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13

Fragment identifiers are traditionally used to identify a portion of document for client-side applications. As stated in the specification Google adopted: Traditionally, hash fragments (that is, everything after # in the URL) have been used to indicate one portion of a static HTML document. ...hash fragments are not part of HTTP requests (and as a ...


4

From the mod_rewrite documentation you need to use the NE (no escape) flag when your rewrite rule has a hash: RewriteRule #(.+)$ /? [L,R=301,NE] You commented that the NE flag may only apply to the target URL and not the rewrite pattern. If that is the case, another approach would be to escape the # sign. mod_rewrite supports \x style escape sequences. ...


2

Apache and Lighthttpd both have a directory listing mod that you need to enable, often by default these are disabled for security reasons. You can enable indexing by doing the following: Lighthttp To enable directory listings globally: dir-listing.activate = "enable" If you need it only for a directory, use conditionals: $HTTP["url"] =~ "^/download($|/)"...


2

Google understands that anchor links are the same page with or without the anchor. Example: example.com/page and example.com/page#div Google understands that these are the same pages. And so there is no duplicate content issues. Anchor links are a very common and useful URL protocol across the web. It can be very helpful for example.com/kittens to link to ...


2

The #! indication in the URL was used to indicate Google that this section of the page appears on the page after the JavaScript has been executed. For example you have a section on your page example.com/page1#about which makes an AJAX call. In order to make this URL crawlable by Google you had to change this to example.com/page1#!about so that Google ...


1

URLs with hashes are generally ignored by majority of Search Engines as it contains a block of information which can be found in the same page. This is not related to the crawl budget or link juice, as the URL is treated as one single landing page. In majority of cases, links with "#" are given less importance. The best way to pass value to whatever ...


1

As it was mentioned in comments, the simplest possibility to address tabs with urls, is to address them with parameters instead of hashes, like http://www.example.com/page-1?tab=2. While you correctly said, hashes will not be passed through the server to Google, parameters will. A kind of solution is described under https://css-tricks.com/better-linkable-...


1

The best thing you can do is setting the canonical meta tag for all pages with filtered views (sort by, ascendant, descendant, price range, etc), to let bots know which is the original page and which one should be indexed. So when URL is: example.com/#!explore/world:sortby=date Canonical meta tag should be set to: <link rel="canonical" href="example....


1

On a cPanel installed server, the entry for cPanel password is made in /etc/shadow file itself. Whenever a cPanel user is created, a user is added on your Linux server. So, every entry for the password is made in /etc/shadow file for every cPanel user you create.


1

I'm going to answer my own questions here: The title that Google displays in the SERPs is not necessarily the same as the title of the page. Google alters the title based on what you search for. This happens only when Google thinks the title is over-optimized. Also, the title can come from DMOZ or similar if NOODP meta is not set. All hash-bang URLs don't ...


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