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42

SSL certificates need to be installed in the server config, so for "typical web hosting" your hosting provider can easily restrict your ability to add your own certs (and even generating these without their support can be frustrating.) You should ask your provider if they can enable a free LetsEncrypt cert for you (they can be free and there are ...


12

Some hosting companies require that you pay them for their SSL certificates. It is not always possible to install a certificate from a third party. That being said, such a host is rare. Most hosting companies use cPanel or WHM to manage sites which support importing any certificate you want. The majority of web hosting companies will automatically get ...


7

Depending on your use case, one quick way of making a site SSL enabled would be to put it behind Cloudflare and use one of their free certificates. If you can get your web host to install a certificate they also provide free origin certificates, but even if your webhost only supports their own certificates this set up would get you SSL between the browser ...


6

To my knowledge Google does not give any special weight to HSTS as a ranking signal, though they do recommend using it. They do use HTTPS as a ranking signal. The best take-away I could get from these articles is that SEO reduces page load time by doing away with the time for a 301 redirect. This does not make sense to me as I would assume that Google would ...


4

Namecheap does not offer HTTPS for redirects. It would be better to implement the redirect at your hosting company so that they can do HTTPS for the redirect. This page has instructions about half way down for adding both www and no-www to Firebase and setting one to redirect to the other https://www.allwebtuts.com/add-a-custom-domain-on-google-firebase-...


4

CA's do not regularly check their customers websites, so they will likely not check if your site has turned malicious. The point of a Certificate is to give the end user comfort that the site they are dealing with is not being intercepted en-route, and - for EV certs - gives some assurances that the people behind the certificate are who they say they are. ...


3

I agree with Stephen's comment: HTTPS will not break the QR code itself. There might be some hosting reasons to keep your QR-encoded URL untouched. I guess you may want to avoid any HTTPS issue (old browsers, etc.) with this URL (and its children). Here are Apache directives which, in an .htaccess file, will redirect all requests to HTTPS, except http://(www....


3

One of your core assumptions is wrong - " the old domain with no website attached " You may not be paying for it, and it may be minimal, but for any web page redirect to occur the domain needs to be attached to a website. That website may simply be redirecting requests in its config and not have any web pages associated with it, but it does exist. ...


3

When I migrated some clients from a cpanel install to my "raw apache" based servers I simply copied the cpanel certs to my Apache server and installed them as part if the migration. I then used Letsencrypt to generate new certs after DNS had been migrated. As others have mentioned it is possible to use a DNS challenge as an alternative way of ...


3

Moving to a system using acme (or DNS if your systems have the hooks) and using Letsencrypt will likely the way to go. Certbot makes this easy. Total cost for certs is your time setting it up as a one off - no ongoing costs or manual cert installs and wide acceptance. Letsencrypt/Certbot doing ACME challenges is the way to go, is viable for 1 cert upwards - ...


2

using htaccess ( because its a shared environment. Using Cpanel. Aside: I would be wary about "preload list submission" on a shared server, since you don't have complete control (and it is easier / less prone to error to implement this in the main server config). Header set Strict-Transport-Security "max-age=31536000; includeSubDomains; ...


2

On May 18th you changed your nameservers from: ns10.nationbuilder.com ns11.nationbuilder.com ns12.nationbuilder.com ns13.nationbuilder.com ns14.nationbuilder.com ns15.nationbuilder.com to: ns41.domaincontrol.com ns42.domaincontrol.com Old nameservers resolve your name as: ;; ANSWER SECTION: davidkim2020.com. 2h40m IN A 96.45.82.241 davidkim2020.com. ...


2

As NuTTyX as said your name is in the SAN section. You can see it quickly that way: $ openssl s_client -connect copyurls.ml:443 -servername copyurls.ml -showcerts </dev/null |& grep -A100 'BEGIN CERTIFICATE' | grep -B100 'END CERTIFICATE' | openssl x509 -text -noout |& grep -A1 'X509v3 Subject Alternative Name' X509v3 Subject ...


2

Security Changing the links to HTTPS prevents a class of attacks against your users. When a user clicks off your site with a HTTP link, that request could easily be intercepted and changed. Instead of getting a 301 redirect to HTTPS, the attacker could instead feed malicious content to the user. Linking directly to the HTTPS site prevents that type of ...


