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3

The answer is in the protocol you link to: The location of a Sitemap file determines the set of URLs that can be included in that Sitemap. A Sitemap file located at http://example.com/catalog/sitemap.xml can include any URLs starting with http://example.com/catalog/ but can not include URLs starting with http://example.com/images/. There is not ...


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The only fields that are useful to include in your sitemap are the <loc> and <xhtml:link rel="alternate" hreflang="en">. You can omit the <lastmod>, <priority> and other fields. Google doesn't use them. Google's Gary Illyes (methode) says: The lastmod tag is optional in sitmaps and in most of the cases it's ...


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You should create an XML sitemap and dynamically add new dynamic URLs to it. There is no need to use lastmod in an XML sitemap. Google says they ignore lastmod because few sites keep it up to date. Googlebot will notice any new URLs in the XML sitemap and will come crawl them whether on to they have a lastmod specified. You should not create a single ...


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If you are sure that all your internal links and sitemaps are correct, and that you have no red flag about your sitemaps in the Google Search Console, then there is probably, as clued by GeoffAtkins, at least one badly formatted backlink from a third-party website, coded like this: <a href="http://www.example.com/?page=x&amp;amp;item=5">badly ...


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It may takes several days before you can see the results of the submission in GCS, but in case there are validating errors it may take MUCH longer if it all. Try checking if you've get any of these errors and if yes, they should be cleaned up first https://validator.w3.org/


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It isn't clear what the "General HTTP error" is from the screenshot you posted. I can access your site, robots.txt, and sitemap myself. To resolve that problem you should: Click on "1 instance" and try to see what specific error Googlebot is getting. Use "inspect URL" in Google Search Console with a live test to try and reproduce the problem Examine your ...


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I suppose you could set the "last-modified" attribute to the date and time in the future when it will be published. You can read up on the supported attributes here. Search engines don't give much weight to sitemap.xml files compared to the actual structure of your site as visible to a human so your time is almost certainly better spent on something else.


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Search engines don't typically check for a sitemap at a particular URL. You need to do the step of informing search engines about your sitemap. The easiest way is to add it to robots.txt. It is just one line and then all search engines will pick it up. The most common location is to have the Sitemap at the root of your site at /sitemap.xml. If your ...


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The XML sitemap is usually the best method to pro-actively notify search engines of anything, not just 404 pages. But I fail to understand why you would want to do that? Having 404 pages in Google's index isn't necessarily a bad thing, unless of course these 404 pages are still getting a lot of search hits, in which case you may want to 301 redirect them to ...


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inhales While X-Robots-Tag and meta robots are equivalent, robots.txt is different. The former is about indexing, while the latter is about crawling/visiting. Tell bots not to visit a URL by using robots.txt. Use only one of the three for each URL. Using both X-Robots-Tag and meta robots on a URL is redundant because they are equivalent, and using both ...


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Solved! You were all right, just Shopify support figured out exactly the problem. In my DNS, I had added 5 A records of G-Suite which I should not have. You shouldn't have A records pointing to two places. Also, my CNAME was crayolex.myshopify.com and it should have been shops.myshopify.com Now the site should load for everyone else. And, the Google Console ...


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I'd strongly recommend it. What you describe — sites for different countries which speak the same language — is given by Google as a primary use-case for hreflang. See Google's relevant documentation: Some example scenarios where indicating alternate pages is recommended: […] If your content has small regional variations with similar content, in a single ...


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The website is blocked on other users network because you are not using correct implementation of https.It not your firewall, its their networks. You have https enabled but it might be an implementation issue from your dev team end. Three types of security symbols browser shows: Secure Info or Not Secure Not Secure or Dangerous Your website is showing ...


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You cannot combine your sitemap index and sitemap into one file. There is a limit of 50,000 URLs per file. Putting all your URLs into one sitemap would exceed the limits and cause search engines not to be able to download and process your sitemap file. You need to keep all 13 sub-sitemaps because of these limits. See https://www.sitemaps.org/protocol....


