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Yes, you can. Either buy multi-domain certificate if it's close to the end of primary domain certificate, or buy the certificate for the secondary domain only. My host for my primary domain doesn't allow me to add any more domains to my account. What can I do ? Anyway you have somewhere redirect configured from secondary to primary. If it is just ...


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Node.js can handle certificates in multiple formats, but the most common and easiest to set up is the PEM format used by Apache, nginx, etc. It doesn't matter much what you request from NetSol, as long as it is not IIS, which uses a completely different format. The only real hangup you may run into is with the intermediate CA certificates, which NetSol has ...


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You do not need a SSL certificate in order to send a secure email, the same way desktop computers, tablets and mobiles phones don't need one either. This could be happening because your server doesn't have OpenSSL installed, or your script is at fault. You can check if you have OpenSSL installed by doing: openssl version. If you need to install OpenSSL ...


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You can check if your SSL is patched against the OpenSSL CCS vulnerability (CVE-2014-0224): sudo apt-get changelog openssl | grep CVE-2014-0224 If no results are displayed then your server requires updating! do the following: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install openssl libssl-dev sudo openssl version -a If you do get changelog results or both the ...


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If you have purchase a standard, single domain SSL certificate, then it will be for one domain, so you can only use it for domainname.com or www.domainname.com. If you have purchased a wildcard or UCC certificate then it will allow either unlimited subdomains (in the case of a wildcard) or mulitple domains up to a certain number (in the case of ...


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GoDaddy does not support installing self-signed SSL certificates in shared web hosting accounts, as can be confirmed from this thread: Does shared hosting support installing self-signed certificates?. GoDaddy's shared web hosting accounts use a custom control panel (not cPanel, Plesk, etc...) that doesn't provide the option to install SSL certificates. ...


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I think that your question may derive from a bit of a misunderstanding of what the HTTP_ACCEPT Apache server variable is... (?) is there A HTTPS version of HTTP_ACCEPT image/webp? No. It's the same variable; it's the same header. The HTTP_ACCEPT Apache server variable contains the value of the Accept HTTP request header as sent from the browser. This ...


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Actually your website has a problem of using insecure SSL ciphers. You should configure the ciphers in your web server like this: ssl_prefer_server_ciphers On; ssl_protocols SSLv3 TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2; ssl_ciphers ECDH+AESGCM:DH+AESGCM:ECDH+AES256:DH+AES256:ECDH+AES128:DH+AES:ECDH+3DES:DH+3DES:RSA+AESGCM:RSA+AES:RSA+3DES:!aNULL:!MD5:!DSS; Credit for the ...


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New answer following your comment and reading again your post: I see that you created first a private key which you used to generated a self-signed certificate. You used the keyword -new which thing means that during this generation process, there is also a CSR which is created. You asked about which files to store where. In reality you need to set: ...


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I suspect you have not informed your CMS of the URL change, since most content management systems use PHP redirects from a set base URL normally set in the database or a config file. Login to your dashboard and check your settings within and perhaps the config file that is used to connect to the database.


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You have multiple questions in one. Let's Encrypt Rate Limiting For the rate limiting part it just means that you already asked Let's Encrypt too often for the same thing. When you say "When I tried to add SSL to the hosting domain" what did you do exactly? As the error message says, you can not have more than 20 certificates to be issued per registered ...


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I believe that means they will have to give you a private key for your server and the public certificate files if you aren't generating the CSR. If that is the case you would not need to generate a CSR. However you would also need to install the private key. This doesn't sound like the typical approach as the private key would have to be transferred to you. ...


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In general Let's Encrypt will often require some level of support from a shared hosting provider, and we hope to talk to many of the hosting providers to make sure that they take whatever steps are necessary to achieve that support. There may be some configurations in which hosting providers already allow users to deploy certs without the providers'...


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You don't want to put your configuration into 000-default.conf. That file is overwritten when Apache is upgraded. Instead you should put your configuration into /etc/apache2/sites-available/prollagen.conf. Put the default conf file back to how it was. You will need two virtual host directives. One for HTTPS and one for HTTP. I assume that you want ...


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Generally no they are not and they are not recommended either to be used in general. The reason is that they can't be validated or reasonably confirmed to be valid. There is no certificate authority that can vouch for it, such as Verisign, GeoTrust, or even GoDaddy itself. The trust attributed to a certificate is mainly who has vouched for it and how it was ...


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It doesn't matter where the CSR is generated as long as its generated in a compatible format, i.e OpenSSL, IIS, Microsoft Exchange and Keytool. It's extremely common for people to use different devices to create their SSL CERT. You can even use 3rd party online websites to generate the SSL cert, meaning you don't need to run anything from the commandline. ...


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There's two reasons for the Chrome browser showing the yellow warning icon associated with your security status: Certificate strength (and algorithm used); Mixed content warnings - serving HTTP over HTTPS A good test to check #1 is the Qualys SSL Test. Chrome developer tools will show if there's any insecure content for #2. When I checked the URL you ...


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It's a common mistake to think that when you create your own SSL certificate they are self-signed. You can also create your own CA, and sign your certificates with it (yeah, the CA certificate will be self signed too, but so are the "real" CA certificates - every certificate chain is started by the CA certificate, and CA is created from scratch). The main ...


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It's important to understand that SSL certificates come in two "flavors": Self-signed - In which case, you generate them entirely on your own with no additional cost. CA-signed - In which case, a recognized certificate authority (Symantec, GeoTrust, GoDaddy, etc) signs the cert. Is this a public facing website? If so, then I'd strongly suggest ...


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