13

You have nothing to worry about. You can use display: none; to switch menus. Search engines are much better at understanding JS and CSS. As long as you are not intentionally trying to manipulate things to get a better ranking. Using display: none; to hide big blocks of text will get you penalized. So if you are only using to hide your desktop menu on ...


10

Google expects differences between mobile and desktop sites. Even major differences, including differences in link structure, are not a problem. Google crawls the web with different Googlebot user agents for mobile. As long as your server shows that version of Googlebot the same thing that your actual mobile users see, you don't have any penalty risk. ...


8

Having a duplicate set of navigation links isn't going to change how Google sees your site much. In fact, when Googlebot encounters a second link to the same destination in a page, it generally ignores it: PageRank is only passed to the first link Anchor text only counts for the first link Having duplicate navigation is very common. I've worked with ...


5

AFAIK, not really a noticable difference. I prefer relative (always from document root, but no domain). If you'd change to https, you don't need to update every internal link in my website. If you rename your site, or change from 'always www.' to 'never www.' (for whatever reason) you don't need to update everything. This pro increases when you created ...


5

What you're describing are absolute links (https://example.com/page1.htm) and relative links (/page1.htm). It really doesn't make any difference for SEO or analytics. The advantages/disadvantages of each approach are only significant when you move a website to a different location.


4

From an SEO point of view, the only thing that matters is that the URL is correctly pointing to a resolvable document. The reason for this is that all URL's, absolute or relative, are resolved as an absolute URL. Absolute URL's are inflexible as they don't adapt to their context. Though if they're generated on the fly from a system then that's not a big ...


4

I do have an idea that may very well satisfy the people you work for, but I still recommend your idea of having navigation stand out, but since your bosses come with not-so-wonderful requests, I'll continue. What you may try to do is blend in the links with the text. For example, on your home page, you can make a paragraph about shoes and have the title ...


3

There is no reason to assume that Google Search would punish a page if the page’s navigation is not using ul. Using ul for navigation is good for various reasons, but the ranking in search engines is most likely not one of them. That Google Search is showing "LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet" in your result snippet is maybe because you are not using block-level ...


3

Every link that points to the same domain as the one that it's on is considered an internal link. Being linked from within the menu links on every page is likely to be considered more important than being linked from a single piece of content. Just imagine you were Google trying to decide which page is more important: One that is linked to from every ...


2

Search engines recommend your URL's to be no more than 67 characters in length, so you wouldn't want to get carried away with a large tree of categories. Sitemaps provide a weighting to the search engines with regard to the importance/priority you place on a page. Typically the further down the tree, the lower the priority. If all your website's pages were ...


2

You can't control it per sé, but you can hint at it. If you are using HTML5 you can take advantage of the new tags and their semantic meaning. You can use <aside> for the sidebar information and <article> or <main> for the main content. If you are not using HTML5 Google is aware of common semantic use of class names to identify parts of a ...


2

Your first question is about Sitelinks. Google says that this process is entirely automated and see this question for more information about Sitelinks. Second one is about Data Highlighter - Local Businesses You can use Data Highlighter to tag data about your business, such as its name, address, customer reviews, and ratings. Then Google can present ...


2

Most mobile menu's are "opened" via a button click, essentially opening in a modal window of some sort or another. When it comes to a website meeting accessibility standards - those menu's need to be placed in the DOM in a deliberate fashion. It isn't enough to simply use one NAV in the header and apply different CSS to achieve the desired layout (in most ...


2

You can use display: flex and then specify an alternative order: n value for divisions that moves your menu division above or below other divisions. In other words, you don't need two menus with the same content if you always hide one or other of them. A guide to FlexBox W3C Flexible Box Layout


2

It's absolutely fine to use trademarked terms on your website providing you cannot be perceived as passing yourself off as that company... Simply linking to websites using the brand name as the anchor is certainly no cause for concern.


2

Where to begin? I will stick with Google because, Who knows what Bing is doing? Your question is actually a rather broad one that requires a bit of understanding. So once again, I will get into a mini-tutorial so that you better understand what you are asking and the answer. When people think of SEO, they think in terms of one page top-to-bottom and in a ...


2

Question put to John Mueller: A: Just link naturally. The placement of a link within a page doesn't make it "safe" or "unsafe".


2

H1 should be the same as the article's title, so it has no sense that H1 becomes a link. H2 could be marked up as link, but as an anchor, like <h2><a name="h2anchor">text</a></h2> Then, if you want to make a link / an internal jump to your H2, you link to it with <a href="#h2anchor">jump to H2</a> or, in full, absolute ...


2

Right now, definitely myth. We know that Google reads CSS and JavaScript to "see" a page as a user does. Previously, almost certainly myth. As far as I know, having navigation above content has always been conventional in web design. To design a search engine that doesn't take account of this and even treats it as a negative would seem odd.


2

Okay. This gets a bit complicated. While no-one short of a search engineer can tell you what any search engine will do specifically, we know a few things based upon what Google tells us in a whole host of places. I will explain. Google will parse the HTML DOM objects from top to bottom assigning each HTML element with an ID that will uniquely identify the ...


2

There will be no negative impact on this from the SEO vantage point. Maintaining a navigation tree is more of an UX thing than an SEO thing. As long as both the pages are crawlable by spiders, you should be fine. If you still want to indicate a relation between the links, then create a tree on your HTML sitemap.


2

I wouldn't be surprised if Google is already able to cope with this navigation "pattern", as it is reasonably common and Google is "good" at processing JavaScript these days. However, this could be made more accessible (for both users and search engine bots) if you ensure that these form elements are indeed contained within a form, with a specific action ...


2

The ID scrolling attribute using # links is very useful and you're right, it's probably underutilized. There are some things to consider however. If you're using the ID attribute for this purpose, then you'd want to include navigational # links on the page. And adding all of these links can cause for clutter. Wikipedia has them in their contents div, similar ...


2

It is impossible to tell why this is less popular but we can make a few guesses: Dynamically loaded content doesn't work with fragments because the content is not there and a fragment does not cause the browser to perform another HTTP request (in Chrome we just set the position of the scrollbar). The HTML is not less tidy by adding the IDs but the page ...


2

Faceted navigation is meant to have multiple facets applied at the same time. Most eCommerce sites won't let you select several categories at once. Facets are often built from the product specifications. Categories are usually assigned. For example with photography, your categories might be by subject matter. Then your facets might be: Frame Framed ...


2

Where I have come a little stuck, is in establishing the difference between a Facet and a Child Category; primarily when it comes to SEO. Stephen Ostermiller's answer to your previous question already addresses most of this, so I won't repeat it. To expand on the SEO aspect, though, the primary issue with facets is needing to manage how they're crawled ...


2

The placement of the nav bar has no effect on SEO. According to John Mueller, Google's Senior Webmaster Trends Analyst, the positioning of internal links on a website do not impact the site's SEO: Position on a page for internal links is pretty much irrelevant from our point of view. We crawl, we use these mostly for crawling within a website, for ...


1

you should be able to differentiate two things: menu (which is mostly for users, to route them through your site structure), and real site structure (which is only for search engines / crawlers, so they have as few as possible troubles on the way to each content piece) Going from this, your real site structure should be (in the best case) start page ...


1

Firstly you should answer the question: which kinds of pages should rank? categories, sub-categories, product detail pages? Then change all unnecessary links (links from important to not important pages and links from not important to not important pages) from a href (GET) to button (POST) Then set all unnecessary pages to noindex On this way you minimize ...


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