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2

It looks like you are making this more complex than it actually is. Unless you need to be specific about matching "club", it looks like you just need to remove the first path segment when it looks like a 2-letter language code and move this to the lang URL parameter in the query string instead. For this you can do the following, near the top of ...


3

tl;dr You probably just need to give Google more time to resolve the canonical issue, but the failure to find the site based solely on the domain name is not necessarily fixable. These are two unrelated issues. Just because the "other" search engines return your site for a match on the domain name does not necessarily make them correct. If I search ...


2

Is this a proper method for blocking bad bots? Well, it is one method. (Although you wouldn't block whole user-agent strings using regex alternation; if that is what you are implying by your CondPattern?) However, "bad bots" often do not disclose themselves using an easily identifiable user-agent. They may use a standard browser user agent, which ...


3

It looks like you might have a conflict with existing directives, however, you can try changing your existing directives to see if it makes a difference: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTPS} !on RewriteRule (.*) https://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301] Providing the .htaccess file is located in the examplecom/public_html directory then the captured ...


1

Because the Redirect directive matches against the %-decoded URL-path. %e2%80%9d is a URL-encoded "closing curly quote" (U+201D: RIGHT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK). For example Redirect 301 "/aor/”" https://www.example.com/outlook-repair/ You need to ensure your .htaccess file is saved with a UTF-8 encoding. Reference: https://httpd.apache.org/...


0

TO override parent htaccess, it worked for me to add new .htaccess to the child directory with the line: RewriteEngine off


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