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112

Summary Minimising the attack vectors by not registering a domain, not registering hosting, not using a credit card linked to your name, not openly giving out your IP and email address, not using Google Analytics, and not discussing your new project openly will each reduce the chance of your identity being discovered. How might your identity be discovered? ...


19

The Whois privacy is barely a protection - most registrars will surrender your personal details at the first request. Well, perhaps at the second. Anyway, the point is, they are generally unwilling to take risk and get under fire so they won't bother to investigate who is right and who is wrong for a client that perhaps only brings $5/month of revenues. ...


11

It's potentially illegal and also morally wrong. Basically, if you would be unhappy for someone to read your private messages then it's wrong (morally) and I suspect it would be considered criminal under one of these Canadian Laws (technically the crime would be committed at the location of the server):- Section 342 of the Criminal Code of Canada (deals ...


11

Yes, there are privacy concerns with using Google Web Fonts. If you have strict privacy concerns you should probably not use the service. Users of Google Web Fonts are bound by Google's generic API terms of service, which includes this clause: By using our APIs, you agree that Google can use submitted information in accordance with our privacy policies, ...


9

According to Judge William A. Fletcher's opinion on Office Depot v. Zuccarini, the jurisdiction over a domain name is dependant on the jurisdiction of the domain name registry. The registry for .com domains is VeriSign, which is headquartered in Virginia, USA. Assuming that the judge's opinion is still applicable, this means the jurisdiction of .com domain ...


8

Your boss is paranoid. Reading emails for the sake of SEO spam control is not something Google is doing. If they were caught doing that the Department of Justice would come down so hard on them they'd be lucky if they survived.


8

Without additional safety, no. Random URLs are crawled all the time. However, this is good when done with a sign-on page to authenticate the user. An intermediate solution is to make sure the status page contains no personal data, only general info. For example, 'PAID BY CC' rather than 'PAID by VISA 1234567891' and 'Shipped' instead of 'Shipped to John Doe,...


6

Use a Hidden Service on the Tor-network with a .onion-domain. Unless you give out personal details yourself, it's impossible to trace back to you.


6

Google just recently released a video on this exact subject: How does duplicate copy that's legally required (ie Terms & Conditions across multiple offers) affect performance in search? So the answer from the horses mouth is I wouldn't stress about that.


6

Currently my website is under maintenance. If your website is only temporarily "under maintenance" and has already been live and indexed by search engines then you should consider returning a "503 Service Unavailable" HTTP response code with perhaps a Retry-After HTTP header indicating when the site is expected to be available again. Instead of simply ...


6

1. Serverside - block Search Engines Create a robots.txt file in your root directory and add this text to it: User-agent: * Disallow: / Theoretically, This should block all search engines (the ones that honour robots.txt). 2. Know how Search Engines are crawling your site and control your site's visibility. Since you want it to be extremely private, I ...


6

There are two commonly-used methods of maintaining privacy in domain registrations: Privacy services offered by the registrar. These services are independent of ICANN but regulated by them through policy. ICANN does require that registrars send private registration data to the shared registry, meaning that ICANN has access to that data, but they only reveal ...


5

As long as your privacy policy properly disclose what you track, and you don't misuse the information, there shouldn't be any problem.


5

Google's John Mueller (who also contributes on this site) has said that private registration won't hurt your rankings. He cautions that using private registration would make it harder for Google to contact you if there is a problem with your site. (So maybe you should sign up for Google Webmaster Tools.) There are also reports from webmasters that use ...


4

No, Adsense does not send the content of every page to Google - that would be pretty inefficient and hog a lot of bandwidth - and in fact is not technically possible with cross-domain restrictions. Instead, the Adsense crawler (different from the normal Googlebot crawler) visits the page separately and decides what the context of the page is. Then when a ...


4

There is a blogger, writer and scientist in the UK who went by the nom de plume of Belle de Jour - because she wrote about being a practicing prostitute. She wrote a book (and some more later) and her book was made into two TV series. She remained completely anonymous for a very long time before she was outed. The way she did it is detailed here. The ...


4

The whois protection is good enough as far as I know. Obviously this is true for normal people. If police or similar will require your data, they will take them easily.


4

What kind of information can websites collect about someone (someone's computer or device) when they visit your website? I know we log IP's, and can determine your zipcode, OS, browser type and native language but what else? Off the top of my head - Your IP. From your IP, location information, sometimes down to city level, sometimes not. Sometimes ...


4

Using Google Analytics is not unethical Google Analytics does not track Google accounts. GA uses a special set of cookies _ga, __utma, __utmb, __utmv and __utmz to track user activity. And Google Analytics does not allow individual users to be "traced" any more than they would otherwise without GA present. Perfect privacy on the web is impossible Whether ...


4

With regards to displaying email addresses, it is worth considering methods to prevent their being easily harvested for spamming. The email address I use only for WHOIS records on my domains receives thousands of spam emails a day, mostly from free email accounts (e.g. gmail and similar) with people saying they can help design my website or improve my SEO ...


4

The buttons themselves don't need to be loaded from the social site at all. For example, both Facebook and Twitter let you simply open a window with a special URL, which shows a "New post" window with your page's URL already filled in. For Facebook, the documented URL appears to be: https://www.facebook.com/dialog/share?app_id=<APPID>&display=...


3

I would not go with a 404 page. A 404 page is not just page, but also a response. It lets the client know that the page was not found. That it was somehow deleted or the url is wrong. If you are using some sort of session to hide information that is availabe only to logged in users, then you can use your server side scripting language of choice, (asp, ...


3

The new registrar will send an "approval request" (that is what GoDaddy calls it) to your previous (current at the time) registrar. Here is the important part. If the privacy service of the previous (current at the time) registrar forwards the "approval request" then you will probably be able to do the transfer without disabling privacy. Many privacy ...


3

This is a good question but I would have to agree with Pekka. Perhaps you may not realize the consequences of doing so. For example say you visit one of the many many sites that use jQuery from the Google CDN. If this site just happens to not be coded in manner that makes it gracefully degrade (ie. bad coding standards) then you may be stuck on the home page ...


3

The dot PRO domain names have tighter rules compared to the likes of .com, .org, .net. currently and most likely indefinite you can not use private whois information on any PRO domain names from any Registrars. This is set by Afilias and makes sense because entities are validated by government certification which is periodically checked against whois data. I ...


3

To be honest, if it says "anonymous" (and that term is up for debate anyway), I'd expect it to be 100% anonymous. No Google Analytics, no Clicktale, no Piwik, no Facebook Beacons nor any other type of data gathering mechanisms. Now, of course, most website visitors wouldn't have a clue what is going on under the hood, therefore I'd expect the site provider ...


3

Don't confuse the words Anonymous and Track-able Any form of communication can be traced and extends further than the use of Google Analytics, you are miss understanding what they refer to 'anonymously'. What they are implying is that the data you input or provide will not be shared to the public nor will they ask for your name. Making a telephone call is ...


3

You should have a privacy policy and a "contact us" page. It's unclear if Google specifically boosts sites with these type of pages, but I find it plausible that they do. Users trust a site more if these pages exist. Especially the contact page. Even if Google doesn't specifically have an algorithmic factor for these pages, they certainly pay attention ...


3

They don't.. I manage an Arabic baby web site where 90% of the users are supposedly male.. hmm? So male Arabs are looking at a baby website???! NO they probably have wives who log on using their accounts.. It's a meaningless statisitic


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