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As suggested in other answers you can handle this issue with help of header status. If you are still in real hurry and want it removed as fast as possible then you can use remove urls from your Google Webmaster Tools >> Search Console. Usually it is advisable to allow it to get drop by itself but this is when your 404 page is hurting your rankings or ...


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You can't do that. Google and Bing not allows your submit the external XML sitemap(not the same domain), you XML sitemap file should be access on the same domain . you have many solutions to solve if you host sitemap on the outside of site. Add reverse-proxy on Nginx to access outside sitemap file. example.com/sitemap > abc.com/sitemap.xml Uses third-...


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It's best to split the sitemap by your website structure, example category pages, product pages, blog, etc, this way you can easily debug it if anything goes wrong. Limit a single sitemap to 50MB (uncompressed) and 50,000 URLs. If you have a larger file or more URLs, you will have to break your list into multiple sitemaps. Make sure there isn't any duplicate ...


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the very same is here with me, problem was started from august 2019, till august it was working fine without any problem. last time when google read it there was a total number of 244000 urls from different sitemaps in the index file were showing as discovered. after that i noticed that 'last read time' was updated daily but there was no change in the number ...


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If you're going to use friendly URLs (which a fine idea), go all the way. Make sure that all links on your site use them, including the sitemap. Then, as Stephen touched on, either use 301 redirects or canonical tags so that if any crawlers visit your non-friendly URLs, they are pointed to the canonical page.


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In some cases, the image URL may not be on the same domain as your main site. This is fine, as long as both domains are verified in Search Console. If, for example, you use a content delivery network such as Google Sites to host your images, make sure that the hosting site is verified in Search Console. In addition, make sure that your robots.txt file doesn’...


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XML, which XHTML is, requires self-closing tags to have a closing slash. In a URI, a trailing slash indicates a directory resource. In a URI, no trailing slash indicates a resource; such as a file. On a top level domain, such as https://example.net/, browsers will drop the closing slash but I can't think of the details at the moment.


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Option #3: use a line for en, in addition to the three locale-specific lines. A Google representative has confirmed that multiple targets for one URL is allowed. You do want to target traffic to the appropriate locale-specific site, where one exists. That rules out option #2. Option #1 would work, up to a point, in that the search engine will still serve ...


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First scan your website using https://sitecheck.sucuri.net/ and see if you have any malicious code in your website. Once its clean, try to remove the old xml file and then reinstall Google XML plugin to create a fresh sitemap. I hope it helps, if there is still an issue do post here.


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I think it’s an assumption to say that just because a page shows up in Google search that Google has actually indexed it. Especially if you’re just using a search like site:example.com. If key word searches return your page then it’s probably safe to assume it’s indexed. It’s also possible that Google makes several iterations indexing a page before Google ...


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Have you looked at the Status column? It should show "Success" if Google reads it correctly as well as the last date Google read your sitemap. Just as an FYI, there's lots of comments here regarding the Sitemap Paradox. It might be beneficial for you to read through that discussion.


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John Mueller from Google answered this to me on Twitter:


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The answers are all here: Tell Google about localized versions of your page Two of the most important key points to note are: Each language version must list itself as well as all other language versions. and If two pages don't both point to each other, the tags will be ignored. This is so that someone on another site can't arbitrarily create a ...


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Google crawls pages on it's own schedule. A new site probably has a lower priority than an already existing site with lots of existing traffic. You might want to simply submit a few individual pages to Google Search Console via Inspect URL. My experience is that it takes about 7-10 days from submitting them via GSC for them to affect the number of pages ...


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It isn't normal - GSC should be showing the total number of discovered URLs found next to this parent sitemap, and once you click on it, then it should show each individual sitemap with their respective URLs found. My guess is that there's something wrong with this parent sitemap file - have you tested using online tools? How about using the "live test" ...


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