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7

...my browser would see a different signed cert than my session was established with, and cause the session to "freak out". From a webmaster's perspective, and without getting into details on "how SSL works" (which would be better discussed over at Information Security)... The session key would no longer match so either the server or client browser would ...


4

Midnight is the logic time to end a session - if there has to be a specific time at which each and every session, no matter how long it is open has to be ended. Even if it might seem stupid to count two sessions for a user visiting from 11:55pm - and leaving after 10 minutes. You might want to count visits per day/week/month/year. An in this case there has ...


4

No, unfortunately it's not literally 100,000 different people. More accurately, it's 100,000 different cookie values. A user can visit your site for the very first time and be counted with a first unique visit, but if they clear their cookies, or log in from a different computer, or do private browsing, then a subsequent visit would be "unique" again. So ...


3

May be the session level custom variable is enough for you. You can use a custom variable scoped to the session level for user login status. Async Snippet: _gaq.push(['_setCustomVar', 1, // This custom var is set to slot #1. Required parameter. 'User Type', // The name of the custom variable. Required parameter. 'Member', ...


3

Googlebot would NOT be able to crawl such a website. Googlebot does not use cookies, so it would not maintain a session to be able to crawl. If the sessionid were in the url, Googlebot would still have trouble because it would get different sessionids each time it crawled the home page and you would have massive duplicate content problems. Furthermore, ...


3

Back in September 2018 John Mueller from Google tweeted: Also see: Source: https://www.seroundtable.com/google-cookies-seo-26344.html Google's John Mueller said on Twitter that Google almost certainly cannot index a page that requires cookies. He said if you want Google to index the page, make sure to "remove the dependency" on cookies.


3

Based on the Google Analytics session definition available here: Every time a user's campaign source changes, Analytics opens a new session. So you will see two sessions. One attributed to external-campaign, which starts at the original landing page, and having an exit page within the registration process. A second one attributed to registration-...


2

It is as safe as it seems. If you allow them to stay logged in even after rebooting the browser, then someone can get on the computer after your user and still access everything your user can access. If you are worried about someone using your site inappropriately, then you need to make a lot of adjustments on your end, even with registered users to make it "...


2

The answer is quite easy when you look closer to the screenshot or your Google Analytics account. The missing sessions enter the funnel in later steps - like you can see in the screenshot. If you hover over the small bar at "Sessions with Add to Cart", you'll see a number close to 267,000. In your shop this can occur when your visitor fulfils one or two ...


2

You can use something like this 1) Set up onBeforeAction hooks to login the user automatically (which asks for credentials if user is not logged in to external service) var loginWithGoogle = function() { if (bla.isClient) { Session.set('loginError', undefined); bla.loginWithGoogle({ loginStyle : "redirect", requestPermissions :...


2

GA would see the session time as 20 minutes because it doesn't know that you visited a different site on a different tab.


2

Non-interaction events would cause this behavior. Senario: User loads page User reads the article for 24 minutes Browser sends non-interactive event to Google Analytics User closes the browser In that case Google would know that the user stuck around for the 24 minutes, but because the non-interactive flag was set on the event, they would still be ...


2

Google provides a well documented answer to "How a session is defined in Analytics" A session is a group of interactions that take place on your website within a given time frame. For example a single session can contain multiple screen or page views. Case 1: This would start a new session. Case 2: As long as the session has not expired due to ...


2

First of all a bounce rate of 2% is highly unlike and occurs mostly when tracking is incorrect due to pageviews being double counted. Now it has been fixed so thats the reason why you are seeing the correct bounce rate. Secondly notice that you pages per session has dropped 50% which means that if a page was being counted twice Now it is counted once For ...


2

It is normal to see abnormal bot behavior, in the sense that numbers do not seem to make sense. The boards are full of questions addressing many variations of similar situations. 2 things to do if you have not done one, the other or both. Sign up with Bing webmaster tools: http://www.bing.com/toolbox/webmaster Control how Bing crawls your site: https://...


2

You see this on a number of sites and generally it is related to the underlying software technology powering the site. A number of libraries here in Australia have a similar feature on their online catalogues and according to them it relates to the software that powers the catalogues. Basically what is happening is that when you connect to the online ...


2

Thanks for the trouble-shooting help. I have solved the problem -- by specifying a custom folder for storing temporary session data. Here's how: Locate the folder where your session data files are currently being stored. In my case, the folder was called tmp. The folder name and location may vary, depending on your version of Linux and how it has been set ...


2

That can happen when you are registering hits as events with non-interaction. Check Google's official post for further information: It's possible for the value of the metric Sessions to be less than the value of New Users. The reason is that Sessions is not incremented in cases where a session only consists of non-interaction events. In contrast, ...


1

It is possible that many or all of those sessions are coming from analytics spammers. Spammers have realized that they can inject data into your Google Analytics without ever even visiting the site. They simply make calls directly to Google's tracking scripts reporting that they have visited your site (even though they never have). They often do this ...


1

You are looking for the "Frequency & Recency" report. You can find it under Audience -> Behavior -> Frequency & Recency. For the selected time range, it tells you how many sessions are from users that visited exactly once, exactly twice, exactly thrice, etc. The report is limited in so far as it doesn't have the number of users associated with ...


1

From Google Analytics Help : How a session is defined in Analytics https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2731565?hl=en End of day expiry Bob opens your website at 11:50 PM on the 14th of August and leaves your website at 12:10 AM on the 15th of August. The first session ends at 11:59:59 PM on the 14th of August, and the second session begins at 12:00 ...


1

In https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2956047?hl=en&ref_topic=1012046 are well explained two scenarios where users are more than sessions count in a Google Analytics custom report: SCENARIO 1 Session 1: User enters to Page A User navigates to Page B User navigates back to Page A End of session Session 2: ...


1

Google uses either meta tag or iframe to sense the visitor on your website. Recently for accuracy google analytics is asking all webmaster to use advance code snippet to be added on the webpages. Advanced tracking JS Head over to Google Analytics->Admin->Property->Tracking info->Tracking code and add this code to enable accurate tracking.


1

20 hours is not always enough for everything to show up in reports. It can take 24 hours and in some cases I even see it taking 48 hours. Their documentation states: Processing latency is 24-48 hours. Standard accounts that send more than 200,000 sessions per day to Google Analytics will result in the reports being refreshed only once a day. This can ...


1

I do... By that I mean that my mobile browser chrome had a new feature lately: Passing by a proxy for compressing the website before sending me the download... For that, google have multiple i.p. change for every different visits because well it's some sort of derivated proxy each time... I disabled it because it reset my loggedin credential of my coding ...


1

This coincides with recent Panda update releases. If you did not bring major modifications to your site, this could explain that. Give it another week or two and if you don't see more changes, then there is no need to worry.


1

There should be a request to _utm.gif? from the page. (See this blog post and this SO answer.) Unfortunately I can't find out if/how it's possible to know if a request has been done from a page. This code is the best I quickly found.


1

You can force to start a new session in case You need it using the sessionControl. Send a hit like : ga(‘send’, ‘pageview’, {‘sessionControl’: ‘start’}); Further info https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/analyticsjs/field-reference#sessionControl


1

This must be a clue: $_SESSION['userName'] = $row['pass']; You should also enable full error_reporting whilst developing. (It will throw up some other warnings.)


1

To answer you the main question - a "New User" in GA is a user without existing ga cookie for your website (meaning a regular visitor using private browsing for example, is counted as new user). The cookie is stored for 2 years, but using different browsers, different devices, private browsing and clearing the cookies delete the cookie, thus making the ...


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