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You may not use embedded YouTube videos behind a paywall. That is prohibited by YouTube in section 4 of the YouTube terms of service: D. You agree not to use the Service for any of the following commercial uses unless you obtain YouTube's prior written approval: the sale of access to the Service; Youtube does make exceptions for using the ...


3

Encouraging them to disable AdBlock doesn't mean you're encouraging them to click the ads. There's a big difference. I wouldn't worry about that and give it a try, though I doubt you'll have any success with that method.


3

Copying from other sources without permission is copyright infringement and not legal unless: The text is public domain (which wouldn't be in this case) Or you get permission (you could always ask the other site) Or your use of it would be considered "fair use". (changing it and using it on your site would not be fair use) In the case of terms and ...


3

Terms of Services and Privacy Policies depend on the legal entity behind a website. They shouldn't be done based on how domain or subdomain are structured. I mean: if your forum is managed and owned by the same entity of the main domain, you don't need to have them separate. It's enough to have 1 privacy policy and 1 terms of service page. But remember ...


3

This is not in case they screw something up, it indemnifies them against law suits and other claims that may be filed against the domain name registrant (you). This is normal stuff. Any agreement for anything will indemnify the service company from anything you might do. They are not interested in secondary claims, joint filings, third party claims, or any ...


3

It might be a good idea to have consistency across your terms, otherwise people could be misled when searching for them. If you don't decide to make them consistent you should at least advise in your public terms of service they are looking at are limited in scope and that other terms of service will take precedence if they are using your service. Also, ...


2

Do they have a right to delete or ban content? That depends on the Terms and Conditions of the company that you most likely agreed to when you placed your order. I think you will find that most legitimate hosting companies will do their best to protect themselves from real or imagined issues from user uploaded content. Using my hosting company as an example,...


2

This was asked on the Google product forums. The best answer there says that it is not allowed due to the "unnatural attention to ads" clause in the AdSense placement policies: Publishers are not permitted to bring unnecessary or unnatural attention to their Google ads.


2

It depends. You have various options: Save user consent in the database (Y) and the version of your Terms and Conditions (v1, v2). Save only user consent in the database (Y) and user creation time (DateTime) since you know the version of your Terms and Conditions at the time of consent (ie. Last Effective Date of the agreement is 1st January 2019 and the ...


2

This is done by websites who really don't have idea how the web works and why are them online. That practice has no sense at all. It can't be enforced technically and I highly doubt it would be valid legally.


2

There is no specific requirement on how to receive takedown notices as long as third party authors can send you notices easily. Dropbox, for example, has an online form: While 500px uses an email address only: It's worth reading the current best practices on DMCA takedown notices (we researched DMCA here): Make your process clear Provide multiple links to ...


1

What is the official language of the jurisdiction that would settle any legal argument? Many T&Cs will have a clause along the lines of "Any dispute will be settled in the courts of..." In many jurisdictions, the courts won't rule upon documents that are not written in an official language of the country. This means that you provide your "Master" T&...


1

Google has not released any information about SEO & Youtube, but remember: Google owns Youtube. You can see Google in action about not releasing information, here: Google Product Forums But since Google runs the show, I would recommend following SEO advice for meta keywords in an HTML page the same way it is for Youtube tags. For that reason, I would ...


1

Of the 20% who do speak German, do they also speak English? If not, and 20% of your users don't speak English but instead speak German, then I'd think you've got a pretty large group of non-English visitors. It would make sense then to serve those visitors with T&Cs in their language (English and German). If everybody speaks English, or almost everybody, ...


1

You don't need to have separate Privacy Policy and/or Terms of Use. These legal agreements are binding between the company that operates the website/mobile app and users. If multiple subdomains and main websites are operated and owned by the same company, then the company can have just one Privacy Policy and one Terms of Use. What you should look after is: ...


1

While the EU law states that it covers sites aimed at EU users if you are not specifically targeting EU users then you should have no issues. Even assuming you do need to comply with the EU directive automated testing tools have no way to identify the difference between a security capture page and the standard site. You should be able to safely ignore that ...


1

It's not standard, but it is common. Here are the terms of service URLs for some popular sites: www.google.com/accounts/TOS en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terms_of_service https://twitter.com/tos https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms https://about.pinterest.com/en/terms-service en.wordpress.com/tos/ https://www.youtube.com/static?template=terms https://zynga.com/...


1

Disclaimer: This is not legal advice and I am not a lawyer. On scraping, Wikipedia says: Web scraping may be against the terms of use of some websites. The enforceability of these terms is unclear. While outright duplication of original expression will in many cases be illegal, in the United States the courts ruled in Feist Publications v. Rural ...


1

No, it won't matter that much. Matt Cutts recommends not focusing too much on this, but on your content: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unEML5n5vTo


1

Coming to this late in the day, but the 3 definitions given by the first answer-ee really nail it in my opinion. Rather than simply being an 'insurance policy' against legal/regulatory action, I think website owners should view this rather as an opportunity to show themselves as transparent and responsible. In a crowded market, this brings with it a ...


1


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