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5

The best solution I can think of is to use Twitter cards. This will mean though, that you would have to create a page for each image that you'd like Tweet-able - you may be able to get around this with some sort of lightbox iframe. <meta name="twitter:image:src" content="IMAGESOURCE"> It looks like a lot of people are searching for the same thing as ...


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On any page that uses the content licensed under the CC Attribution 2.0 Generic licence must contain the link to that license and the appropriate credit. If you use a lot of content under this license you might find it easier to put the link to the license on every page, most likely in a footer. But the attribution must be specific for each piece of content ...


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That is pretty much what people - including me - do. Take a descriptive name but eventually there will be a conflict since many times people have photos of the subject in slightly different poses. One way to go further is to make the name more descriptive some metadata to it such as the time or the photographer's name like: cat_eating_mouse_by_joe.jpg or ...


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The only issue I can see on that URL is that you're missing width and height attributes on the big image at the top. This means after getting the HTML page, the browser has to wait for the image to download and then re-render the page, since it has no way of knowing how much space to allow for the image until it has the whole file. That may be what Insights ...


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As @DominiqueH points out, even when you are not commercially benefitting from the images, there are copyright issues to consider when using images from other websites. If you really feel you need to use images on their website, I would advise contacting the website owner first and ask if you can use them. Be specific on what images you wish to use and how....


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Usually not. Each picture has copyrights and usages that are decided by the author. But you can find online many images that are legally free of right that you can reuse. On Google Image Search you can use the Usage Right filter and see only the image you have the right to copy.


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You can follow Google Image Publishing Guideline First. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/114016?hl=en&vid=0-1401327443069-1512401881759 You can make them unique by using a dash (-) instead of underscore (_) "cat-eating-mouse2.jpg" and "cat-eating-mouse3.jpg" that good from SEO perspective. Keep in mind what would be useful for someone who ...


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You can batch process images with an image optimizer. So if you keep the same images names and overwrite the old version of your images, then you wouldn't have to change anything in your code. For example you can use tools like jpegoptim to optimize jpeg or optipng for png images. They can be executed in batch mode decreasing each image file size ...


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This individual or this entity is going to have the ownership of the domain name since it will appear in the WHOIS. You have to trust this person because at anytime, this person may decide to seize your domain, change the nameservers and point it to another website.


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