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There is a plugin for WordPress called SSL Insecure Content Fixer that will automatically change any calls to content from http to https. You can also use a find-and-replace plugin or use wp-cli to do a database-wide search for "http:" and replace it with "https:" but you run the risk of breaking links to sites that do not have SSL enabled.


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If you have a secure page (HTML delivered via HTTPS) that calls an image or any resource from a source that is not secure, the page will now be considered overall not secure. ... Mixed content affects the way your webpage is displayed by browsers. WordPress stores the full image URL in its post database. So after turning the website to HTTPS, you have to ...


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if ($_SERVER['HTTP_CACHE_CONTROL'] == 'no-cache') { Also bear in mind that the Cache-Control HTTP request header (as with most request headers) are entirely optional, so may not be present as part of the request at all. (This line would then generate an E_NOTICE under these conditions.) In fact, I don't believe Googlebot sends the Cache-Control header when ...


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You need to tell Google that your new domain name is your canonical domain name for the content on the site, otherwise Google won’t index the new domain since it is duplicating content. You can move to a new domain name by using 301 redirects from each page available on the old domain to the equivalent URL with the new domain. (Implementation of this ...


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Digest is the standard header used to convey the checksum of a selected representation of a resource (that is, the payload body). An example response with digest. >200 OK >... >Digest: sha-256=X48E9qOokqqrvdts8nOJRJN3OWDUoyWxBf7kbu9DBPE= > >{"hello": "world"} Digest may be used both in request and responses. It's a good practice to validate ...


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Browsers do send additional headers, but behavior different. This info in link a bit outdated: stackoverflow question Looks like Cache-control:no-cache is the best solution, to check for Ctrl+F5, but better to check not the only one header. Just checked on Firefox Ubuntu, F5 gives nothing, but Ctrl+F5 request contain this Pragma no-cache Cache-Control ...


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No. The browser will send the same information on a refresh as if the user had just come to that page, with the same referrer information. Hence the problem of double-POSTing if someone refreshes the destination page for a form. What you could do is have a refresh button on the page (as Google Ads used to have before they removed it), which you could use to ...


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