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9

Moving my answer from Stack Overflow where your question was off-topic This is a very unusual suggestion - I've never once seen any of the SEO experts even hint at something like this. It sounds like something that used to work years ago - a bit like keyword stuffing - and could be considered to be a "black hat" these days. It certainly doesn't ...


8

Having a duplicate set of navigation links isn't going to change how Google sees your site much. In fact, when Googlebot encounters a second link to the same destination in a page, it generally ignores it: PageRank is only passed to the first link Anchor text only counts for the first link Having duplicate navigation is very common. I've worked with ...


6

In SEO perspective wrapping contents with <div> tags is not an issue but large amount unwanted coding will increase the bytes of data which may increase the PageSpeed. Here an extract from this source: Compacting HTML code, including any inline JavaScript and CSS contained in it, can save many bytes of data and speed up downloading, parsing, and ...


5

Firefox's readerview Microsoft's Read later thing Chrome's Readability Evernote's Clearly Safari's Reading List All of these have one thing in common.. they need text and they need properly formed HTML code behind them. Having these two things in your website will not only make them work with these new features but will also give you the benefit of ...


5

The website http://schema.org/ is the relevant and the only canonical source for Schema.org types and properties. Type vs. property. A type represents a thing, a property is for providing information about that thing. The name of a type always starts with an uppercase letter (e.g., Person), the name of a property always starts with a lowercase letter (e.g., ...


4

They're using microformats, specifically hCard and hCalendar. Along with RDFa and JSON-LD, this is an alternative to microdata. See Google's Rich Snippet spec for people here, and here's my public LinkedIn page viewed with Google's structured data testing tool, showing a preview Rich Snippet and the extracted structured data.


4

The impact of those styling tags (itself) is very big near nothing. Ok, why is this exactly not what it seems to be? Several sources are talking about the impact of CSS styling, the impact of responsiveness (See links at question), and the impact of semanticity and saying usually completely different things. (Not least because they are created at different ...


3

I know this is three years old, but I came across it looking for the same answer today, for Office 2010 anyway there is an option to save as "filtered HTML" without the extra Microsoft code : About using filtered HTML When you save Web pages or send e-mail messages in HTML format with Microsoft Word, additional tags are added so that you can continue ...


3

Multiple nested div's will not affect SEO. As long as the crawlers can navigate your website and encounter unique and valuable content you should be fine.


3

First of all, about the Schema.org terms you use: Your example uses the Apartments type, but that is not a valid type. You probably mean Apartment. But this type can’t have the openingHours property nor the contactPoint property. And neither can the PostalAddress have these properties, nor geo. As it typically doesn’t make sense for an Apartment to have ...


3

When in doubt, always follow the WHATWG web standards and you will always be correct. Search engines can change. Web standards change rarely or slowly and search engines look to web standards just like their browsers do (which they also author). <h3> is a heading for a section in your document. So is that phrase a heading? If not, then <strong> ...


3

I don't see any reason that breaking the titles like this could boost SEO in any measurable way. The general rule of thumb for SEO is that if it makes no sense to have your page set up some way and it goes against web standards, it's probably bad not just for SEO but for your site at large (you've already discovered that it's bad for accessibility). Good SEO ...


2

The instructions for the Good Relations on-line snippet generator tool only states to update the XHTML/HTML page header, and their Quickstart guide states for each example to: Insert the additional HTML markup given below anywhere in the body section... I do not see instructions to "post it before the closing <body> tag of your webpages." Also, ...


2

As bybe mentioned, it can take a few weeks before your structured data begins to appear, and there have been some bugs in the reporting system lately. However, I should mention that if you use Google's Data Highlighter Tool to mark up your page, Google's testing tool will not pick it up. That's because the Highlighter Tool does not actually add HTML markup ...


2

Sadly with anything Google there is nothing that is given in approx. time frames. This is because Google allocates resources to your site based on its authority and how busy their bot is. But in experience structured data normally appears between 1-6 weeks after the first index - it can take a few crawls before Google decides to display it within Google ...


2

For HTML5, name attribute is now deprecated, so that means to use id in place of name. Otherwise, everything else is the same. <a> is NOT deprecated.


2

I dont think anyone can give you specific advice on why respnsive design is so hard to code, but there are usually two approaches. A. you design for the smallest possible screen and work your way up (mobile first), or b you start with the largest possible screen and work your way down. You can get very elaborate with things, and its a matter of user ...


2

div elements mean nothing. Consumers interested in the meaning of your content simply ignore them (that is, after extracting possible attribute values, like those used by RDFa, Microdata or Microformats). For these consumers, it wouldn’t matter if a div is a parent or a child of another element (so do whatever you like more). However, if it’s possible for ...


2

Misspelled words should be enclosed with the HTML <i> Element. As there is no sic tag equivalent in HTML, in HTML 5 the <i> element has a new meaning replacing the previous non-semantic italic presentational meaning. According to the HTML5 specification of W3: The i element represents a span of text in an alternate voice or mood, or ...


2

In HTML5, the strong element can be used for "strong importance, seriousness, or urgency". I think none of these three cases matches your example, so you should not use the strong element. While "importance" may sound relevant, the definition makes clear that it’s for distinguishing the important part from other parts, but that doesn’t seem to be the case ...


2

Where to begin? I will stick with Google because, Who knows what Bing is doing? Your question is actually a rather broad one that requires a bit of understanding. So once again, I will get into a mini-tutorial so that you better understand what you are asking and the answer. When people think of SEO, they think in terms of one page top-to-bottom and in a ...


2

Check source code for Firefox: https://searchfox.org/mozilla-release/source/toolkit/components/reader/Readability.js * grabArticle - Using a variety of metrics (content score, classname, element types), find the content that is * most likely to be the stuff a user wants to read. Then return it wrapped up in a div. You can find lots of comment like:...


2

There seems to be no official documentation about this, see https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1067528. However, I'd advise trying wrapping your article in <article> tag.


2

You need at least one <p> tag around the text, you want to see in Reader View and at least 516 characters in 7 words inside the text.


2

Another problem with a code-heavy site is it takes the search engine spiders longer to crawl your pages. Even if bloated code does not affect page load time (from the visitor's perspective) the longer crawl time can negatively affect how the search engines rate your site. (It's not a major signal but every little bit helps.) From SearchEngineGuide.com: ...


2

For an article about the concept of "success", you could use something like this, using only Schema.org: <article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <div itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Intangible"> <meta itemprop="name" content="Success" /> </div> </article> To allow consumers to ...


2

The wikitext {{{1}}} renders as <blockquote>{{#tag:nowiki|{{{2}}}}}</blockquote> should do the job ({{#tag}} turns XML-style tags into normal parserfuncions, ie. flips the evaluation order).


2

In one word the answer would be NO. But adding keyword in header helps user to understand about the topic/page. For helping in SEO you must follow Google's guidelines. As @FluffyKiten said: It certainly doesn't meet Google's (admittedly vague) guidelines


2

NO. This misses the point of SEO. By breaking up linguistic data across multiple "environments", the information is artificially "out of context" for Google's algorithms and presents difficulties for interpretation and categorization. In the "big picture" Google wants your content to be useful for people, so context is important....


2

This seems to be actively being worked out at the moment, I see two GH issues that are related: https://github.com/schemaorg/schemaorg/issues/2811 and https://github.com/schemaorg/schemaorg/issues/2587 The example from the gDoc in the first issue is similar to your approach, though if anything more verbose, not less. "hasMeasurement": [{ ...


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