11

I've never seen image lazy loading have any negative impact on web search rankings. Improving the perceived performance of your site for users can really help your rankings. When fewer people bounce back to the search results because of performance problems with your site, your rankings will improve. Google will not be able to index lazy loaded images for ...


10

No, unless you do a search with the correct license. When you do an image search, there is an option to select the license. Go to Images. Enter a search term. You should see a Tools button toward the left side. Click on it. It becomes gray and a set of dropdowns appear toward the right side. Click on Usage Rights and select your expected usage. "Labeled ...


5

Will google still crawl to Full_Res_Image and index that in web as well as google images? Yes. If it does crawl to the full res image, how do I then set alt tags on the full res image? You can't but you can still use other indicators of content such as: Use the alt attribute on the cropped image. By being the effective anchor text of that link it would ...


5

Short answer NO. The purpose of the canonical tag is duplicated content, not media. Google's John Mueller talks about image canonical in this office hours hangout video from Aug 12, 2016. (56:24) For images, we don't use the rel canonical. So if you have the rel canonical header in the images themselves, we don't use that.


5

Definitely not. There are a number of websites that do offer free images that can be used for commercial purposes. CC Search will allow you to search a number of online venues for suitable images https://search.creativecommons.org/


4

The alt attribute of the img tag is part of the content of the page, it should therefore be in the same context as the rest of the page (unless it is purely decorative in which case you probably shouldn't have any alt text, or use a background-image, etc.) You could have the same image that is used on two different pages and the subject of those pages could ...


4

Moving images to a CDN is similar to migrating the URLs of other content. Use a subdomain of your main domain (images.example.com), don't use the CDN domain name (893.mebes.bigbadcdnhost.tld) Use 301 permanent redirect (www.example.com/images/foo.jpg to images.example.com/images/foo.jpg) Update your site so that you refer to the images at their new URLs ...


4

If you have access to the source then you could consider using SVG, that way Google can read the text. – from Simon Hayter in comments If you just want the text indexed for search engines and don't care about accessibility, then you can add a caption to the image in the sitemap: <image:image> <image:loc>https://example.com/image.png</...


4

The Google crawler is detecting the text inside the span element as the caption of the image in question. There is no way to make Google use the title attribute instead as Google prioritises what's visible to the end user. In addition to that Google uses its extensive experience in image detection and evaluation to identify how to tag images. If you want to ...


3

Google scans your source code for items that look like URLs and will try to crawl them and index them, even if they are not in an <a href. Based on the crawling that Googlebot has done on my site, Google seems to think that strings in the page source are URLs if: They end in a common page extension such as "html", "htm", or "php". They contain a slash ...


3

When you search for site:www.example.com images on Google, you're looking for pages on www.example.com that contain the word images. Try searching for site:www.example.com on Google Image Search. I've seen 16x16 pixel icons on Google Image Search, so your image size shouldn't be a problem.


3

tl;dr I think your images are indexed OK, but you are simply not able to see all the images that Google has indexed. i did search in google image search and counted the number of images. it was around only 500. Curious, I see considerably more when performing a site: search for your real site on Google Image search. But there are more than 500 images in ...


3

You should try to adopt a smart naming convention for your image file names since search engines will look at the file name when understanding what it contains. If you can't make the filenames unique with keywords then at least make them unique using Tom's name and a number, maybe also a year, image size, another celebrity in the image or something that can ...


3

First off all, I think that it's imperative that everyone understand what an "alt tag" (alt being short for "alternative") is in the first place. The accessibility portion of the Penn State site describes it well: "a clear text alternative of the image for screen reader users." You may or may not know that individuals who are using a screen reader are ...


3

Sitemaps for images can help Google discover images that it hasn't discovered. If there are pages with images on your site that Google hasn't found, or you have images on your server that aren't on crawlable pages, you can list them in your sitemaps to have Google discover them and add them to their image search results. Google will decide to index any ...


3

Only one version of the image should be included in your image sitemap. You can submit whichever size version you prefer, however, particularly when using common CMSes which auto-resize your images as required, this is usually the original version of the file which should be correctly sized as the largest version of the file required on your site. If you ...


3

is it better to save the image file under different filenames no, redundancy is never good. Beside of file name there is hash value, allowing to identify an image. An the hash will be always the same, independently of path and file name. So it will be a kind of duplicated contet, which is just a bit harder to recognize. Don't expect any additional ...


2

It may be because the image is being served from Google's server rather than your server in the image preview. Let me give you an example. I did a Google image search for "scenery". I changed the search tools to only look for "large" images, and I found this: As you can see it is shown in very poor quality with obvious JPEG artifacts in the sky around ...


2

First, are you aware that your website's robots.txt has the following in it? User-agent: Googlebot-Image Disallow: / This will prevent all images from being indexed in Google's Image Search. See this for more on that: prevent images from appearing in Image Search. Secondly, although Google can crawl some AJAX, it depends on how it's presented. I would ...


2

this http://www.webpronews.com/could-googles-safesearch-be-costing-you-traffic-by-filtering-your-safe-images-2013-10 may help you, but in general check the following: check your text content and image filenames for things that Google could view as adult words make sure your outbound links aren’t pointing to any adult areas make sure you’re not hosted on the ...


2

If you append any of the words "images", "pictures", or "photos" to your query, Google will assume that you are looking for images. See the following examples: cat pictures cat images cat photos But if you search for just "cats", Google doesn't show the images. They try to determine whether the searcher is looking for images based on the query. The ...


2

I am assuming Apache and .htaccess. From: https://perishablepress.com/creating-the-ultimate-htaccess-anti-hotlinking-strategy/ RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$ RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} \.(gif|jpe?g?|png)$ [NC] RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^https?://([^.]+\.)?domain\. [NC] ...


2

Perhaps you don't understand how google image search works. Like regular google searches it will return all results for the search word/phrase. So unless your name or search is unique there will be multiple results. If you are searching for your image by name there are a few things you ought be aware of. Is there actually an image with your name ...


2

You need to get a 301 redirect command added to the "wordpress.com" web server. The basic free service doesn't provide this capability. https://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/is-there-a-301-redirects-manager?replies=2#post-2356582 None of the non-Enterprise subscriptions support adding your own plugin https://en.support.wordpress.com/plugins/ There are 2 ...


2

Googleimagebot doesn't index - it crawls. It crawls every image, what it gets in your source code. Are pathes to your "big" images exist in the source code? I guess for sure they are, even if they are loaded in the lightbox (which is nothing other as a specially formatted div) with help of any lightbox javascript. So don't worry about indexing of them - ...


2

Why not use different filenames for each image on each page and in each image itself, make slight modifications to emphasize each section of the dining room such as adding text in the image indicating to the user what is being emphasized. For example, on site A, you'd have the image file http://example.com/static/dining-room.jpg with the word "dining room" ...


2

Mike's answer above is nice and I would follow it myself. However if you really need to reuse the file (save storage, better cache, etc. ) you could concatenate the title and description in sitemap to the limit size that Google recommends. Since you have the pages (with related text or comments from members) to backup your images, it would be legit to SEO


2

The first question you should know answer to is: is your image worth to rank? If yes, explain it to Google with following methods: Images should be better unique. They should have well descriptive alt and title Alt and title of image should correlate with url, title, h1 and topic of the textual content, where the image is in Image (and article) should ...


2

Unfortunately, images are hard for search engines to create search results for. There are some clues of course. Here is what can be done. 1] The image alt text. The alt text should be a sentence with a subject, predicate, and object to allow better semantics analysis. Make the sentence as reasonably verbose as possible and not overly simple or too complex. ...


2

If you post with exactly same text and images then you should avoid doing that. Instead just share the link on social media with one to 2 line message. Also, as a good SEO practice, you should focus on good length content on your website and just share the link on social media. Google algorithm takes several factors into consideration to identify duplicate ...


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