29

CloudFlare describes Rocket Loader like this... Rocket Loader is a general-purpose asynchronous JavaScript loader coupled with a lightweight virtual browser which can safely run any JavaScript code after window.onload. Rocket Loader does a bunch of things: It ensures that all the scripts on your page will not block the content of your ...


17

The CDN should be used for all static files (.css/.js/images). Sometimes however javascript or css files can have dynamic aspect to them such as that it would include a unique user string or something of that sort. In this situation the CDN server would have to contact the origin server on every request which would defeat the purpose. If your CSS and ...


13

Sure. Obviously, it would be better to use CSS alone but if you can't, use what you have. Do as much as you can with CSS and use JS as needed. Not sure why you can't change the existing CSS but you can add a style sheet with JS. (function() { //create a new element var newStyle = document.createElement("link"); //set the required attribute for a ...


12

Nice question, here are some guides for doing that on that level. 1. CRAWL YOUR SITE When you redesign your website, there’s a good chance that URLs will change. If URLs change, you absolutely have to inform the engines where those older URLs have moved to. If you don’t, you can destroy your SEO power. All of the equity those old URLs have built up can ...


9

This is a design limitation: The file size must be between 1,000 and 10,000,000 bytes. https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonCloudFront/latest/DeveloperGuide/ServingCompressedFiles.html Compressing files is resource-intensive, so the designers of CloudFront placed an upper bound on the size of files that CloudFront will spend resources compressing on-...


8

You have no control over them because they are hosted by another provider. And honestly speaking you should not worry about them, it's up to Google, Facebook, etc to handle the caching accordingly to their need. You could potentially proxy the URLs or download the files locally, but I don't encourage you to follow that route. In fact, you may potentially ...


7

Well its not your site, its China's internet service layout, which has to jump through hoops to get even get to US DNS Servers. Furthermore, I don't know how 'free' the Internet surfing is there, meaning if it's being monitored by the government, which would undoubtedly further slow its response times. Many factors can be attributed to your site being slow ...


6

Based on your reference to the ImageMagick convert method and quality parameter, it appears you're working with JPEG images. If that's the case, the EXIF information for JPEG images does not have a standard compression level tag. However, ImageMagick appears to be able to obtain this information from the image's quantization tables using the identify ...


6

For MacOSX ImageOptim optimizes the images. Internally it uses the same tools used by google page speed. http://imageoptim.com


5

Adding the height and width attributes to your IMG SRC HTML tag allows the browser to know how much space to leave for an image. Without these values, the browser gives an image no space until the image is loaded, which means anything surrounding the image is adjusted after the image has loaded. http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch001158.htm


5

In addition to post-launch actions, I don't think you should completely ignore what's already there. You're speaking in future tense, so I presume the new site isn't ready yet; use that to your advantage and do a bit of tidying before you even make the switch. If you have pages that will have a replacement (to which you'll want a 301 redirect) then take a ...


5

Using a CDN vs traditional web hosting for delivering your static files such as CSS, JS, and images is commonly preferred. This is because once your files are cached on the CDN's edge servers, your site visitors will be delivered static content from the closest point of presence (PoP) instead of the origin server. In the majority of cases, this shortens ...


5

I don't think the modern search engines care about "older" phone compatibility. If the site is mobile-friendly in modern terms, the spiders will detect that and search engines that report it, will. I suppose you could waste your meta description and/or the opening sentence of text on the site to declare that you are backwards compatible with Nokia flip ...


4

I would say try using media queries first. One method I found easier when dealing with a design that was originally only for desktop was this: Start with two separate stylesheets. One for the new responsive design, and the other for the old desktop version: <link rel="stylesheet" media="screen and (max-width: 959px)" href="css/mobile.css"> <link ...


4

Unfortunately, you most probably won't be capable of measuring the SEO performance of the page before and after on-page optimization. The reason is you can't freeze the search engines for a period of time for your keywords. Search engines continue to calculate positions during the time where robots (web crawlers) index your page page for the first time and ...


