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7

Nothing is ever really "hack-proof" when you consider the multitude of attack vectors. Whilst a purely static website may not be susceptible to SQL injection or WordPress script-kiddie attacks, there's still the possibility of an attacker getting server access or even just FTP access. This can be mitigated by disabling any cleartext access (i.e. use SSH/...


5

Aim for friendly URLs. Unless your blog talks about html code and you wanted to share links to examples of html code, I suggest trying to craft your URLs to exclude the extension. So your blog URL could be (for example) something like this: https://example.com/post-date/post-title/page-number then you can have it map to this sample URL: https://example....


4

Sorry but no, you can't. WordPress is entirely scripted in PHP. If you host a copy of a WordPress installation on a S3 bucket you will be lacking the PHP interpreter and the mySQL engine. The whole deal with EC2 is having a virtual machine so you can run services like a mysql server or a php instance. Anyway, with some elbow grease you could host a static ...


3

You may be misunderstanding the concept, here. Files on S3 cannot be modified, but they can be overwritten, and overwriting a file does not require deleting the old file, first. You simply upload a new file with the same name. The old file does not go away unless and until the new upload is complete and successful. A failed or partial overwrite of an ...


3

No VCS includes timestamp as metadata, even some do include permission bits. I think it's because when VCS tracks file contents, the last-modified time is not coherent. E.g. when someone modify a file, then undo, the last-modified time changes, but that file should keep the same version. BTW, Subversion has an option use-commit-times to use commit time as ...


2

If I was there, then I will choose these URL's, depend on my server configuration. https://www.example.com/post-title https://www.example.com/post-title/ As you can see, the only different is, slash at the end of URL. If you are running Wordpress in nginx server, then you can easily serve your content without slash at the end of URL, just like ...


2

The index.html in /post-title/index.html doesn’t appear to be relevant information, neither for bots nor for human visitors. It’s a backend/implementation detail (like /index.php/, /wordpress/, .jsp, etc.), and URLs are better off without them. You could even argue that the .html extension belongs to this category.


1

No one can know for sure how your HTML documents are delivered (unless they have backend access to your server). The URL can give a hint, but there is no guarantee that this hint is accurate. /foobar.php and /foo?bar could retrieve static files, /foobar.html and /foobar could retrieve dynamically generated files. But even if a search engine would know, it ...


1

The url example.com/places_to_visit_in_new_york can be created dynamically depending on the framework/language your website is based on. This means that you don't have to create separate files for seperate urls just like using the query string format. Consider the example of Wordpress where you have the option of choosing between multiple url patterns ...


1

Here's the solution if anyone is interested. shrugs /games/<?php echo $row_gamesList['game_file']; ?>?games_path=<?php echo $row_gamesList['games_path']; ?>&category_id=<?php echo $row_gamesList['category_id']; ?> Added the database category "game_file" then linked it dynamically to the website. "game_file" contains all 400 static php ...


1

It depends how many pages each of your visitors sees. I have a a currency conversion site where almost all the users view exactly one page. They land a currency calculator that is specific to the two currencies they want to convert. After performing their calculation, they leave the site. To optimize the site performance, the entire page is one ...


1

Most websites have some elements on the page that are static across all pages on the site: Header with logo and search Navigation elements (usually in a left or right sidebar) Footer with copyright notice, and privacy policy links. Parts of pages being static is so common that there is no way that it could hurt your website from an SEO standpoint. It ...


1

Generally, no. The only issue is when the sidebar info prevail on main info of the particular pages. Google names it as Additional value of the page. You may measure it as value for the users. So, if the page have enough value for the user, it is not a problem with sidebar (footer/header).


1

Oh heck no! Just make sure it is placed below your content in your HTML. You can create a div tag and manipulate it with CSS. Otherwise, Google will definitely be confused by it and your placements in the SERPs will suffer.


1

Created November 29, 2012. Last modified December 1, 2012. Alternatively: Created 2012-11-29. Last modified 2012-12-01. Trying to do use automated processes for this in the case of three static pages, probably to be modified once a year or so, would really be overkill. It would also be error-prone. Most “last modified” scripts use the last write access to ...


1

It's called magic variables. {{block type="catalog/product_list" template="catalog/product/list.phtml"}} is equivalent to layout's XML: block type="catalog/product_list" template="catalog/product/list.phtml" / that you can find in catalog.xml in example. Type attribute points to class - in this example it's: Mage_Catalog_Block_Product_List and ...


1

I've been working on a similar problem this week, a website I've taken over has 4,000+ broken links because the site was migrated away from an old CMS, so all the URL's are different. The only way I've managed to solve the problem is by adding a fair number of new Redirect rules to my .htaccess file. What you will find is that a lot of your old links can be ...


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