4

Edit: Stephen makes a good point about the nature of your question. - should you be using parent pages? A parent page is a top-level page of a hierarchy - they have nested child pages. If you are using your site’s default menu, parent pages will usually show in the menu with child pages as a drop down. Child pages should be more specific than parent pages ...


3

It depends what you're trying to do. Do you want to rank with the homepage? Or do you have posts and pages that target the keywords? "Static page option" in WordPress makes sense for some websites and strategies, and of course it depends how well you optimize the static page. You'll have more control over it, so you could craft the perfect landing ...


3

If by no traffic you mean no traffic from search engines you can delete it. If its being spidered by engines but not receiving hits it might be contributing to your site by providing keywords (assuming its linked), although this is likely to be very minor if no one is actually finding and viewing your blog.


3

There is a simple way if you want the rules to be followed but not enforce them against deliberate spoofing. This looks something like this: RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^http://www.example.com/.*$ RewriteRule (.+) - [R=404,L] Someone with intent on bypassing this can spoof the referrer though. A better way would be for you to enforce ...


2

I've not tried this as my environment makes doing so tricky, but I posit something along the following lines will work in .htaccess RewriteBase / RewriteRule ^index\.php$ - [L] RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !www\.example\.com [NC] RewriteRule ^ -[R=404,L] Of-course replace www.example.com with your actual domain, and if your default file is not index.php ...


2

The danger of using latest posts on the home page is duplicate content. By default, WordPress uses the full text of each of several posts on the home page. That will cause Google to index your home page, but not index the permalink pages for each individual post. To combat this, you should edit each post and ensure that you use the more tag after the ...


1

A text-light home page is usually fine for SEO. The home page has two important SEO functions: Rank for your brand name. Link to your most important content. Your page with little text and just two links still should accomplish both of those goals. In order to rank for your brand name, the title of your page should start with your brand name. You could ...


1

Google does not like redirects to the home page. It treats redirects to the home page exactly like the page returned a "404 Not Found" status. Google calls such redirects "soft 404" errors. Redirect to the home page appear in the soft 404 report in Google Search Console. Google documents this practice at https://support.google.com/...


1

A redirect to a dissimilar page will not pass any link juice (SEO value). In your case, you have mentioned that you are going to redirect several URLs (naturally different from the homepage) to the homepage. Hence you cannot expect link juice.


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The main question is what does your server do in that instance? If the answer is when you visit: /page and /page/ Does one redirect to the other? or do both resolve in the browser? If the latter, then you should investigate making them uniform, and resolving on one canonical url. The reason is that /page and /page/ whilst the same from a content ...


1

I can't comment on SEO, it is a dark art I am not sure anyone really understands. But to have a members only area, first thing you need to do is to authenticate someone - they need to login. So in theory your default home page should appeal to everyone. Include on it a link to "member login" and then once they have done that you can redirect them ...


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