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There should be no impact on your search engine rankings for an outage that lasts less than 24 hours. Google understands that occasional outages are unavoidable. They don't de-index pages or un-rank them just because of a single crawler error. The next day Googlebot should retry requesting the any pages that had errors. If it finds the pages then, your ...


4

It is my experience that Google generally does nothing for a previously indexed page when it sees a 5xx error. It may drop it from the SERPs temporarily if the 5xx error exists for too long. The page is not de-indexed. The reason is simple. 5xx errors are seen as temporary and likely to be fixed once discovered. I would focus on why your site is going ...


3

The screenshots indicate you are looking at the http and non www version of your site. The home page inspection report indicates that the home page for that site (http without www) is redirecting to the https with www version . https://www. and that it is not indexed because of that. That's from the "page with redirect" statement and what Google says it has ...


3

For SEO, the title and the meta tags of a 5xx page don't matter. Search engines bots see the HTTP status code and base their decisions only on that. They will ignore titles, meta descriptions, and noindex. For the most part, search engines do what you want. They never index content from the error page itself. For most error statuses, they retry the ...


3

So I finally reached out and contacted GoDaddy support. After an hour, we determined there might be an error in my code. And after a little bit of digging and testing with some basic files, he was right. I added the following to my index.php file... error_reporting(E_ALL); ini_set('display_errors', 1); AND LOW AND BEHOLD: Fatal error: Uncaught Error: ...


3

I've been able to reset a lot of my site's values using appcmd, but I had to dig into specific configurations I wanted to change, which I'll describe a bit below. I know for sure that this works with IIS 7, but I'm not 100% certain whether it passed on to 7.5 so YMMV. appcmd isn't in my cmd path on any of my installations (though these machines are 2k8sp2) -...


2

Sounds like you have not taken into consideration that Google crawls sites all across the globe but primary these crawls do occur more often in .US data centers. You could override this by using a user agent detect script that allows the Googlebot regardless of its GEO location, however you should also take into note that Google doesn't view this solution as ...


2

WordPress by default will uncompress to /wordpress/ from the downloadable archive, this is because the compressed file contains the parent directory labelled wordpress. If you then run the installer from this folder it will automatically set the path to this location within the SQL. Unless your using a SEO plugin that controls the SEF URLS then there is ...


2

but when I encounter a 500 Internal Server Error, it gives the default Internal Server Error The problem is that custom 500 error documents simply don't get triggered for errors in .htaccess - which is what's happening here. As Aakash has already quoted, this may come under the realm of a "malformed request". If you check your error log it should state: "...


2

I would try two things - Check permissions of 500.html (try setting it to 777 to be very sure - modify it later). Try 500.htm (or 500.txt) instead of 500.html (just to be sure that your other rules in htaccess are not messing up with the ErrorDocument 500.html page). Also, remember to change the htaccess ErrorDocument rule to 500.htm (or 500.txt). Also, ...


2

There is no SEO Risk from temporary errors on your site. Google is very forgiving of small amounts of down time. Down time lasting less than a day will generally not hurt your site from an SEO perspective. When Googlebot encounters a 404 or 500 error on a page that it has found in the past, it tries again for 24 hours before removing the page from the ...


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It depends on whether crawlers attempted to visit the site during that time. If not, then "no one noticed" that your site was down. Even if one crawler visited, others may not have. So there is no way to tell whether or not there will be an impact.


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There are some good answers here. The bottom line is that a 500-series error tells the search engine "there's a temporary issue right now, come back later". The search engine will do just that - come back later. It won't index or really even read any of the content on the error page, so don't worry about that. In summary, just the 500-series status code is ...


2

It is always best to show errors at the original URL rather than redirecting. For SEO, Google knows how to deal with 500 errors. It will give the page some grace time (probably 24 hours) and if the error doesn't go away it will stop indexing it. Google will probably treat a redirect to a 500 error the same way, but there is no guarantee. In general, ...


2

I'm guessing that your URL change is unrelated to the error. A 500x error usually means a server side processing error, like unable to render the page or there's bug in the server side code on the page (PHP, ASPX, etc). 400x errors typically mean the page doesn't exist. Since Google is showing you a 500 error, are you sure it's because the file doesn't ...


