14

You've really got two licenses there: The Apache License 2.0 and the MIT License. Both have restrictions that require copyright and other notices to remain intact. As indicated here for the Apache License under Licensing conditions: in every licensed file, any original copyright, patent, trademark, and attribution notices in redistributed code must be ...


10

No, unless you do a search with the correct license. When you do an image search, there is an option to select the license. Go to Images. Enter a search term. You should see a Tools button toward the left side. Click on it. It becomes gray and a set of dropdowns appear toward the right side. Click on Usage Rights and select your expected usage. "Labeled ...


5

Definitely not. There are a number of websites that do offer free images that can be used for commercial purposes. CC Search will allow you to search a number of online venues for suitable images https://search.creativecommons.org/


4

Although a nonprofit organization is a legal entity with certain tax exemptions and possible charitable status, that classification doesn't necessarily mean all reuse would be considered noncommercial. As indicated in the FAQ for the Creative Commons: If you are a nonprofit or charitable organization, your use of an NC-licensed work could still run ...


3

I can't imagine any case where this could result in legal action. The worst I could imagine is a court ordered cease-and-desist if they already asked you to remove it and you did not. There is no clear license agreement associated with Open Graph and content syndication. I would tend to agree with your opinion that it was intended to be shared on other ...


3

My first question is is my filtering correct if I want to use some one's else image on my blog. Yes (although you might be able to use less strict rules depending on your specific needs, e.g. if you want to use an image unedited or if your blog is non-commercial). Secondly after I have found the image with proper license, as I understand I need to ...


3

Yes. Just check the license to make sure that it doesn't have a "Free for non-commercial use only" restriction.


3

Usually, their license information is also within the .js and .css files that you are using for your JavaScript and CSS. As an example, I use a lot of bootstrap colours from Bootswatch which are premade themes and colour sets. Here is an example of one of the license information within the bootstrap.css file: /*! * Bootswatch v3.1.1+1 * Homepage: http://...


2

On any page that uses the content licensed under the CC Attribution 2.0 Generic licence must contain the link to that license and the appropriate credit. If you use a lot of content under this license you might find it easier to put the link to the license on every page, most likely in a footer. But the attribution must be specific for each piece of content ...


2

Can I delete that CSS comment? No, it's not just a comment, it's a license and attribution notice for the original creator. Even though you modified the original code, as I covered in my answer here, under Licensing conditions, the Apache License 2.0 states: You must retain, in the Source form of any Derivative Works that You distribute, all copyright, ...


2

From a technical POV, nothing stops you from "pirating" -. If you are found to be infringing you may face legal consequence for copyright infringement. This is no conceptually no different to grabbing images of another website.


2

The direct answer to your question: There is not really a 100% foolproof method to prevent the illegal downloading of custom fonts in 100% of cases. There might be others, but some common practices that can prevent it: Only put the fonts used on the site on your server. No sense in loading the entire font family anyways Configure server to deny Hotlinking ...


1

Every Wordpress sites have an url like this one : /license.txt (but most of the time access is forbidden or redirect to the home/404) Here's an example Here's another So feel free to add a license.txt but that's not an obligation.


1

The licensing agreements with any theme companies/authors and if you are using something like Wordpress.com to host it may be different. @dan is right to review and compare those. There are some general points. A website is a group of pages for let's call it "a purpose." Websites are typically built on one domain: mydomain.com. Within that construct, you ...


1

You are not allowed to do this. AS soon as your website is out in the public you will need to use subscribe to the SPLA from Microsoft which is the Service Provider's License Agreement. Basically, you will be paying monthly for the use of SQL server, and the Windows server as well if you are also using Windows to serve up your application. Look for ...


1

If these are your own websites and you have a dedicated server, you should be able to use SQL Server Express edition which is free and can be used in production - but there is a limit to the memory and CPU it can use (and some other features), but for basic websites it should be enough. Are there features that you need in the web/standard editions?


1

There's a great site for choosing your license here: https://choosealicense.com/ If you'd like to avoid duplicate content issues, use an Apache license and include a link back to the original within it. All copies must then carry a copy of the license + link.


1

Other copies of your work can exist and you can still have great SEO. As long as you are seen as the authoritative original source, your site will still rank and the content on the other sites won't show up in search results at all. There is a chance that when somebody copies your content that Google gets the sources all wrong and indexes the other site ...


1

Many organisations that provide creative commons content make distinctions between commercial websites which are built specifically to make a profit and sites which simply have a few ads on the pages to offset hosting costs. Best bet is to ask but you will find that many won't have an issue with your site having ads on it, the issue would arise if you ...


1

One possibility is to use music licensed under the Creative Commons licenses. This music can be freely distributed as long as the various license terms (like attribution). There are several music communities that share and rate this music. Your site could be another one.


1

It looks like it was taken from a video, rather than created for a gif. Specifically, this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5uHt4AwYb4 I personally wouldn't worry about copyright issues in this case - the fact the video has been there since 2007 suggests that the owner isn't that bothered, even though he is more likely to make money from selling ...


1

This is confusing because there are 2 pieces of information here that are not intuitive. First is the license that this theme is distributed under, GLPv2. Short answers is that GPLv2 allows you to modify and distribute as you see fit. You can ready about the specifics here - http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html The second piece of information is the ...


1

Dump it, apply for a license, download their current, up-to-date package, install it and proceed from there. If you liked what you saw, then your purchased install will be legitimate. Proceeding with the current state of affairs without purchasing the template is theft and often Karmic in that when you run into problems in implementation, you have no ...


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