are better off buying one from a developer who has a track record of updating the theme as WordPress evolves. This doesn't just apply for premium themes...when assessing free themes, check the changelog for the theme and see if the developer releases regular ...


1

Your display depends on your theme you use. A theme using the_content() will display the full article while a theme using the_excerpt() will display the article excerpt. It sounds like the proper way to do what you want would be to make a child theme off of your Accent theme and change the front page code from the_content() to the_excerpt(). Refer to http:/...


1

If the link is not showing in your source code (view the source via your browser to confirm this), then cPanel will be stripping the tag before it makes it to the screen, which is why your console will not show any errors. My hunch would be that it is a security measure to prevent potential XSS issues. Security is going to be a major concern to cPanel, and ...


1

The "Twenty Fourteen" theme does not support header widgets. Plugins don't usually modify themes, either. Your options are: Find a theme that has the feature you want Edit your theme Your theme can be edited from "Admin" -> "Appearance" -> "Editor" -> "header.php". There you could add the code for calling the widget you want. A word of caution, though:...


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