1

PHP syntax errors do not trigger a real 500 error No, it's certainly a "real 500 error", it's just that it's triggered by PHP and not Apache, which is why the Apache ErrorDocument does not get triggered. (In much the same way if your PHP script returns a 404 Not Found response, Apache doesn't step in and respond with the defined 404 ErrorDocument.) PHP ...


1

It seems that in the public_html folder there is no index.html or index.php (or other). Are you sure after the upload there is at least a file name index.php? Can you check in ftp or file manager and see if the file is really there?


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you would need to handle this at a higher level(proxy / F5) - a 500 of apache is a failure of it's runtime. Alternatively, you could build(or find, i couldn't find) a middleware mod for apache which is able to wrap any exception in an evaluation process (think try and catch) - this would need to be a mod and would need to essentially wrap every method of the ...


1

I get a 500 error or a 404 or a "Forbidden you are not authorized" error. The code you posted should result in a 403 Forbidden for all visitors. The first <IfModule> block applies to Apache 2.2 (and below) and the second block applies to Apache 2.4+ (strictly Apache 2.3+). Although the first block alone would "work" on both Apache 2.2 and 2.4 if you ...


1

Internal server errors can have multiple causes: Code syntax errors that happen whenever you hit a particular page Problems parsing user data that only happen for a specific user Intermittent problems caused by something like the database going down It is not surprising that different crawling bots find different numbers of 500 errors. You may have some ...


1

I haven't scoped for AddHandler application/x-httpd-php56 .php but I stake the following on all of my websites: <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} !^443$ RewriteRule (.*) https://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R,L] RewriteBase / RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L] RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteCond %{...


1

I'd do it this way: RewriteEngine on # Check if the requested url stats with /dl/ RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/dl/ #if so, redirect everything to dl.php, placing everything in $_GET['url']: RewriteRule ^dl/files/(.*) /dl.php?url=$1 [L] Requesting http://www.example.com/dl/files/my_file.zip will result in calling dl.php, where $_GET['url'] == 'my_file.zip'....


1

I have a WordPress website that's being served, but with a 500 status code. First, start on a clean slate. If this site is live to the public, replace the main index page with a page that shows users the website is under construction. Make a backup of the old index page first. This may be index.php since you're using wordpress. If it isn't then look for ...


1

Robots.txt does not block search engines from indexing a URL, only from visiting a URL. So what is likely happening is that Googlebot is getting an idea of your page based on its inbound links and indexing it, even though it knows it can't actually make a request to that page to retrieve and index its content. From Google Webmasters: Blocking Google from ...


1

Strangely enough, I got it to work by deleting some already-deactivated plugins. Someone suggested I'd deactivate plugins, so there's where I headed and it worked well. One was WP Super Cache, because I switched to W3 Cache. Another was XML Sitemap plugin. All works good now, thanks everyone!


1

If the 500 error is coming from your own site, you should be able to address the problem by looking in the server's error log. 500 errors are produced any time something happens that the web server is not expecting. It is unusual to see a 500 error with the full content of the page, but it is not unheard of. The server log will have the cause of the error ...


1

a 500 error means a problem with the server, which most of the time, is caused by wrong rules on the .htaccess file. Assuming that your site is hosted in a hosting company and considering that you can access the site using a data connection, but not wifi, basically means that one of the IPs is being blocked. The external IP from the router. It may also ...


1

It might be worth turning on detailed error messages in IIS so you can find out what's causing that 500 error. By default IIS will not show detailed errors unless you're requesting the page from localhost.


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I do not think it is related to file size at all. Most probably, some of your lines are problematic, maybe contains control characters or such. Your best bet would be to try adding lines one by one and reloading, and see when you start getting errors - the line you added is likely the culprit (of course, you can optimize this one_by_one by adding half of ...


1

I think you want to remove the .php extension, so I'll give the .htaccess code to accomplish that: RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME}\.php -f RewriteRule ^(.*)$ $1.php That should be located in the root directory. So suppose there is a file in the root folder named index.php, you can then access it at: ...


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