9

The current GoogleBot Smartphone agent, as tested with the 'Fetch as Google' Tool is essentially a fake iPhone using a headless Webkit Engine, running on a Linux x86_64 desktop machine. The default non-responsive viewport width is that of an iPhone at 980px. With a viewport <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"> applied, ...


7

You're confusion lies in the fact that you are incorrect in saying that pixels aren't physical. Physically, your monitor has LEDs of 3 different colors (red, green, blue). Each set of these three colored LEDs is a pixel (how they are arranged can make even this concept much more complicated but lets think of them all being perfectly square and all one unit ...


5

Users almost never resize a window while using your site. It is often possible for the resizing itself to cause problems. This is especially the case when you use JavaScript to calculate and set some sizes when the window loads. Some frameworks rely on that technique and it makes resized-on-the-fly window look pretty broken. When you are testing you ...


5

That entirely depends on your user base, for a commercial site I work on 1024x768 represents 9.49% (166,453) of our visitors, we will continue to support that for some time. The flip side to that, a hobby project that I work on has a different audience and I don't support 1024x768 as it only represents about 2%. Check your existing stats and use that to ...


5

There are up-to-date stats at http://gs.statcounter.com/ Just select "Screen resolution" from the stat dropdown. At the time of this writing, it seems that 1366 * 768 is the rage.


4

For responsive purposes, you can use the devices resolution conventions: By using these dimensions, you cover a maximum of devices.


4

Google's bots do not view a page in any resolution due to the fact they do not render the page as you would expect from a browser, therefor resolution is irevelant but you should aim for standard media queries that support a range of devices. Google's mobile bot will view the media queries you have in the CSS file and estiblish from the Max-width resolution ...


3

Only one version of the image should be included in your image sitemap. You can submit whichever size version you prefer, however, particularly when using common CMSes which auto-resize your images as required, this is usually the original version of the file which should be correctly sized as the largest version of the file required on your site. If you ...


2

I would recommend you to use a responsive theme for your site or make your site responsive. This way you can eliminate all the possibilities of resolution problems. eg: Wikipedia uses responsive design To try how this resposnive design in Wikipedia works just adjust your browser sizez and see how the site adapts to that browser size .


2

The average user may be on anything from a small cellphone to a 4k television. You should therefore design your website to run on any size screen, intelligently. Usually this is referred to as 'responsive' design, and there are a lot of great frameworks that'll help you do that (Bootstrap, Zhurb Foundation, HTML5 Boilerplate). On small screens, hide "...


2

I think we should start from these facts: This algorithmic change noticeably affects less than 1% of searches globally. ... On a typical website, it can take several weeks for Googlebot to crawl and process enough pages to reflect layout changes on the site. http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.it/2012/01/page-layout-algorithm-improvement.html I ...


2

There is a difference between the physical pixels that iPhone 6 plus can display and the screen size. Screen size is the pixel size that affects your CSS media query. IPhone 6 plus has screen size of 414 x 736 Pixel and browser window size a bit different due to menu space. Good explanation can be found here: http://www.kylejlarson.com/blog/2015/iphone-6-...


2

Your Mac is probably retina, which means it uses twice the amount of pixels to display things. Some articles with more information: http://blog.endpoint.com/2014/05/supporting-apple-retina-displays-on-web.html http://www.leemunroe.com/designing-for-high-resolution-retina-displays/ You can emulate retina displays on Windows in Firefox by changing the pixel ...


2

This might not be a real answer, just an opinion. Every web developer should decide if they "need" a feature. In my opinion, the unit itself is a bad implementation. DPI is a unit intended for print, specifically a unit to measure the capability of a printer to produce a small dot. But in electronic mediums we have not a dot, we have a pixel, which has ...


1

Nowhere has Google mentioned not to resize SVGs in their public documentation/comments. The whole point of SVGs is that you can resize them easily while maintaining a low transfer overhead and high quality. While generally it's bad practice to distort image quality by resizing jpgs or pngs, there's no logical reason for them to penalise SVGs being used as ...


1

Domain name being private has no impact on propagation. When I go to your site, it shows this error message from cPanel: "There has been a server misconfiguration. You must verify that your hosting provider has the correct IP address configured for your Apache settings and DNS records. A restart of Apache may be required for new settings to take affect."...


1

You will not find a resolution that will fit all or one that works far better than others, you will need to use media queries or agent sniffing to detect which phone is being used. It is now common to see smartphones using desktop resolutions, especially when the device is in landscape. Many smart phones sold in the last few years are capable of FHD (1080p),...


1

Nothing. This will go away when Google retests the page. I went through some of this by the thousands. It has been since at least early May that all of the errors have been fixed, and still there is about 125 remaining as of this morning. It takes time of course, however, Google does say it is a priority to retest mobile pages. However, it may be that as ...


1

Definitely not all when you consider many of the Samsung Galaxy tablets have a width of only 600px. And then there's my desktop monitor which is 1920px making your width about 1/3 of its width (if I were to view the browser full size). http://screensiz.es/tablet As you can see, this is a problem all developers face and why responsive is the only real ...


1

The operating system must be able to change the resoution, because it must support different displays. But each LCD monitor has a native resolution, and only when you use this resolution, the picture looks sharp. If you use another resolution, for example 640*480 on a 1024*728 Monitor, then the monitor itself will upscale the picture, so that 1 original ...


1

From The 72 PPI Web Resolution Myth: The size at which an image appears on your screen depends only on two things – the pixel dimensions of the image and the display resolution of your screen. As long as you’ve set your screen to its native display resolution...then an image will be displayed pixel-for-pixel. In other words, each pixel in the image will ...


1

Turns out multiple resolutions from a single visitor/browser is completely possible. Google Analytics asks the browser for the screen.width variable, which IE (and apparently Firefox) change when the user zooms in. Sources: Answer on related technical question I posted on StackOverflow w3schools screen.width TryIt javascript snippet (try hit "submit code"...


1

Firefox now has this feature built in. Under "Web Developer" click "Reponsive Design View"


1

I wondered if you wanted a techique to make your site always display xyz pixels wide? If so, I added this to my .css ..#Content { width:985px; margin:0px auto; text-align:left; } Then in my html used: ..body> ..div id="Content"> This is all crude, my point is that if you want this, it can be done, and other will show you how to do it ...


1

You can use tools such as http://quirktools.com/screenfly/ or http://resolutiontester.com/ to see your website in various resolutions


1

Decrease the height of your browser window until you've got the right aspect ratio and then set your browser zoom to something less than 100%. You'll have to do the maths to work out what this would represent for non-zoomed windows.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible