7

Actually, what you want is hidden in Visitor Flow: Go there, and find the page you want stats on where visitors went next. To do that, you need to click on that page and select "Explore traffic through here", which ultimately leads to another flow visualisation, but only includes traffic going to and from that page:


6

It is a confusing state of affairs, but here are some pointers: Don't use the canonical tag in the way you were thinking. Content translated into several languages is not duplicate content. So you don't want to be pointing /fr/ --canonical--> /en/ at all. Use rel="alternate" hreflang="en" instead. Use canonical within a given language to account for ...


4

Average Time on Page is calculated as the average difference between the request timestamp for that page and the request timestamp for the next pageview that occurred within your site. If only a single page is viewed during a visit, that pageview does not figure into Average Time on Page, since there is no second timestamp to subtract from. ...


4

"Next page path": the next page after visiting the page you have selected for analysis "Second page": the absolute second page of the visit. Second page works if the page you are currently viewing, is indeed the landing page (first page) of the visit. If you are viewing data of a page the visitor just viewed somewhere during his visit, it is not the next ...


3

Next page path is deprecated . Google Analytics tracks the page you are on, and it records the page you came from. Since it can't know where you are going next, it can't record the 'next page'. In the application, the 'next page' is actually the same as the 'page'. The 'previous page' is where they came from. They intended that you use 'next page' and '...


3

There's no official way to get Google to reevaluate a landing page. As per their own instructions on this: The Google Ads system visits and evaluates landing pages and websites on a regular basis. If you make significant changes to improve your landing page experience, you may see higher ad quality (and higher Ad Rank) over time. You might not see an ...


3

Is the new page ranked at all for "widgets london"? Don't be surprised if it's ranked much lower than the home page was before the change. Even if you did a great job optimizing it, it's still a new page and you say it's a competitive term. Did you also change your internal linking structure for this? If not, your previous style probably has many ...


2

You can setup a custom report which can do what I think you want to happen. Try the following link which is a custom report I've setup for this. https://www.google.com/analytics/web/template?uid=lZSxJ7XKTH2Z3th4RnTeJw You will need to 'edit' the report to capture the correct goal id/number as mine will be different to yours. You will then see the page ...


2

Using server-side scripting (i.e., PHP) is not the fastest way to do redirects with because first the request is received by the web server, then the PHP code is interpreted, and then the results are sent back to the client. Instead, you can do the redirect in your web server configuration, bypassing the need to run PHP. For example with Apache, you can use ...


2

The internal links does matter. read https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/138752?hl=en The number of internal links pointing to a page is a signal to search engines about the relative importance of that page. If an important page does not appear in this list, or if a less important page has a relatively large number of internal links, you ...


2

It could also count your own visits (or other developers/users) while you investigate/test the site, unless you have explicitly blocked yours/their IP from loading GA. I have seen plenty of people (especially when checking their Google indexed pages) do a Google search and click a few links to navigate around their own site. If you do that and can't find ...


2

Answer is simple. User had started with google (new session) then left your website and came back directly (or other non-tagged source) to non-indexed page. Session (from google / organic) was continued and user landed on non-indexed page, but GA still counts that as organic traffic. Direct traffic, however, never updates or replaces an existing campaign ...


2

Redirecting pages to the most-relevant pages is best, but make sure you don't end up with a large chain of redirects. This means, don't make it where when a user acceses one page, they are redirected to another URL which in turn redirects to another URL after that. That will increase overall loading time for the user by at least 300 milliseconds per redirect ...


2

Redirecting pages to the homepage is the last resort as it can lower the SEO value of your homepage which is what you don't want to happen. You need to try and redirect to the next best page. Think about if you are a user and get to the original page then are redirected to the homepage and think "what happened? Why am I here and why didn't I get the page I ...


2

I had faced the same situation with few of my clients & make a lot analysis upon it. Firstly you should need the answer about why it happened. Your Adwords campaign is configured for your TG (Including, Demographic, Age, Keywords, Interest etc) So you get the more leads from your campaign because the users landed upon it's already intent about to take ...


