11

I would recommend you to install and enable Akismet: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/akismet/ Akismet checks your comments against the Akismet web service to see if they look like spam or not and lets you review the spam it catches under your blog's "Comments" admin screen.


9

Yes, different email obfuscation methods do work with varying degrees of success. But each has to be weighed with whether they affect the ability for your customers to communicate easily with you. I wouldn't want to be losing any business just because a user finds it annoying or time consuming to contact me. It would be a particularly persistent customer who ...


7

Look into having a honey pot in your form, this will only work though if it's a generic robot, as the moment a custom script is written the honeypot can easily be bypassed. Also, if you're not keen on a CAPTCHA you could try Solve Media's alternative and earn a bit on the side at the same time, I think it was Ticketmaster who recently started using them as ...


6

There is plenty solutions to expand short url: What is the best way in PHP or JS to expand shortened URLs like Bitly, Tinyurl to find the original URL? ExpandUrl (a java solution) Expand short URL – Simple PHP app for beginners expanding short url to original url using PHP and CURL Simple-URL-Expander (a javascript solution) When user submit a new post, ...


5

Various enterprise-level email systems have built in spam filters, things like Google Apps, MS Exchange etc. If you're hosting your own email, you'll have to setup your server with some sort of third-party spam/blacklist software, this will be a bit more complicated and will warrant some further research.


4

I have a lot of experience stopping spam. In fact, I used to speak with GFI and shared some of my filter techniques with them. You can stop spam with near 100% effectiveness with a few simple steps. This does not negate the need for an anti-spam filter or mean that you will never get spam, however, just a couple of things will almost stop spam cold. It is ...


4

Google probably won't remove the links on its own, if the links are showing up as coming from your website's pages then you can request that Google Remove them, you can also request links on other pages are removed (but this is a little more complicated). Google has a useful support article on the subject.


4

The ideal way to do this is to send a hard fail on email that isn't coming from your server IP address or your specified MX record by doing this: v=spf1 +a +mx -all This however will not stop the email from being sent. Spam filters do various checks on an email that has been sent out, one of them will be a check on the SPF record of the domain it is ...


4

SPAM reasons, Yes. Google no. There are non-Google spiders that look specifically for email addresses, presumably for SPAM purposes. So over the years people have tried to find ways to make email addresses less "visible" to spam crawlers. A very common way is to display name (at) domain (dot) com with a script behind it to allow the link to work as an e-...


4

To be honest with you I would like to think that Mail Chimp will have spf records and domain keys etc all sorted out and generally keeping the reputation of their infrastructure clean. Hence I would imagine this will be issues with your content and interactions from your recipients. A couple of things I have noticed straight off. It looks quite image ...


4

The answer is to not use a captcha, or use something in addition to it. Look to alternate methods such as hidden form fields that should never be filled in. Bots will most likely still fill them in, your validation will know immediately that it is a spammer. Another method would be the time based trigger. If a bot hits page then fills out a form, it will be ...


3

Having tried a bunch of different methods in the past, my answer, at least as far as "unspammable" goes, would be "You can't." Even with your image technique, or no matter what else you do, as soon as somebody does e-mail you they'll have your address in their address book. And then they'll get infected by a virus that steals their address book and sends ...


3

I would recommend you to use a free captcha service like SweetCaptcha http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/sweetcaptcha-revolutionary-free-captcha-service/ You can also use an external service to manage your comments like Disqus http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/disqus-comment-system/


3

There is no easy way to resolve this issue. I stopped using email all together. I prefer to have all contact done using a main "contact" form on my site. Using emails addresses became extremely frustrating. On the contact form I include a drop down box that includes different departments so users can select where the email should go like "support", "...


3

You can try to obscure the support email address by avoiding common terms like staff@ and support@ while using some variation that is easy to tell customers. This foils low-level spammers that just constantly hit those common addresses on every domain. You can also try to further obscure the email address by using a form that submits mail to the address ...


3

Having any email address exposed you run the risk of having the spam bots collecting that email address, there are methods that I'll list that can help you but its just like a car alarm, a car alarm can help prevent your car being stolen but it doesn't necessary mean it can't. Bots are forever becoming more complex and many are rendering pages just like real ...


3

Can you not just require that any post with a hyper-link must be approved before going live? This is what I do on my site. You can catch most of the spam and let the occasional legitimate post through with a genuine link.


3

No, that is not true. Email address obfuscation is the result of webmasters attempting to make their email addresses unrecognizable to spambot crawlers. Spammers employ bots that crawl the Internet looking for email addresses to harvest so they can send spam to them. By changing the @ symbol into (at) the webmaster is hoping that the spambots will not ...


3

By far my favorite technique is called a 'honeypot'. Here is how it works... Say your form asks for a name. Put the following two fields on the page: <span class='hp'> <label for='Message'>Message:</label > <textarea id='Message' name='message' /> </span> <span> <label for='TmpField'>Message:</label > ...


3

Yes you can. In fact, I recommend it and others too. I would not work so hard on my regular expression to include version numbers- just ^PHP.*$ You will find that some agent names are consistently up to no good even though some will argue that they can be used for good and should not be blocked. That is a negative argument. I study these things and I ...


3

Yes. You have a problem. Explorebuncombe.com: Is an events site and does not appear to have a copy of your site but may have in the past- who knows. It is not related to the next two sites. Exploredare.com: Is a copy of your site without a frame or 301 redirect. The IP address is 50.56.48.239 which is on a Rackspace IP address block. Exploregastonia.com: ...


3

This isn't a direct answer to your question but to your problem: Try a hostname filter on your Analytics account instead. Filter only for your domain. The only situation in which you'll get views without your domain being the hostname is if you're serving content on other domains - such as via an iFrame. When it comes to crawlers, there's many techniques. ...


3

I think you can try this Blogger form to report inappropriate blogger content On that form, select the Unlisted phone number option and fill up all details. I think Google don't consider toll free number as copyright content(DMCA), and hence you need to contact the host provider or owner. If nothing works then send legal notice to blogger and they will ...


2

If you've removed the target URLs for those links, then over time those links will drop out of Google's index automatically. Additionally, in most cases where a site got hacked to add content or links, Google is pretty good at recognizing that, and at ignoring those links. That said, it's never a bad thing to inform webmasters of hacked content / links ...


2

What do you mean by 'sending an email through my application'. If you have a server other than a google server touching it and forwarding it, and it says the originator is supposed to be somebody@gmail.com, then that alone could trigger Google to mark it as 'spam'. Basically, any server that touches an email will add headers to the message so that it is ...


2

Use multiple techniques and you can catch all spammers: honeypot as mentioned speed (bots fill forms very quickly) duplication (multiple text-fields like address plus comments) links in the wrong places too many links perhaps block all short links you can also look at doing other content checks like SpamAssasin does If you want a test, add something ...


2

Rather than have a email address on your site, I would suggest using a form that users can use to contact you. A contact form is much better at spam control than email: Sale value: An email address can be found and sold to spammers, a contact form cannot. Automation: An email address can be discovered in the page and bot spammed. An effective contact form ...


2

Have you thought about JavaScript obfuscation? There are a few different ways of achieving that, one service which would provide the output for you is hivelogic.


2

I have good experiences with requiring people to first login before posting a comment. I would also recommend Akismet, but my company is for my own business and Akismet is only free for non-commercial use.


2

To avoid bots, you can try any of the following, but CAPTCHA is the best way to avoid scripted attacks. You could use CSRF tokens to avoid this Insert or remove some value via JavaScript from the form element and verify the same on the server end. Check for the HTTP referer on sign up


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