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13

Yes, there are privacy concerns with using Google Web Fonts. If you have strict privacy concerns you should probably not use the service. Users of Google Web Fonts are bound by Google's generic API terms of service, which includes this clause: By using our APIs, you agree that Google can use submitted information in accordance with our privacy policies, ...


8

Without additional safety, no. Random URLs are crawled all the time. However, this is good when done with a sign-on page to authenticate the user. An intermediate solution is to make sure the status page contains no personal data, only general info. For example, 'PAID BY CC' rather than 'PAID by VISA 1234567891' and 'Shipped' instead of 'Shipped to John Doe,...


8

According to Judge William A. Fletcher's opinion on Office Depot v. Zuccarini, the jurisdiction over a domain name is dependant on the jurisdiction of the domain name registry. The registry for .com domains is VeriSign, which is headquartered in Virginia, USA. Assuming that the judge's opinion is still applicable, this means the jurisdiction of .com domain ...


6

1. Serverside - block Search Engines Create a robots.txt file in your root directory and add this text to it: User-agent: * Disallow: / Theoretically, This should block all search engines (the ones that honour robots.txt). 2. Know how Search Engines are crawling your site and control your site's visibility. Since you want it to be extremely private, I ...


6

Currently my website is under maintenance. If your website is only temporarily "under maintenance" and has already been live and indexed by search engines then you should consider returning a "503 Service Unavailable" HTTP response code with perhaps a Retry-After HTTP header indicating when the site is expected to be available again. Instead of simply ...


6

Google just recently released a video on this exact subject: How does duplicate copy that's legally required (ie Terms & Conditions across multiple offers) affect performance in search? So the answer from the horses mouth is I wouldn't stress about that.


6

There are two commonly-used methods of maintaining privacy in domain registrations: Privacy services offered by the registrar. These services are independent of ICANN but regulated by them through policy. ICANN does require that registrars send private registration data to the shared registry, meaning that ICANN has access to that data, but they only reveal ...


5

Google's John Mueller (who also contributes on this site) has said that private registration won't hurt your rankings. He cautions that using private registration would make it harder for Google to contact you if there is a problem with your site. (So maybe you should sign up for Google Webmaster Tools.) There are also reports from webmasters that use ...


4

The new registrar will send an "approval request" (that is what GoDaddy calls it) to your previous (current at the time) registrar. Here is the important part. If the privacy service of the previous (current at the time) registrar forwards the "approval request" then you will probably be able to do the transfer without disabling privacy. Many privacy ...


4

You should have a privacy policy and a "contact us" page. It's unclear if Google specifically boosts sites with these type of pages, but I find it plausible that they do. Users trust a site more if these pages exist. Especially the contact page. Even if Google doesn't specifically have an algorithmic factor for these pages, they certainly pay attention ...


4

Using Google Analytics is not unethical Google Analytics does not track Google accounts. GA uses a special set of cookies _ga, __utma, __utmb, __utmv and __utmz to track user activity. And Google Analytics does not allow individual users to be "traced" any more than they would otherwise without GA present. Perfect privacy on the web is impossible Whether ...


4

With regards to displaying email addresses, it is worth considering methods to prevent their being easily harvested for spamming. The email address I use only for WHOIS records on my domains receives thousands of spam emails a day, mostly from free email accounts (e.g. gmail and similar) with people saying they can help design my website or improve my SEO ...


4

The buttons themselves don't need to be loaded from the social site at all. For example, both Facebook and Twitter let you simply open a window with a special URL, which shows a "New post" window with your page's URL already filled in. For Facebook, the documented URL appears to be: https://www.facebook.com/dialog/share?app_id=<APPID>&display=...


3

They don't.. I manage an Arabic baby web site where 90% of the users are supposedly male.. hmm? So male Arabs are looking at a baby website???! NO they probably have wives who log on using their accounts.. It's a meaningless statisitic


3

A hosted WordPress.com blog would already seem to offer all the privacy settings you would need. Not only can this block the content from search engines, but can also be set to "invite only": Source: Site Visibility - Privacy Settings


3

Don't confuse the words Anonymous and Track-able Any form of communication can be traced and extends further than the use of Google Analytics, you are miss understanding what they refer to 'anonymously'. What they are implying is that the data you input or provide will not be shared to the public nor will they ask for your name. Making a telephone call is ...


3

To be honest, if it says "anonymous" (and that term is up for debate anyway), I'd expect it to be 100% anonymous. No Google Analytics, no Clicktale, no Piwik, no Facebook Beacons nor any other type of data gathering mechanisms. Now, of course, most website visitors wouldn't have a clue what is going on under the hood, therefore I'd expect the site provider ...


3

The dot PRO domain names have tighter rules compared to the likes of .com, .org, .net. currently and most likely indefinite you can not use private whois information on any PRO domain names from any Registrars. This is set by Afilias and makes sense because entities are validated by government certification which is periodically checked against whois data. I ...


3

Terms of Services and Privacy Policies depend on the legal entity behind a website. They shouldn't be done based on how domain or subdomain are structured. I mean: if your forum is managed and owned by the same entity of the main domain, you don't need to have them separate. It's enough to have 1 privacy policy and 1 terms of service page. But remember ...


3

I recommend having a third party come and audit your systems and provide you a summary of compliance, which you can share with your customers. When I say third party, I mean a separate security company that specialise in IT security audits. ISO27001 compliance is normally a good place to start when seeking to prove security controls are in place. It doesn't ...


3

Disqus has its own Privacy Policy that you can link to from your own Privacy Policy so that you can inform users that Disqus, a third-party you use, may collect personal data through the embeddable commenting plugin. Disqus discloses what kind of personal data it collects at the "Personally Identifiable Information" clause: And Disqus links to its Privacy ...


3

Some domain registrars, like NameSilo, let you transfer a domain to another user of the same registrar without any knowledge of the receiving party except for their username. Your best bet is for both of you to create accounts with a registrar that supports this feature, signing up with usernames that are not connected to your real identities. Then the ...


2

The laws and acts that governs data protection and emailing various from country to country, while a lot of them change from country to country most say among the same thing and you will need to learn the key points of these and its far to many to list but for example. Not keeping peoples data on file for more than 2 years, you are responsible for safe ...


2

If your campaigns are merely controversial you should be fine as it would be exceedingly hard to determine the owner of a S3 account merely from the URL (assuming, of course, you don't do something completely moronic like use your full name for the bucket). You may also want to make sure that neither your username/email address associated with the account ...


2

You're right. By simplicity, many webmasters use generator to generate privacy policy webpage and it leads to duplicate content issues. Moreover, for "Contact us" webpage in general, there is no big content and just a contact form. For your "Privacy policy" webpage, I recommend to write your own text (see a specialized lawyer to help you). And for your "...


2

Regarding the fonts as an aesthetic element as well as the main element for readability, you may consider using the Core fonts for the Web, which basically is a set of very common fonts that you can find on almost any device, and if those fonts are not present, there are many possible alternatives available on each device. I'd recommend using those font so ...


2

In the U.S.? Nothing. Sorta. A privacy policy is a good idea and helps trust organizations such as eTrust evaluate your site for trust. It also helps the site user. I always read the privacy policy when any account or PII (personally identifiable information) is taken. The exception is where a site engages in marketing and serving to children 13 and under. ...


2

It's not always possible, for example GoDaddy prevents transfers away from them without disabling the privacy protection first (docs): You can't transfer your domain [...] if your domain has Ownership Protection. There's also a "helpful" message about this when you turn it off: Turning off privacy exposes your contact info to the public. Once it's out ...


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