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6

ICANN is several layers removed from your hosting. There is a link, but isn't a direct link in any sense. ICANN is an organization that oversees the domain name system. They allow other companies to operate top level domains. They run some of the DNS servers that point to the DNS servers of the top level domain operators. The top level domain operator ...


5

Domain has 30 days renewal from the date after it expired. Then redemption period activates for another 30 days. After the redemption period, you'll be able to register domain again. Redemption period means this: This status code indicates that your registrar has asked the registry to delete your domain. Your domain will be held in this status for 30 days....


5

Just wait until May 25 and then use a registrar in the EU. The new GDPR rules will prohibit making personal information publicly available with whois. See here, for example.


4

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is a non-profit organisation responsible for the root-level infrastructure, policy and governance of the Internet. Principally they: Work closely with Domain Name Registries that have chosen to enter into a contract with ICANN for governance, technical assistance and dispute resolution etc. (It ...


3

Stephen's answer gives you all the details, but I think your misconception or slight changes of wording is related to something else, the "IANA root". ICANN oversees the running of the system, and plays no operational part (which is a simplification, as they technically run some root nameservers, and are also the "registry" of .int, but this is tangential ...


3

There are domain registry services that allow for free private whois information. One of the registrars that I use doesn't charge me anything extra for private whois. One of the other registrars that I use charges me an arm and a leg for private whois. I think it's largely dependent on which registrar you go with, as their pricing breakdown is most often ...


3

ICANN requirements passed along registries, registrars and finally the registrant are that you can be contacted at the address given, in the (honestly never occuring) case someone sends you a letter there. If your address accepts mail for you that you can collect, you fulfill the requirements. See https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/faqs-f0-2012-02-25-en ...


3

What prevents a very well-funded organization from creating any unused site domain they choose (i.e. something.edu) and having it searchable/usable on the World Wide Web without going through an organization like IANA? The answer you are looking for is the Internet Domain Name System (DNS) itself. IP Addresses and Domain Names Basic DNS is a generic ...


3

I am a hosting provider and domain reseller. I spend much of my time helping people who have lost track of where their domain is registered and have no idea of the difference between domain registration and site hosting. As I say to them having everything in one place will almost certainly help you avoid tears and heartache - trust me on this. Find a ...


3

I worked for a company once who went down this road. It was manageable with a handful of domains, but at one point we held several hundred and it just got to be silly. Sure we had a spreadsheet to tell us what was where, but when it came to ongoing management like renewals (and remembering to charge end-clients for them) it led to more frustration than it ...


3

Response from ICANN. Unfortunately I can not. Thank you for contacting the ICANN Global Support Center. The application window for the current round of new gTLDs closed in 2012. At this time, we are still processing applications from this round and dates for the next round have not yet been set. You can stay informed of the latest program ...


2

When domains expire/drop they become available to 'catch' and reregister using backordering before they are released for general public to purchase. If a backorder is placed by anyone (including resellers) then the registrar which accepted the backorder get to put their name in the hat. At the time of expiry a registrar name is picked out of the hat and they ...


2

There are a number of instances where actions taken by ICANN need the support or consultation of the Registrars Stakeholder Group. Without someone from ICANN coming on here and confirming officially the reason for the duplicate records I suspect that it could be similar to a shareholder type of situation where each accredited registrar entry has one vote and ...


2

Like it has already been said, it is not required, for a webhosting company to be an ICANN registrar. It is also a different job. You can in fact be just a reseller of any ICANN registrar providing such option (and there are many of them) or just even buying the domain name at any given registrar for your clients. It technically works and create the same ...


2

No, you need to wait for the following Round to submit an application. It is unrealistic to provide a date yet but there are rumors. When it is possible, the entire domain name press will talk about it and the info will be published on the ICANN website: https://newgtlds.icann.org/en/. I suggest to subscribe to the gTLD.club Newsletter too.