4

When I want to do SEO changes and measure the results, I change half the pages on the site. This works best if you have a site with lots of similar pages that get similar amounts of search engine traffic. To make it work: Divide your pages into two groups, randomly if possible. I generally use the content id for each page and do even and odd. Exclude ...


4

Google is attempting to append your site name to your title. Most sites put the site name at the end of titles themselves because: It is good for branding It differentiates your listing in the search results and makes users more likely to click Its better at the end of the title than at the beginning because having the site name get truncated isn't a big ...


4

Yes, if load time is lower, you will have optimised the page. Also, the font file will be cached after the first request, so you will most likely end up with only a single request for the font file. To verify, you could use your browser's built-in timeline, or use an external tool like Google PageSpeed Insights: https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/...


4

The browser requests this for performance. Say you have a paragraph of text with an image of 100x100 pixels in the top left corner. Browser builds the page, no image yet, so it builds it with just text The image now loads, and suddenly there's space needed Browser rebuilds the page, with the proper room for the image If you give width and height to the ...


3

I worked on a site that used that method, and I had problems with screen rotation on mobile devices. Since JavaScript will only detect once on page load, if the user rotates the device it won't expand to the full width the way it will with media queries. It was easier for me at the time just to switch to CSS, but perhaps a JS expert would know if there's a ...


3

This method of deploying a newer version of a prior established website to a different domain is very much flawed as you've probably come to realize now from comments and posts above, mainly relating to the issues of Page Rank effect of aged domain and index history, the duplicate content issue and the 301 redirects. I would strongly recommend your next ...


3

If the posts on the other site are already indexed in search engines, you might just consider linking back to your main site, or doing 301 redirects to it. If you duplicate the posts on your main site, you're going to have duplicate content issues, which can be managed through Canonicalization. In regards to pages versus posts, posts are better organized ...


3

My own tests on noscript using firebug's net tab don't actually load any image contained within the noscript tags unless javascript is off. Likewise, the first poster here has no such problems and points to the w3 specification saying that such tags will be treated as text when js is on. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/14719111/is-an-image-within-a-...


3

At the moment BPG looks promising, but is something I would not use on production websites (yet). Why? It requires javascript, so users without javascript have no images. Decompression and rendering of the bpg in javascript just takes too long especially on mobile devices, even when the javascript and bpg are in the browser cache. Because the bpg rendering ...


3

I do not see where internal links of this type are penalized. However, it highly advisable not to take this tactic for two very good reasons. 1] It would be rightly seen as manipulation and any future, assuming none exist today, algorithm can quickly and easily be applied. This would be a no-brainer especially since the algorithms exist and are applied for ...


3

The DNS lookup takes place well before the client has started reading the web page, so don't worry about page size. Remember that DNS is basically the process of translating a domain name to an IP address, so myexample.com --> 123.45.678.9, and this translation has to happen before the page itself can be requested from the IP address. The page could be ...


3

Use a CDN if you need a CDN. If your user is global and spread over a large area, or you have a lot of such content that you don't want to store on your own server, that is when a CDN is useful. Globally, it can speed up access to your content if the server is closer to the user. If you have many GB or Terabytes of static data and a heavy load for access to ...


3

The only part of that, where the browser would work harder, is having to parse the extra few characters for each selector. Insignificantly so because the majority of the work is done on creating a CSS Object Model, finding the elements, and applying the property values for each element. For something as small as applying font families, it's far easier to ...


3

I think you might be thinking of Bounce Rate rather than Exit Rate. Bounce Rate, which has specific industry benchmarks, is where a user lands on a page and exits the website without going to any other pages. This is not difficult for researchers to quantify, since they can gather data for any number of e-commerce websites and find the average. In my ...


3

It is kind of possible. Allow me to explain: It is possible to attempt to measure visitor bandwidth using Javascript, but the results won't be reliably accurate. Additionally, this would also make the site load slower, which would further compound the speed issue. In this scenario, you would create a custom event in GA to fire off the JS function and report ...


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