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2

According to the Mozilla website, about the «ARIA: heading role»: The best way to use this role is to not use it at all, and instead use the native heading tags through as shown in the example above. The heading role and aria-level attribute should only be used to retrofit accessibility on legacy code that you cannot make major changes to. Also, about ...


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I believe the issue here is a lot simpler than you're expecting. It appears that your website is 303-redirecting users to your privacy policy page if they haven't accepted the privacy policy yet. Googlebot can't accept the privacy policy and doesn't have any memory across page visits, it just follows the redirect every time. So all Googlebot sees is your ...


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The first rule for using ARIA says: If you can use a native HTML element [HTML] or attribute with the semantics and behavior you require already built-in, instead of re-purposing an element and adding an ARIA role, state, or property to make it accessible, then do so. The Html standard says about the div element: The div element has no special meaning at ...


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Semantic elements are parts of the current Html standard. With the correct syntax, these elements help search engines and browsers understand the hierarchical structure of a web page, and in turn displays this structure for users and this makes it easier to quickly browse the content and navigate to the user's goal. Also, semantic elements help screen ...


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I would argue that the episode number and name are equally important since the user may know one or the other. Generally, in HTML, the document body is the main section of your HTML page and can only contain a single H1. In HTML5 the <section> element allows you to have multiple headers in the main document as long as they're within these section tags. ...


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You're going to run into duplicate <h1> tags across other episode pages if the <h1> only includes creative work name. Speaking of semantics, why are we using <div class="header"> when we have the <header> element? <!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8&...


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The page should be constructed semantically with no consideration to layout or style at all. In my opinion the correct markup should be: <div class='header'> <h1>Creative work name</h1> <span>Episode 2</span> </div> This makes the most sense to Google, and to screen-readers etc. Then simply use CSS to display the ...


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Thousands of sites are hacked every day, and Google's algorithms are smart enough to detect when backlinks are not natural. It just doesn't count such links. This is also reported by Barry Schwartz in his Twitter. It would be "really rare" that disavowing links would help you purely algorithmically to rank better in search I also have my own ...


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Pinterest is using the subdomain method of internationalization. Let's take a look: tr.example.com <-- Subdomain Method Despite Google saying that they rank subdomains more or less the same as subdirectories/folders, SEOs still debate it. Strong opinions on this likely come from success after implementing it, which most likely has nothing to do with the ...


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To expand on Maximillian's excellent answer, it's important to note the following: The smaller size of SVG's only holds for illustrations, like logo's and other images that consist of a comparably small amount of shapes and colors. It is utterly unsuitable and consumes a rediculous amount of resources when used for photographic imagery. (Or it will simply ...


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If it is implemented well, it won't hurt SEO. When all URL changes are done onclick it might be tempting to no longer using <a href links in your pages. However, doing that would make your pages uncrawlable. To implement the feature while supporting search engine crawlers your links would have to look like normal links in the source code but have an on-...


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This setup is generally called a "single page app" setup. If done properly, it can have no negative impact on SEO. If done improperly, in some cases it could cause your website to drop from search engine indexes completely. It's difficult to get this type of setup working properly without an external tool or library, but there are many great ...


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In the vast majority of use cases, SVG does not gain any special benefits over the other image formats in terms of SEO. However, SVG images are often smaller than their counterparts in other image formats, improving page load times which benefits SEO indirectly. One thing that SVGs are not that much better at is letting search crawlers index non-image ...


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Neither of these methods will cause any SEO issues. The crawlers aren't smart enough to play your game, and links that self-link to the same page are perfectly acceptable (an example is the title of your question on this Q&A page). Don't overthink it!


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Technically speaking it's not ideal to use display: none to permanently hide content that will never be shown to the user. However there are so many legitimate reasons to use display: none, especially around navigation features, that as long as you are not abusing it in an obvious way to stuff keywords, there is an approximately 0% chance that you would run ...


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Google accounts for these sort of "boilerplate" content blocks. In this case you're talking about like a Call to Action statement. You're totally fine, it's not going to hurt you. These are very normal sections for pages to contain after the primary body content is finished. What would be duplicate content? If you copy and pasted content from ...


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Imagine what each page would look like if you removed the 300-word advert, and if that hypothetical page would still be unique, fleshed out, and stand on its own as useful content, then I would not worry about your pages being downranked as duplicate. Also note that duplicate content does not count towards any penalties, unless it is blatantly excessive or ...


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