2

I had the same problem. On the Settings->General page, there are two fields, "WordPress Address (URL)" and "Site Address (URL)", that had http in them instead of https. I update those fields and the problem went away.


2

The CA didn't check your website before issuing the certificate in the first place: it's their job to check the control of the domain for domain validated DV certificates and the identity of the owner for extended validation EV certificates. It's not their responsibility to validate the contents – nor even that they could given the amount of possible pages ...


2

There's nothing in the directives you've posted that would cause this directly. Throwing a regex at this isn't going help. The RewriteRule directive you posted redirects to http - end of. So, any "redirect" to HTTPS is coming from somewhere else. You need to examine the HTTP request/response headers in the browser. Are you actually seeing a 3xx ...


2

Once you use point the NS (name server) records to Bluehost, Google domains has no way of implementing the redirect. The steps for implementing the redirect are: Add a DNS entry for the host being redirected pointing to the web server that will do the redirect. Configure the web server to redirect requests for that domain to the desired location. Obtain ...


2

This message means that Google doesn't have enough "field data" collected from users of your website to give you page experience information. On Twitter Google's John Mueller says that this message is misleading: Unfortunately there's a bug there in Search Console. When we we show "Failing / Insufficient HTTPS coverage" in the Page ...


1

Okay, first do what it says: click on Edit methods -> Get record. You need to copy the value of the Host field and go to Domain list -> Select your domain and click Manage -> Advanced DNS -> ADD NEW RECORD -> Select CNAME RECORD -> Paste the value of Host that you just copied on the Host field of the CNAME Record. Now, copy the Target field'...


1

The method you have to redirect the domain doesn't support HTTPS. Godaddy has easy to use redirect options for domains with the DNS settings. However those redirects don't have SSL certificates and won't work the way you need. Godaddy has instructions for getting an SSL certificate to support HTTPS for your redirecting domain: https://www.godaddy.com/help/...


1

Found the reason on the Apple website: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT210176 The reason is not the CA, but the certificate itself: Additionally, all TLS server certificates issued after July 1, 2019 (as indicated in the NotBefore field of the certificate) must follow these guidelines: TLS server certificates must contain an ExtendedKeyUsage (EKU) ...


1

The short answer is that your web hosting provider is not running an HTTPS server on the IP address associated with their webserver. (As indicated by ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED ). I posit that if this is a default Namecheap setup that this is something they would need to rectify, but they may not be in a position to do so due to the substantial added complexity ...


1

Is it possible to redirect HTTPS requests for www.example.com.ar and example.com.ar to .com site? Or I should get another SSL certificate for .com.ar domain? You'll need an SSL cert that covers .com.ar. I know I have to create two virtual hosts in apache and in the htaccess file for .com.ar site put the rewrite rule If you are creating virtual hosts then ...


1

It's been a while since I've configured IIS, but if I recall correctly, the bindings will only identify that the new site is "listening" for the olddomain.com and forward to the active site, without telling your web client anything. On the other hand, if you create a "new site" for the old domain, and use a redirect, then you will also ...


1

Steve's answer is mostly correct: it is indeed possible for the content to differ between http and https versions of the page. One correction I'd suggest is that you don't actually need to do a redirect to accomplish this. For instance, with the Apache webserver, you could use the "Listen" directive to direct requests to different DocumentRoots. (...


1

It is possible to display different content for http or https by redirecting via htaccess, but then it would be a different page that would be loading. https is simply loading a SSL certificate, I suspect in very close to 100% of cases, the same page with the same content would be loaded.


1

It is impossible to redirect HTTPS without a certificate. You cannot redirect with via DNS alone. Even a CNAME record, which is a type of alias, is not a redirect. A CNAME simply says that all requests go to the same IP address as the specified domain name. It is up to the server how to handle those requests. It is the job of the web server to issue ...


1

Certificates can be issued for "Subject Alternative Names" (that is, more names that certificate is valid for) which covers your hostname (I've just checked that it covers both your domain and any subdomain). Also, consider that when you censor your browser's navigation bar, the title of the tab still shows the domain name and should be censored as ...


1

Your first code has 2 errors in the RewriteRule directive: ^$ does not capture anything, so $1 is always empty here. A slash is missing before $1, because if it could have captured something like Foo.html, the substitution URL would be of the form https://example.comFoo.html. Your second code seems valid to me, although the RewriteBase directive is useless ...


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