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No. The browser will send the same information on a refresh as if the user had just come to that page, with the same referrer information. Hence the problem of double-POSTing if someone refreshes the destination page for a form. What you could do is have a refresh button on the page (as Google Ads used to have before they removed it), which you could use to ...


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Browsers do send additional headers, but behavior different. This info in link a bit outdated: stackoverflow question Looks like Cache-control:no-cache is the best solution, to check for Ctrl+F5, but better to check not the only one header. Just checked on Firefox Ubuntu, F5 gives nothing, but Ctrl+F5 request contain this Pragma no-cache Cache-Control ...


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It is always better to have proper 404 responses. However, search engines can deal with both JS redirects to 404 pages and blank pages. They should treat them the same as a proper 404 error. There is a long history of web servers redirecting to error pages rather than showing a proper error status directly. Search engine bots have to be programmed to ...


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