5

Your arguments against not blocking the indexing of these legal pages are valid. Matt Cuts did a video about this very topic here in 2009: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unEML5n5vTo While it's not a clear "yes" or "no" from Google, the second important question to ask is "are these pages important to my users?". If yes, Google needs to find them. Based ...


4

If your site is handling personal data then it must (i.e. its practices for handling personal data must) comply with EU data protection laws (see the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC for the definition of personal data). However, there is nowhere in the European Union a requirement for a website to have its privacy policy posted - except for "cookies". ...


4

Updating with some new answers, since the law is changing fast in this area: Docracy has open sourced its own terms and various privacy policies specific to mobile apps, annotations included. We also published a drafting guide. Other companies that famously allow intelligent copying of their terms are Quora and Wordpress. There are some free and paid privacy ...


4

You're subject to the laws of the Country where your business is legally based and/or bases the operations. Cross-country legal enforcement (privacy in particular) lives in a grey area and - for example - big companies like Facebook or Google do not always comply with EU privacy laws. For EU companies, servers' location only matters in case you move the data ...


4

Morgan Lewis is a law firm with offices in the UK and they have published information (as of 2012 which is the most recent authoritative publication I can find on the subject) on the ICO's guidance on deleting personal data under the DPA 1998. According to their legal assessment of the guidance the ICO recognized the difficulty in deleting electronic data ...


4

Method 2 Following the concept of method 1 (below), I realised this could probably be done with just one technology and without reloading the current page. It's all done client side with plain javascript. <!DOCTYPE html> <head> </head> <body> <a href="https://validator.w3.org" id="allowReferrer">Link that you do want to ...


3

The Google Analytics terms of service actually require you to do that: You must post a Privacy Policy and that Privacy Policy must provide notice of Your use of cookies that are used to collect data. You must disclose the use of Google Analytics, and how it collects and processes data.


3

Terms of Services and Privacy Policies depend on the legal entity behind a website. They shouldn't be done based on how domain or subdomain are structured. I mean: if your forum is managed and owned by the same entity of the main domain, you don't need to have them separate. It's enough to have 1 privacy policy and 1 terms of service page. But remember ...


3

"Does my website have to publish a privacy policy?" What Gisle Hannemyr's comment states might be misleading. Technically speaking you need to inform your users, but the standard way to do so is by having a privacy policy posted on your website. As further addition, consider that the California Online Privacy Protection Act (in practice reflecting on any ...


3

Google just changed its privacy policies (so there might still be inconsistencies). here's an email I received from google a few days ago: Dear Google user, We're getting rid of over 60 different privacy policies across Google and replacing them with one that's a lot shorter and easier to read. Our new policy covers multiple products and features, ...


3

You didn't mention if you gonna have English visitors too or not, but these legal information is meant to be accessible for your visitors, what is point of having it on your website if your users can't understand it?! Your website should provide the necessary legal information for all targeted visitors. Since all mentioned targets are EU members, your ...


2

Every website using Google Analytics is required to provide a privacy policy. You can generate a Google Analytics compliant privacy policy with iubenda: http://www.iubenda.com (I'm the founder ;) )


2

Why you don't generate one with one of the free tools available??, may take no more than half an hour, google for privacy policy generator. Kudos for coding your own forums, sometimes reinventing the wheel is good. !


2

If you use Adsense ads on your site, you are required by Google to have a privacy policy per the Adsense terms of service. From http://support.google.com/adsense/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=48182: AdSense publishers must have and abide by a privacy policy that discloses that third parties may be placing and reading cookies on your users' browsers, or ...


2

In the U.S.? Nothing. Sorta. A privacy policy is a good idea and helps trust organizations such as eTrust evaluate your site for trust. It also helps the site user. I always read the privacy policy when any account or PII (personally identifiable information) is taken. The exception is where a site engages in marketing and serving to children 13 and under. ...


2

I'm the founder of a service for generating privacy policies, which happens to be based in Italy, so I know very well Italian laws on the topic. In your case and according to Italian laws, the Data Controller - Titolare del Trattamento in Italian - must be mentioned in the privacy policy (or by any other means of informing the data subject/user about its ...


2

The question is if you're storing any information from users or not? I think if you're using FB you don't need to make users accept anything, but, generally when someone uses a site, they're agreeing to their terms, even if they don't accept anything literally. So IMO you should be fine as long as your privacy policy is accessible easily for all users.


2

The laws and acts that governs data protection and emailing various from country to country, while a lot of them change from country to country most say among the same thing and you will need to learn the key points of these and its far to many to list but for example. Not keeping peoples data on file for more than 2 years, you are responsible for safe ...


2

You need to look at: Your home country laws on privacy, i.e. India The country where you host/collect/process data through, i.e. USA The countries where your customers are, i.e. USA, Canada, EU You can look at India IT Act of 2000 act for how to comply, i.e. monitor user-generated content, follow best practices on privacy and user data etc. USA has two ...


2

You could add a "Log Data" clause in your Privacy Policy to inform users that your web server will collect this data automatically. An example of this kind of clause: There are certain examples of Privacy Policies where the website does not collect personal data, but these examples are very limited as most websites will collect at least some pieces of data ...


2

across the EU there is a concept that allows you to send emails to a list without their permission, but that's still based on prior permission. It's known as 'soft opt-in'. It applies if the following conditions are met; where you've obtained a person's details in the course of a sale or negotiations for a sale of a product or service; where the messages ...


1

According to https://www.cookielaw.org/faq/#WereoutsideoftheEUareweaffected technically you don't need to display the cookie consent banner as you do not legally have an entity within the EU, the site is not hosted and domains not registered within the EU zone. I would always recommend a privacy policy as it helps establish trust between you and your target ...


1

Technically, EU privacy policy is strictly for web pages within EU. So, you don't need to put it quite frankly. But... make your privacy policy for the web, look how are they written, then you write it for yourself for your page. But, then again, you don't need to do that for Indian domains.


1

You don't need to have separate Privacy Policy and/or Terms of Use. These legal agreements are binding between the company that operates the website/mobile app and users. If multiple subdomains and main websites are operated and owned by the same company, then the company can have just one Privacy Policy and one Terms of Use. What you should look after is:...


1

While the EU law states that it covers sites aimed at EU users if you are not specifically targeting EU users then you should have no issues. Even assuming you do need to comply with the EU directive automated testing tools have no way to identify the difference between a security capture page and the standard site. You should be able to safely ignore that ...


1

I agree with closetnoc, full disclosure is the best policy (but keep it brief). The fact that you include GA on your site means that you are intending to use the data it collects, not to mention that Google gets to look at the data too. The privacy policy has to do with the users of your website, not where their private data is stored. Their data is being ...


1

Probably, yes. However, it is only one page so by itself it won't hurt you. If you have lots of pages with duplicate/low quality content this just makes it worse by adding another page to the mix. You can always block that page from being crawled and indexed with robots.txt and x-robots.tag to prevent Google from considering that page in its algorithm or ...


1

Here's where it gets tricky: You can't identify individual users in Google Analytics for Personal Identifable Information. (PII). However, if you already explicitly storing user data you can 'do the math' on it and identify the User's individual behaviour (i.e. users who have been on page orderid=211, you can view that user's behaviour with simple analytics ...


1

DISCLAIMER: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. For legal advice, get a lawyer. First, it is against the Google Analytics TOS to identify users through it. (See cutroni.com). Even without that, you need a user's permission to store their personal data. If you have something that covers that in your privacy policy, you may be ok. I don't know EU ...


1

There are websites that generate the policy for you after filling some basic forms. Here is one of them. If there are no logins involved, you should be great with this one.


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