Hot answers tagged

15

Yes, there are privacy concerns with using Google Web Fonts. If you have strict privacy concerns you should probably not use the service. Users of Google Web Fonts are bound by Google's generic API terms of service, which includes this clause: By using our APIs, you agree that Google can use submitted information in accordance with our privacy policies, ...


8

According to Judge William A. Fletcher's opinion on Office Depot v. Zuccarini, the jurisdiction over a domain name is dependant on the jurisdiction of the domain name registry. The registry for .com domains is VeriSign, which is headquartered in Virginia, USA. Assuming that the judge's opinion is still applicable, this means the jurisdiction of .com domain ...


6

There are two commonly-used methods of maintaining privacy in domain registrations: Privacy services offered by the registrar. These services are independent of ICANN but regulated by them through policy. ICANN does require that registrars send private registration data to the shared registry, meaning that ICANN has access to that data, but they only reveal ...


6

1. Serverside - block Search Engines Create a robots.txt file in your root directory and add this text to it: User-agent: * Disallow: / Theoretically, This should block all search engines (the ones that honour robots.txt). 2. Know how Search Engines are crawling your site and control your site's visibility. Since you want it to be extremely private, I ...


6

Currently my website is under maintenance. If your website is only temporarily "under maintenance" and has already been live and indexed by search engines then you should consider returning a "503 Service Unavailable" HTTP response code with perhaps a Retry-After HTTP header indicating when the site is expected to be available again. ...


5

The new registrar will send an "approval request" (that is what GoDaddy calls it) to your previous (current at the time) registrar. Here is the important part. If the privacy service of the previous (current at the time) registrar forwards the "approval request" then you will probably be able to do the transfer without disabling privacy. Many privacy ...


5

Google's John Mueller (who also contributes on this site) has said that private registration won't hurt your rankings. He cautions that using private registration would make it harder for Google to contact you if there is a problem with your site. (So maybe you should sign up for Google Webmaster Tools.) There are also reports from webmasters that use ...


4

With regards to displaying email addresses, it is worth considering methods to prevent their being easily harvested for spamming. The email address I use only for WHOIS records on my domains receives thousands of spam emails a day, mostly from free email accounts (e.g. gmail and similar) with people saying they can help design my website or improve my SEO ...


4

Disqus has its own Privacy Policy that you can link to from your own Privacy Policy so that you can inform users that Disqus, a third-party you use, may collect personal data through the embeddable commenting plugin. Disqus discloses what kind of personal data it collects at the "Personally Identifiable Information" clause: And Disqus links to its Privacy ...


4

The buttons themselves don't need to be loaded from the social site at all. For example, both Facebook and Twitter let you simply open a window with a special URL, which shows a "New post" window with your page's URL already filled in. For Facebook, the documented URL appears to be: https://www.facebook.com/dialog/share?app_id=<APPID>&display=...


3

Terms of Services and Privacy Policies depend on the legal entity behind a website. They shouldn't be done based on how domain or subdomain are structured. I mean: if your forum is managed and owned by the same entity of the main domain, you don't need to have them separate. It's enough to have 1 privacy policy and 1 terms of service page. But remember ...


3

A hosted WordPress.com blog would already seem to offer all the privacy settings you would need. Not only can this block the content from search engines, but can also be set to "invite only": Source: Site Visibility - Privacy Settings


3

They don't.. I manage an Arabic baby web site where 90% of the users are supposedly male.. hmm? So male Arabs are looking at a baby website???! NO they probably have wives who log on using their accounts.. It's a meaningless statisitic


3

I recommend having a third party come and audit your systems and provide you a summary of compliance, which you can share with your customers. When I say third party, I mean a separate security company that specialise in IT security audits. ISO27001 compliance is normally a good place to start when seeking to prove security controls are in place. It doesn't ...


3

Below is a list of websites, that track your visitors activity when you choose to use Disqus: google-analytics.com connect.facebook.net accounts.google.com pippio.com bluekai.com crwdcntrl.net exelator.com doubleclick.net tag.apxlv.net adnxs.com rlcdn.com adbrn.com nexac.com tapad.com liadm.com sohern.com demdex.net bidswitch.net mathtag.com


3

Some domain registrars, like NameSilo, let you transfer a domain to another user of the same registrar without any knowledge of the receiving party except for their username. Your best bet is for both of you to create accounts with a registrar that supports this feature, signing up with usernames that are not connected to your real identities. Then the ...


2

It's not always possible, for example GoDaddy prevents transfers away from them without disabling the privacy protection first (docs): You can't transfer your domain [...] if your domain has Ownership Protection. There's also a "helpful" message about this when you turn it off: Turning off privacy exposes your contact info to the public. Once it's out ...


2

Regarding the fonts as an aesthetic element as well as the main element for readability, you may consider using the Core fonts for the Web, which basically is a set of very common fonts that you can find on almost any device, and if those fonts are not present, there are many possible alternatives available on each device. I'd recommend using those font so ...


2

In the U.S.? Nothing. Sorta. A privacy policy is a good idea and helps trust organizations such as eTrust evaluate your site for trust. It also helps the site user. I always read the privacy policy when any account or PII (personally identifiable information) is taken. The exception is where a site engages in marketing and serving to children 13 and under. ...


2

You should investigate as to which ads are being blocked. Then the question might turn into: "Adblock blocks a lot of resources that aren't ads".


2

According to ICANN, A Proxy Service registers the domain name itself and licenses use of the domain name to its customer. The contact information of the service provider is displayed rather than the customer’s contact information. The Proxy Service provider maintains all rights as a registrant (such as to manage, renew, transfer and delete the ...


2

Have you considered changing your private info before disabling the protection? You could try renting a P.O. box during the transition to use (or equivalent if outside the US) so that your personal address is not exposed. Similar, you can use a disposable email to prevent your personal email from being exposed. Once the transfer is complete, you can change ...


2

If the previous (current at the time) registrar's privacy service forwards email sent to the account in the domain registration then it might be possible to do the transfer without disabling privacy. The new registrar will send an "approval request" (that is what GoDaddy calls it) to the previous (current at the time) registrar. If the privacy service of ...


2

Users, google and other major search engines are able to detect finger prints from a variety of methods. Simply adding a dedicated IP is not enough, especially if the IP is provided by the same IP block chain. To reduce the finger prints your site must use the following: a different name server, or use one that is used by hundreds to thousands of customers,...


2

You need to look at: Your home country laws on privacy, i.e. India The country where you host/collect/process data through, i.e. USA The countries where your customers are, i.e. USA, Canada, EU You can look at India IT Act of 2000 act for how to comply, i.e. monitor user-generated content, follow best practices on privacy and user data etc. USA has two ...


2

Google requires all businesses to have a telephone number for customers, without one it is not possible to have your site listed, even cash machines, video rental kiosks and express mail dropboxes require a number. Eligible businesses In order to qualify for a Google My Business listing, a business must make in-person contact with customers during ...


2

If your shared hosting provider uses cPanel and you use cPanel to manage your website, cPanel has the function to automatically delete old log files after 30 days. Screenshot from the "Raw Access" page of cPanel; note the "Remove the previous month's archived logs from your home directory" option:


2

You should look at what “legitimate interests” are under GDPR: https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/legitimate-interests/when-can-we-rely-on-legitimate-interests/ ICO provides a really good checklist what legitimate interests are and when you can rely on this: You can rely on legitimate interests for ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible