5

The rel="me" attribute for links is not give more PageRank (or link juice) to your linked webpage. It just means the link refers to your website attached to your profile.


3

That is really tricky. Because a 404 status code would be returned before the 404 page is produced. A 404 says a link is no longer available or temporarily unavailable. A 301 tells it the page you are looking has moved here, which it has not. A 301 redirect forces a user elsewhere, possibly not relevant and you will most likely have higher drop off rates, ...


3

rel="me" links are treated the same as any other links, with the added functionality that they tell Google that the two linking pages represent the same person. Ideally they should be reciprocal links, so you should have one on your website linking back to your profile on http://www.squidoo.com/. Something like this: John Sanjay has also written <a ...


2

Not directly. But it can have an effect, even a large effect. Basically, how you link through your website affects not only Google's ability to spider, but how it sees the hierarchy of your website. Linking prominently to an article that has high "shareability" will improve it's overall position in the search results. This means more people see it. The more ...


2

From an SEO and sales conversion point of view id suggest eliminating 404's with 301s Using the example provided by the above answer, if you want shoes and reach a 404 they'll likely click back and hit a different google page equaling lost potential* sale. However if you're redirecting them to other products and banner the page with "we didn't have what ...


1

My answer is 'yes'. It is OK. I've done it myself. You may even find Google still has the old 404 as a search entry in its database. I've known Google resurrect entries I thought were long gone - 'ancient' in web-land. If the old SERPs entries pop out when you replace them with a 301, then you may find you have both the old URL and the new in the SERPs for ...


1

The way that you are loading your image is one of the best ways to get an image ranked in Google image search. See this answer of mine. So even if you are using some PageRank, it is hardly being wasted, it is being used to rank the image well in Google image search. However, it is impossible to waste link juice within your own site. About 10 years ago,...


1

URLs with hashes are generally ignored by majority of Search Engines as it contains a block of information which can be found in the same page. This is not related to the crawl budget or link juice, as the URL is treated as one single landing page. In majority of cases, links with "#" are given less importance. The best way to pass value to whatever ...


1

There is no particular or accurate way of controlling your link juice to URLs as Google does not disclose any information as such. However, giving "nofollow" to the URLs will stop from passing more link juice to those internal/external pages which are not important for you. Notes: Even though people recommend to do "nofollow" to stop the link juice ...


1

I think this is subjective; I don't see how we can possibly know for sure whether a single link has benefited the target site in Google's algorithm. On the face of it, so called "link juice" is passed to the target site (not necessarily the value of the HREF attribute if there are additional redirects involved). However, in this example, the anchor is ...


1

Link juice degrades with how far away the link is from the homepage and other important pages on the site. If a homepage links to another site it passes partial juice. If a homepage links to an internal page that links to a site the juice is degraded between the homepage to the internal page, and then degraded again from the internal page to the site. It ...


1

The best approach from an SEO perspective is 1 page -> 1 link. Nonetheless the best solution would be a 301 redirect one to one (without the middle page/link) and showing in the final page a small content-popup (similar to cookie consent notice) informing about the changes.


1

Although John Muller has confirmed that no PageRank(RIP) is lost, Moz has claimed that there is some studies that confirmed the contrary. Either way, in my opinion, it is safer to assume that some “link juice” is lost. The delay won’t really matters because clients wait for the server response and then fetch response content. 301 will be the response, In ...


1

301 redirects work per page and not per domain, so if you 301 redirect a page Google index algorithm will recognise that the new page is replacing the old one. However that doesn't mean that the new page will be indexed exactly with the same score as the old one. 301 redirects pass the score from the number/quality of links pointing to page, but this is ...


1

Googlebot does not use cookies and therefore does not use sessions. As a result, Google never sees the URLs for each town. You are on the right path creating a sitemap. However, putting URLs into a sitemap is not sufficient to get them crawled and indexed. See The Sitemap Paradox. You will need to find some way of linking to the town URLs from other ...


1

Based on Google's Pagerank algorithm which the published in 1998, all links are treated equally. This is also called the "Random Surfer" model where value is assigned because the hypothetical person surfing the page randomly clicks on any link. Google has tweaked this algorithm over the last 20 years. It is now clear that they have moved (at least to ...


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