11

Short Answer: Use both! Long Answer: The OG stands for Open Graph which is apart of the Open Graph protocol of which works on platforms such as Facebook. The meta description element is for search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing. Since these are two separate tags that kinda do the same thing but they are designed for different types of platforms, ...


10

There appear to be 2 key considerations which need to be taken care of before the image will display for the [summary_large_image] twitter card: 1) The image dimensions must conform (at least) to the minimum width (280px) and the minimum height (150px). Any narrower or shorter and the image will not display. 2) A page cannot (it seems) reference an image ...


8

No, you do not need an alt attribute on that meta tag. In fact, it is not even allowed as others have already said. However, (today) Open Graph specifies and even suggests to provide the image alt text via an og:image:alt property. See http://ogp.me/#structured. Note that the og:image meta tag is not an image tag, but rather a hint on which image should be ...


7

Meta Description = Search Engines, OG Descriptions = Social Platforms Meta Description is used by Search Engines Bots, while the OG (The Open Graph protocol) is used by Social Media Bots, therefore if you want 'extra' information on Social Media sites then you should opt to use both the META and OG tags. You can find a list of whom uses OG below. Source ...


6

As I understand it, if your site is 100% SSL (and everything redirects to HTTPS, so there is essentially no plain HTTP) then you only need the og:image tag in which you specify the https://... URL. Although, must admit, this is not particularly clear from the OGP documentation (or Facebook Docs) - which seems to imply (by example) that the og:image URL is ...


5

No. Google does not use OpenGraph tags. It is proprietary to Facebook. Additionally, they are functionally no different then the description and keyword meta tags which Google has stated is not used in their algorithm.


5

In my case my image path had an extra forward slash, which worked fine in-browser, but wasn't picked up by Twitter. It was a one character error that was hard to spot. E.g. check for this: https://example.com//myphoto.jpg And change it to this: https://example.com/myphoto.jpg


5

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: The Open Graph tags are used to display a preview of the content on social-media sites. The better the preview of the linked content represents the actual content, the more likely it it is for users to click the link, an read the whole article on your website. (At least that's what we want). Therefore you'll want to have a ...


4

In most cases this can simply be Twitter's card cache. It is very slow to update, up to a week. To force refresh it, see here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/58842765/2873507 Go to https://cards-dev.twitter.com/validator Type in the URL you want to update, BUT with a change. For example, add ?utm_source=Whatever Then just reloaded page with whatever ...


4

No, a meta element cannot have an alt attribute in any HTML specification. Technically, you could have the attribute title="Facebook image", since the title attribute is allowed for all elements according to HTML5 LC (though not HTML 4.01), but it is very unlikely that any browser or search engine cares about it for meta; so it would matter as comment-like ...


4

It seems counterintuitive to me, but if we take IMDB as an example of proper implementation, we can see that they use the same value for the og:title and <title> tags. To see for yourself, view source on an example movie like this one: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1049413/ then use Ctrl+f and you will see the following: og:title - "Up (2009) - IMDb" ...


3

Introduction According to my comment from question I finally found some time to deal with this problem myself. After reading many articles, and auditing many other site's code I ve partial answer. Most of them are theoretically deduced from given sources. I will update this answer after full implementation of social content on my site which will happen in ...


3

Its open protocol so many other social media sites do use like Pinterest, Google Plus do use them check here https://developers.google.com/+/web/snippet/. It will add up your SMO which in turn will help your search results too.


3

No, there is no such implementation. Open Graph metadata comes from specifically formatted links on a web page, and not from the PDF document itself (or a link to download it). You must create a dedicated page for the PDF to be downloaded from, and put the Open Graph metadata on that page. Facebook's reference documentation page is here, and as you can see ...


3

After: isolating error triggers assessing what all the error triggers had in common (they all referred to external .svg files) The answer is: Google Structured Data Testing Tool doesn't yet know how to process (or just ignore) references to SVG files.


3

These are all Open Graph protocol tags. The OG protocol is a metadata standard introduced by Facebook, and understood by many other online platforms like Twitter. While they won't help you with standard search engine indexing and ranking, your website will definitely benefit from them, because they tell Facebook and others how to interpret and display your ...


2

Open Graph markup is completely different from Schema.org markup usually displayed in individual meta tags in the site's header, like so: <meta property="og:type" content="website" /> Schema.org markup is used inline with the content and is used to mark up, or describe the content itself. Open Graph and Schema.org are two different things and have ...


2

Unfortunately there are varying standards for this, and there isn't really a 'subpage' tag. I normally default to article because it seems the most appropriate. Facebook also agrees with this, as you mentioned. For specific pages within a website, the article object type should be used. I've never had any issues with this regarding indexing or SEO and ...


2

It's not exactly what you've wanted but you can try that way. You can put a meta code for facebook image, your logo for example. put this in your code and every time you will have your logo as an option. <meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/logo.jpg"/>


2

Short answer: No they do not. Yes you should have both. Order does not matter. Twitter only detects the twitter card tags, and facebook only detects OG data. Defining slightly different images, for twitter and facebook image guidelines is a good practice, though we just provide the same image to facebook and twitter. Twitter just crops it however it wants....


2

Here Google pick your title in this order. Google prefer this first <title> Google Strongly use this Webpage Title </title>. Google can also use your H1 tag, DMOZ directory, and Anchor text(if title tag is absent). And Google don't use Open Graph Protocol in serp result. Open meta graph tags, help when you share your post in social media, so ...


2

In case this is useful for anyone else, my issue was using a relative path instead of a full URL. For example /images/example.png I had to change it to https://example.com/images/example.png.


2

No it is not bad. There are lot's of articles where marketing guys tells about the meta description and SEO, but in reality Google does not use them most of the time. They use them just for snippet, and it is neglect most of the time, when user query is not matched with your any of meta description. All of the top rated websites like support.google.com ...


2

I inspected your page That image is an html img tag that points at an https url that stores your image. <img class="scaledImageFitWidth img" src="https://external-mxp1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=AQARAAMY4iCsZ3kW&amp;w=476&amp;h=249&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fstargazerrock.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F11%2Fstar-gazers-on-fence.jpg&...


2

There can be upto six og:image tags. Refer to the Article Pins So when you add image for Facebook, you would like to specify as following og:image along with og:image:width (1200) and og:image:height (630) Similarly, for Pinterest, specify another instance of og:image along with og:image:width and og:image:height. The crawlers of Facebook and Pinterest ...


2

You can force Facebook to re-fetch the meta data of a given URL by entering it in this tool and selecting the option Fetch new scrape information. This is useful when you change (or add) open graph tags and you want the results to be immediately detected. The tool will display the metadata it found on the input URL and will update accordingly its ...


2

I can't imagine any case where this could result in legal action. The worst I could imagine is a court ordered cease-and-desist if they already asked you to remove it and you did not. There is no clear license agreement associated with Open Graph and content syndication. I would tend to agree with your opinion that it was intended to be shared on other ...


2

OpenGraph/Twitter meta tags should be used on any page that anybody is likely to send to someone else on social media or in chat apps. This is the tags' purpose - they make the link appear nicer on social media sites and chat apps. In practice, this means that all your public-facing pages should have these tags if possible. Pages behind logins No, if ...


2

The best way is to use Local Business schema, we’re really talking about types and properties within the schema.org vocabulary that are used to categorize and define information about businesses. https://developers.google.com/search/docs/data-types/local-business


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