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5

There are a couple of ways this can be done. IIS7 introduced the integrated pipeline. Many IIS6 developed applications can handle running as is in the IIS7 integrated pipeline, but for the ones that can't there are a couple of options for what can be done. The easiest thing to do would be to switch the app pool the site or application is running to '...


5

This won't work in an HTML page, so is it possible to configure IIS 7 to have the #include directive work in both HTML and PHP pages? Is there a better way to do this period? Something that might simplify things for you overall would be to configure IIS to use PHP code inside .html files instead of .php files. Then you'll be able to use PHP code directly in ...


4

One good and easy way to prevent execution of certain file extensions under an specific folder is to use the "Request filtering" feature of IIS to prevent accessing them altogether. Go to the folder in IIS and in the "File Name Extensions" tab of the "Request filtering" feature, add "Deny file extension" rules for the file extensions that you want to lock. ...


4

It's really very hard to suggest anything without more information, the nameserver thing is weird but not unheard of in the messy world of DNS. If I had to guess I'd say it's something local rather than your site. The most common cause I've seen for this kind of thing is the adblock plugin, cached DNS information or overactive antivirus/antimalware. I'd ...


4

IIS Server variables IIS server variables provide information about the server, the connection with the client, and the current request on the connection. IIS server variables are not the same as environment variables. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms524602(v=vs.90).aspx


4

No. I run several sites like this. The binding determines which app takes the requests, and each app can only have one app pool. An app pool can use multiple processes (a web garden) but that is completely unrelated to wildcard domain names (even a single domain gets split across multiple processes in this scenario). An app domain (a security construct ...


3

Windows Authentication will really only work if the IIS server is joined to the domain. That's the first thing you'll want to do (assuming you can). Once you do - WindowsAuthentication will make authentication a breeze. If joining the domain is out of the question, then you'll at best be able to use a mechanism based on forms authentication that could '...


3

I've been able to reset a lot of my site's values using appcmd, but I had to dig into specific configurations I wanted to change, which I'll describe a bit below. I know for sure that this works with IIS 7, but I'm not 100% certain whether it passed on to 7.5 so YMMV. appcmd isn't in my cmd path on any of my installations (though these machines are 2k8sp2) -...


3

Yes if you allowOverride and then add a new web.config file in the folder you want to disable. So in your parent folder web.config should look like this. <configuration> <location path="." allowOverride="True"> <system.webServer> <directoryBrowse enabled="True" /> </system.webServer> </location>...


3

You can block favicon.ico requests from the browsers using the rewrite module for IIS. Basically you must install the module and activate it. Then you must create a rule in your web.config of your site or use the GUI on IIS Admin for creating it. You can get more info there: http://www.iis.net/download/urlrewrite http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/467/using-...


3

At its root, this is almost certainly a database problem. The first thing to check is the indexes on the tables. If the full-text search is fast and the SELECT is slow, then there are most likely JOINS being performed that could benefit from indexes, possibly even composite indexes. You will need to profile the application (run a trace using SQL Profiler) ...


3

Sounds like either something is sharing the port or its failing to shut down correctly Run a netsh http show servicestate to diagnose if anything is running on the HTTP Service. Additionally do a netstat -ano and see if the IIS service is running on a ID. (I know you said TCPView is reporting ID:0 but this doesn't sound right and I'd put more trust in the ...


3

It is not the perceived depth of directory that google factors into rankings, urls with so called deep directories can be indexed and ranked just as shorter ones can. http://www.searchenginejournal.com/url-structure-seo/11801/ Though Google does recommend you keep urls as simple as possible. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/76329?hl=en


3

The problem you're having is solved with CORS: The Cross-Origin Resource Sharing standard works by adding new HTTP headers that allow servers to describe the set of origins that are permitted to read that information using a web browser. Additionally, for HTTP request methods that can cause side-effects on user data (in particular, for HTTP ...


3

If all you are doing is moving the files on your file system to another location but want to keep the same URL structure, rather than setting up URL Rewrite rules you can change the physical path of your IIS website configuration. I will make the following assumptions: You are running website "mydomain.edu" from a physical location such as C:\inetpub\...


3

Yes, it will. The http and https version will be seen as individual pages and thus also create duplicate content. The solution is to use a 301-permanent redirect, which your code does. This will transfer the juice to the destination of the redirection, so you're good. Also, adding a canonical tag to indicate which is the prefered url is good practice. ...


2

From https://stackoverflow.com/questions/117931 Use the following rewrite rule to forward the entire URL into your script: RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d RewriteRule ^(.*)$ index.php?q=$1 [L,QSA] Then inside your index.php script, get the 'q' parameter, and split it on slashes. Put the values into a map. $pathmap = ...


2

Web Deployment Tool / msdeploy rocks.... if you are staying within same major version of IIS. However, I have seen significant headaches going from 7.x to 8.x.


2

If this works in a similar way to Apache, then you could simply create an index.php file (or whatever your directory index file is) in the directory that you don't want to see a directory listing.


2

1) Google picked it up because it is linked from somewhere. Maybe you posted it on social networking site or had a test site which that was getting indexed by Google. In Google, search using the following to find what other links have been indexed. site:www.yourwebsite.com 2) Best way to stop search engines picking it up is by using robots.txt file. If you ...


2

Assuming that you want the uploaded files to be served as static content (or else you could just save the uploads outside the root folder of your application): Inside your root web.config (which can't be overwritten by users), use this (as suggested by Javier G., but with allowOverride=false): <location path="upload" allowOverride="false"> <...


2

I would create a google account for each server. that way I would keep track of each server usage.


2

You can take steps to optimise the DB. For example, you can have full-text index fields which increases the reponse time for SQL search queries dramatically (particularly when it includes medium - large bodies of text). Beyond that, You need to have a look at what the problem is. Without access to source code it's difficult but it seems to me that, if the ...


2

I'm not sure this is at all possible. The LOGS need to be its own virtual server. So essentially, set up a new virtual web server (if you're using Apache this is a breeze,) with it's root folder pointing to the same folder as this one does: in http://server2012/logs/. Then, set up your DNS (bind?) to aim the internal traffic from http://LOGS/ to the ...


2

It's as simple as adding each domain as a host header to your dev.domain.com site bindings. IIS won't change the HTTP_HOST as passed by the client except in certain circumstances, such as a site bound to the loopback address.


2

You'll want to make sure you have the Microsoft URL Rewrite Module installed, and create a rule template as covered step-by-step here: IIS.net - User Friendly URL - rule template The other way to do this is edit your web.config file, as covered here (substituting your URL's under "The lines to modify...").


2

GoDaddy has a help page about web application trust level. It says that with ASP 4, you should be able to enable "full trust" with this directive in your Web.Config file: <configuration> <system.web> <trust level="Full" /> </system.web> </configuration>


2

You need to create an A record for sqldb1234.db in your DNS area for GoDaddy. http://support.godaddy.com/help/article/2290/how-do-i-create-a-subdomain-in-simple-control-panel Once the A record has propagated you should be able to use the subdomain sqldb1234.db.mydomain.com in your connection string.


2

Yes. Just create a new application with the desired sub path under the main site. The new application can be run under a separate application pool. Note that there may be fixes you need to make to the second application, because it is running with a sub path. If it generates any absolute URLs or server-relative URLs, they must be generated with that in ...


2

The design pattern you are using is called the "front controller" -- a central entry point for handling requests. Here is a website that shows how to implement that pattern with various webservers. Here is the configuration they recommend for IIS in the web.config file: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration> <system.webServer> ...


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