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15

Possible advantages of having visible feed links: For visitors that know what feeds are: If they (currently) don’t use a user agent with feed autodiscovery¹, they still get informed that you offer feeds and which URLs they have. If they use a user agent with feed autodiscovery, they might not expect to find a feed on your site (and therefore don’t pay ...


11

I use RSS all the time, and I find RSS buttons on websites very useful. Simple, when I see them, I know website offer RSS, it is more intuitive way to find feeds than checking footer or something else. I usually expect RSS button to be next to social media icons/buttons, or a small/discreet icon with text somewhere in header. I guess some websites do not ...


6

Offering multiple feeds for the same entries is perfectly fine. This is commonly done to provide different formats, or, like in your case, to offer a feed with the full content and a feed with excerpts only. Another reason might be to offer feeds with different entry count (e.g., the newest 10 items, and the newest 50 items). Full content or excerpt? ...


5

It seems like you might have something like this on your site: <link rel='alternate' type='application/rss+xml' title='RSS' href='http://example.com/rss'> So search engines, RSS readers, etc... are attempting to access your /rss directory.


4

WordPress creates feeds at [site_url]/feed/ by default. Check there e.g. www.example.com/feed. There should also be a link added to all pages in the <header>: <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="website title Feed" href="[site_url]/feed/" /> The title is usually pulled from your WordPress site description, editable in admin ...


4

There are many reasons not to block your feed, but only you can know if they are relevant for you. For example: There may be bots that especially look for feeds, e.g., feed search engines. There may be bots that use feeds to discover new content. There may be other cases where bots would like to access your feeds, now and in the future. Some web search ...


4

Google doesn't typically index RSS feeds or show them in search results. You don't need to tell Google about the RSS feed in your sitemap to get it indexed. Your sitemap should contain all the URLs that are listed in your RSS feed. If your RSS feed contains content that can't be included in your sitemap, you could list your RSS feed in the sitemap so ...


3

It’s perfectly fine to offer multiple feeds. You could even offer multiple feeds for the same items, e.g., one for the full content and one for excerpts. There is nothing that would have to be changed in a feed just because there exist other feeds. So an RSS feed’s channel element would contain the same content as if the feed were the only one. Linking ...


3

My thoughts from an ecom+blog perspective: You do not need the button itself unless you want to offer something for a user using their eyes, without any helper tools alerting that RSS is available, to click into the feed. IMO the preferred way to alert automation/tools/reader-plugins that a feed is available is to use rel="alternate" link in the <head>...


3

Another approach that some people do is re-design the blog so that it looks very much like their main site (www.yourdomain.com) set up www.blog.yourdomain.com, and redirect their blog to that (including having menu bar links back to www.yourdomain.com) set up a link in their main site to the blog, pointing to www.blog.yourdomain.com. That way, visitors ...


3

Is it 'ok' to have IFrame tags in RSS feeds? Well, as the error states, "interoperability with the widest range of feed readers could be improved" ...if the iframe tag was removed. This is understandable since the main purpose of the iframe tag is to import external content from another site - this could literally be anything. Why would you want/need to do ...


3

I think a solution suggested by Tomalak should work universally. Ref: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3805050/xml-parser-error-entity-not-defined His solution was to convert character entities to corresponding numerical entities. You could HTML-parse the text and have it re-escaped with the respective numeric entities only (like: &nbsp; → &#160;)...


2

This can work - but not if you have a private blog on Blogger, because they do not have RSS feeds.


2

The official way of letting Google know of your updates is your sitemap. Submitting your Google Site's sitemap to Google Webmaster Tools On your Webmaster Tools home page, select your site. In the left sidebar, click Site configuration and then Sitemaps. Click the Add/Test Sitemap button in the top right. Enter /system/feeds/sitemap into the text box that ...


2

Placing a canonical link in RSS won't be effective. For a canonical link to work it must be in the <head> section of the document. The RSS feed would be rendered into the body of the document on another site. Google has been very clear on this point. They ensure that their implementation ignores canonical tags that are not in the proper place. ...


2

You can't. This is textbook duplicate content. Either use canonical URLs, don't let the duplicate site be crawled and indexed, or don't duplicate the site. But definitely don't expect there to be anyway to have the same content twice without being penalized for duplicate content.


2

If for no other reason, it lets people know there is a RSS feed. Whether they click on it or not doesn't matter.


2

Much of this depends upon what country you are in. In the U.S., the law is quite clear. Your scenario does not provide enough information. For example, do you have permission to use the RSS and images even if you do not cache them? The following should apply either way. Hopefully, the answer will be clear. If you are using the image for commercial use (...


2

As you've observed, Bing respects/crawls both RSS and xml sitemaps for indexing and doesn't really distinguish the two formats for priority. You could add a priority ranking/value to the rss feed urls in your xml sitemap so that Bing's bots don't crawl them with such precedence. Refer to the Sitemap XML Format standards for an example with priority setting, ...


2

RSS feeds and even sitemaps don't contribute to ranking at all. They are used by search engines to identify links to crawl and it is the pages at those links once crawled combined with valuable back links from reputable sites which contribute to your page ranking.


2

RSS (and Atom) are based on XML, so the issue you are having is that the & in the HTML entities isn't valid. Typically you can solve this by double encoding the entities so that the & becomes &amp;: &amp;eacute;. Most RSS readers will then unencode the first encoding, returning it to the original which is then handled by the HTML viewer. ...


1

After all those years, RSS has deescalated. New methods like push notifications dominated the RSS. But it doesn't mean RSS or RSS buttons are not needed anymore. RSS can be used as a mini API to interact with a website's content. I don't think there is any simpler way to do this. In regard to buttons, RSS buttons are the most compact way to notify users ...


1

The rule of thumb in this instance is that it won't increase your SERP ranking, it does in fact have the ability to reduce it. Google's Webmaster Guidelines and Duplicate Content support document specifically deal with what not to do with a website. Google does not say that you are not allowed to syndicate content (copy it from another website) at all as ...


1

I would completely noIndex and nofollow it. Because IT is just an Asset providing no additional seo value, But producing dc.


1

I think you have nothing to worry about in general, since Google crawls sites daily, it will know that you have indeed placed the content first and will not ding you for duplicate content. I would however suggest you add a delay to RSS feed for 2-3 days so you indeed get crawled first. Unfortunately you can not add any links that a site admin does not have ...


1

I do like creativity but, I'm afraid the idea just doesn't make sense to me. When you set up an RSS feed, you want the links to actually point to your site, not apply a nofollow to them. Also, links that have nofollow applied will cause search engine robots not to scan them and if the resulting pages are very high quality with advertisements in your name, ...


1

RSS does not allow for nofollow. RSS is not HTML but a simple mark-up for Really Simple Syndication. The documentation for RSS 2.0 can be found here: http://validator.w3.org/feed/docs/rss2.html It will contain much of the latest information you need.


1

You could create a RSS XML page with static content indicating there is no feed available. Something like this: <rss version="2.0" xmlns:content="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/" xmlns:wfw="http://wellformedweb.org/CommentAPI/" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" xmlns:sy="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/...


1

To make content on the internet private, you need to protect it with user names and passwords. Ensure that only logged in users with permissions can view the content. You could implement basic authentacation via your .htaccess file or use one of several WordPress plugins such as this one.


1

Seems I was right about Feedly waiting to pick up the new URL. It took over a full day but new posts are finally showing up. I guess just letting Ghost do a 301 is the proper solution, after all.


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