2

In short, nothing forbids anyone to creating new TLDs. It happened a lot in the past, with what was called "alternate roots". Because creating TLD is not the problem, the problem is accessing them. You have either them registered in the one global root managed by ICANN (see https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/unique-authoritative-root-2012-02-25-en ) or ...


2

In short: no one knows and no one can predict anything about this. Like in some other areas, past behaviors will not give you indications of what will happen in the future. Any kind of sugar coating on this is just pure personal ramblings. The facts are that: the gTLD registries are under contracts with ICANN, with some variations, for example VeriSign ...


2

Many Registrars, including us, will give you privacy for free. There are also extensions where privacy is the default, not just an option.


1

Your question is too vague, as this depends on the TLD. In the gTLD world, the content of whois is restricted per ICANN agreements. You can find all details in Specification 4 at https://newgtlds.icann.org/sites/default/files/agreements/agreement-approved-31jul17-en.html for registries and in section "REGISTRATION DATA DIRECTORY SERVICE (WHOIS) ...


1

The issues are linked, for the reasons explained below. But let us please first go back in history to put things in context, and I will be mostly targeting gTLDs and .COM/.NET in fact: when the registry/registrar split started, the protocol used to communicate was then RRP (see RFC2832); as you can see in its section 4.3.10 the transfer command was used by ...


1

It does happen that a registry increases the price of its domains but it is rare and when it happens the increase of price is very small. I wouldn't worry too much about this. Some new domain name extensions are cheaper than ".com" by the way. What can happen, and again this is ultra rare too, is buying a premium domain name and having a renewal price that ...


1

Verisign has contracts with ICANN to handle registry of top level domains, which includes pricing and fees. Assuming these contracts don't expire and things don't change, the fees will probably remain level with modest increases. Verisign essentially formed a monopoly of domain registrations for these top level extensions in the early days of the internet ...


1

Only gTLDs are signing a contract with ICANN which clearly frames what they can and can not do. ccTLDs have a basic mutual understanding with ICANN but are not regulated by it. They are supposedly for the local community and are administratively delegated to the government, which puts in place whatever structure it likes to run things (university sector, ...


1

I registered a domain via WebHostFive back in May 2017. It worked for about 2 weeks and then in mid-May it totally disappeared. I did TraceRoutes and WhoIs lookups to find out that this no longer existed. I also contacted PublicRegistryDomain and was told that they changed to JJRCompanies. I contacted JJRCompanies and received no reply. I called the ...


1

Is your name on the Whois record or is it the Hosting companies name? That is the most important question right now Check to see if the host is a reseller for a larger company. If they are, contact that larger company, but if you aren't listed on the Whois record, the Registrar's hands may be tied. WebhostFive has their own domain registered with 1&1,...


1

Interesting... I registered my domains through my hosting company, Webhost Ion and it came back from JJR companies (Joshua Robbins). Webhost Ion has disappeared as well as JJR co. Turns out Webhost Ion was a reseller not actually providing the hosting. You are probably in the same situation. Webhost Ion is in arrears on their account so my cPanel (including ...


1

Your client, who obviously entered the wrong email address, should contact the registry directly and generally provide all sorts of ID. If you are the reseller, best thing you can do to look after your customer is contact your wholesaler as well and check what the process is. I doubt it will be easy. But I reckon you have left your run a bit late. Your ...


1

You have many questions in a single post. So in your order: 1) I want to buy a .com domain name that is [supposed to be] expired for 64 days now (according to whois.net) Never use third party whois servers, query directly the registry whois server, so whois.verisign-grs.com in your case. It will display various dates as well as status values, which are ...


1

A domain will be in its redemption period for 30 days and then in a "Pending Deletion" state for 5 days according to ICANN. According to personal experience, on the 6th day it will be available around 9AM Pacific Time. I have utilized domain backorder services before and I personally have been successful, but I have also heard some nightmare stories about ...


1

It depends on the registrar, but in most cases it takes between 65 and 85 days before an expired domain name is released and becomes available to be registered again.


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