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As a rule, what makes sense for semantic markup and accessibility usually also makes sense for SEO, and you should certainly not damage usability or code quality for the sake of any SEO that Google have not recommended to webmasters. On-site SEO should be about helping Google index your site thoroughly and accurately, and not trying to find loopholes in ...


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The straight answer is there is no direct impact on SEO ranking when it comes to placing a set of links on top navigation vs footer links. Instead of thinking about placing set of links on left, right or footer. You should think about better site structure which will be useful for the user. A good website structure tends to rank better. The general rule ...


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Go for frontend Use a responsive framework, like twitter bootstrap or similars, create only 1 website for all. Then use media queries to switch css rules where you need if for mobile or not. And defintly switch all you want to show or not in mobile and desktop by server side. For example a huge banner on mobile is useless, switch that using html modules ...


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Summary: Go with responsive web design (what you call frontend). When you go with the "backend" version, you have the following disadvantages: You have to create two websites: one for desktop and one for mobile. Or you have to create a smart custom solution that outputs the same content to the two different websites automatically. Not easy. You have to ...


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Not really sure could we consider that as a "modification", but in my understanding it is acceptable - AdSense Help Center says adsbygoogle.js can be loaded once, and it doesn't say where. adsbygoogle.js within the HEAD tags is loaded asynchronously - the async attribute if forcing asynchronous mode. About the asynchronous ad code > FAQ https://support....


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If you carefully observe most of responsive design css, you will find % as prime unit for width,height,margin etc. For font-size, em is widely accepted. Additionally media queries is also important.


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To optimize for mobile, you need to have a viewport configured in the meta tag. This is what I use: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width,initial-scale=1"> That way I'll have pixel units match CSS units when I specify units in pixels in CSS even for mobile. The only units I use most often for maximum compatibility are: px - The raw ...


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It's not just Chrome. Grid layout isn't supported by the majority of browsers. From: http://caniuse.com/#feat=css-grid You won't be able to use this feature until it is enabled at least in Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. If you care about mobile, then Android browser as well. Most web developers wait until a feature is supported by 80% or more of their ...


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I don't see where it says that product is licensed under the GPL or that it is offered for free under any circumstances. In fact their FAQ days: DO I NEED TO BUY GENESIS? Yes. So if you use it for free you are almost certainly acquiring it through illegal means. So no, it is not safe to use for free.


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Google knows what is what before your visitors do Google's crawlers have really advanced since there first launch, their crawlers has the ability to detect actual content area, the width of that content as well as the height of the actual content region. Repeated Content Elements such as headers, footers and sidebars that get repeated on several or all ...


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Even if you do not order anything and the navigation and sidebar div(s) appear in the HTML code before the content, Google and Bing can sort this out without too much trouble, however, there is a performance boost, albeit not a huge one, when you can push these elements below the content. The primary reason is because the HTML is read in byte order from left ...


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I think it's a bug in Chrome. See https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=246875 There might be some workarounds in there for you. Also double check your markup is valid.


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Think about it this way: no matter what your screen size or device, your content is the same plus minus a few items that are may not be relevant on certain device types. This is analogous to having content on a screen and printing out that content. You can use separate style sheets for screen and print media. You don't make a separate website just for print ...


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Depends on what you mean by "complete" and "layouts", but Initializr springs to mind.


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Twitter Bootstrap uses a responsive grid layout that should have a max width for content, so it should limit the main content sections to a certain width by default. However, the growing popularity of XD (eXtreme Definition) displays that are 2560px wide or more (e.g. WQUXGA like the IBM T221 family of displays or even 4000px+ wide monitors) means that most ...


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Well, put it this way: You face many different browsers on Pcs, mobile devices, tablets, OS, so naturally, as much as you try to have a seamless look, differences will happen. If you set your main div width for example, to a percentage (50%, 70%, 100% etc.), it'll definitely look different always. With different systems and monitor resolutions, you're bound ...


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I have written a short javascript code that could help you: alert( 100 / document.body.offsetWidth * document.getElementById("<YOUR_ELEMENT_ID").offsetWidth ); You have to insert in the line above the ID of the elements that you want to know the percentual width related to the window width. You can insert this line of code in firefox url bar (preceded ...


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I would use a calculator. 100 / screenWidth * elementWidth But what should that be good for? The designer should set up the percentages once for the layout. Screen sizes are different, thus also the computed percentages would differ, depending on what screen size you are using such a ruler. 100 / 1600 * 900 = 56.25% 100 / 1024 * 900 = 87.89%


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Content before navigation (in the HTML, not necessarily in terms of the layout on the page) is more useful for accessibility than SEO. I would do it for those reasons. Those using screen readers will get the content quicker than if they have to hear every item in every drop down menu on your navigation.


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The best test is to make a website. I didn't see a url in your profile so start creating a website for yourself. Start with a design you created in a graphics application. Code the HTML, add the CSS (bonus points if you use responsive design), add some javascript to make it a bit interactive. If you also know a server-side language then add features so you ...


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I suggest you try using columns as follows with a media query to help avoid narrow screens displaying the columns if they will not work properly. It is coded for Chrome and Safari (-webkit) as well as for Firefox (-moz). You can change the column count and column gap to suit your needs. I find it to be quite reliable. @media only screen and ( min-width: ...


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