2

Google's documentation clearly states For language/country selectors or auto-redirecting homepages, you should add an annotation for the hreflang value "x-default" So in this case your x-default should be www.example.com and not www.example.com/en/. To simplify the answer, your use case does not seem to indicate any need for rel=canonical at all. You ...


2

Make sure the page is issuing a 302 header code. This indicates a temporary redirect and shouldn't adversely impact rankings if it's temporary. An alternative is a 503 maintenance code which does not impact Google ranks if it's temporary. Keep in mind that Google will legitimately assume the content being searched for can't be found and begin demoting if it ...


2

Per Google's definition, this could be considered cloaking. It really depends on how much the content varies and if it's consistent otherwise. There's bound to be some give but Google is the only one who can tell you if you've crossed it. Check Search Console for any Manual Actions.


2

Sounds bad UX, build a site that is easy to use and has rich content. For example, consider a one-page site and have relevant links to your services contact info about sections all on one page.


2

In your situation I would definitely redirect (301 permanent redirect) the "bad landing pages" to the best corresponding page you wish to keep. Why? As you say, there might be backlinks to some of the pages which you don't want to risk loosing. At the same time, there could also be bad backlinks and spammy backlinks pointing towards the bad landing pages. If ...


2

Summary: NO. Since your website is new and has minimal value in eyes of Search Engines, targeting keywords with appropriate landing pages is better for SEO. Instead, you can add an internal link with the target keyword to your landing page. Explanatory notes: You only need redirections when your old page has an value attached to it and the redirection is ...


2

I'm going to give you a few things to try in hopes that one of them will work for you because depending on circumstances you may or may not be willing or able to use them: If this is a keyword important enough to merit special attention (it sounds like it is) then make sure you split it out into its own campaign(s). Getting the keyword into the ads 1.) I'...


1

If i understand you correctly you can do an A/B test first before completely changing your index.html page since the site have a descent amount of traffic you can easily gather data on your A/B test. A/B testing (also known as split testing or bucket testing) is a method of comparing two versions of a webpage or app against each other to determine ...


1

3- you can use server-side url rewriting to rewrite all /index.html requests to /new-index.html . what will happen "overview" ? everything will go well without any client-side redirect . what will happen "technically" ? when a client hit the server and requests index.html, the server will "internally" deal with that url index.html as if it were new-...


1

Of course you can create a single landing page for all languages … <!DOCTYPE html> <head> <title>Example.com</title> </head> <body> <article lang="en"> <h1><!-- English site title --></h1> <p>…</p> <a href="/en/" hreflang="en">Visit the English site</a> &...


1

When I hear the term landing pages I get worried. Often, these are too closely related content wise. If however, they are unique content pages, then I would breath a bit better. Here is why. Google has gotten smarter about landing pages recently. It is possible, that some pages will be too closely related even if they are tuned for specific keywords. If ...


1

301 redirect is not an option in this situation. That's the first thing NOT to do. I think that best approach here is this second option (Rename index.html to moreInfo.html and put the landing page as index.html with a rel="canonical" to moreInfo.html(the old home page) as to preserve rankings and link equity) with this option, you are saving link ...


1

You generally cannot outrank established websites for these terms due to amount of historical backlinks and other ranking factors aside from just on-page content. You can, however, try and outrank for long-tail queries first then build authority on the topic. This is more of a long-term play and is a great strategy for taking some traffic from the big guys. ...


1

It depends. First: what are the websites you want to outrank? Second: how many backlinks your webpage receives from good sources? If the websites you want to outrank are very well known like CNN, ESPN, Yahoo etc. or even the most famous blogs in the category, there's no way you can do it now, and if you don't do inbound marketing for the future. In case ...


1

Google considers mass redirects to be "soft 404" and treats them the same as if the pages were 404 not found status when it can detect them. Google automatically assumes that any redirect to the home page is a soft 404. Your mass redirects to landing pages probably won't be identified by Google as soft 404 errors and you could probably get away with it.


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