9

It seems that you can't permanently delete goals in GA, the only action you can take is to deactivate them. For the time being you can request to add that delete feature here "Google bugs project" Some people recommend to add goals to separate profile than the main one, so when you are done with them you can easily delete the whole goals' profile without ...


5

@Geoff Jackson helped me to write this little how to. If you have a website with a lot of Ajax in use or just steps/goals that you can not identify via URL you will have to use extra pageview-tracking. That is because Google Analytics does not allow custom events or dimensions in their goal steps. Example: On each page of your website is a button that ...


5

Why not just set it up as an event and then track the event. It will appear in the Events section of your Google Analytics profile and you can also set up a goal based on that event. You can create the event here.


4

Of course, you can. It's as simple as creating the tags in Google Tag Manager and set up those events in Google Analytics as Goals. However, in this scenario, you can send the data to Analytics as events or virtual pageviews. As events, you can check them in the event's report and as virtual pageviews, you can work with them as usual URLs inside Analytics. ...


3

I figured it out. What happens is that users who are not logged in yet get redirected to the sign in page and the GA code doesn't get executed until after they are redirected back after they login. So the login page gets a new client id. The solution I came up with was to tweak with the redirection logic (devise) and to pass the _ga parameter to the login ...


3

In order to get a conversion from Adwords is required an initial click, so, the answer to your question is that there will be no problem at all. On Facebook, you can see all the conversions for all the traffic sources, although the only ones associated to a campaign will be the ones that come from a click on the ad.


3

This depends on where you are looking for the goal conversions. If you look at Conversions > Goals > Goal URLs, all conversions will be attributed to the home page since that's where they literally occurred. However, if you go to Behavior > Site Content > Landing Pages, you should see conversions attributed to the blog pages -- after a quick change to the ...


3

You're right that it's tracking only the final page, but it doesn't mean your funnel is broken. You've run into an aspect of Google Analytics that is confusingly named. "Required" in a destination goal funnel does not mean "required for the goal to convert", it only means "required for the conversion to show in the Conversions > Goals > Funnel Visualization ...


2

Providing that you're only passing non-personal, anonymous information as covered here, there shouldn't be any downsides. This could help identify repeat purchases by individuals, as well as provide helpful information about conversions paths, such as which devices they're using to purchase your products with, as covered here by Google.


2

You are looking at visits, so consider this case: [Item Page] -> [Purchase] -> [Purchase] -> [Checkout] i.e. the user got some sort of error on the purchase page, refreshes the page etc., which will count the a second visit on this page, but the entire funnel is still valid. You have to look really careful about what is tracked and what are the possible ...


2

I found the solution to the problem myself and I would like to post the answer in here just in case someone goes through the same struggle. Basically the Goal value did not match the value in the function. The Goals configuration page looked like this I noticed the message under the "Use the Event value as the Goal value for the conversion" (Answered "YES"...


2

All those parameters are available as Primary or Secondary dimensions in your Standard reports. If you look at @inkovic's screenshot at the top, you see the header, "Primary Dimension", and then there's "Campaign". Similarly, you can search for the Content (it's called "Ad Content"). If you want, you can even create a Custom Report which shows you all your ...


2

The validation conversion rate is just a "prediction", but when you see you actual conversion rate it is 0 because the goal hasn't taken effect yet. You will need to wait a day for conversion rates to be non-zero, assuming you get actual conversion until then. Goals are not retroactive either.


2

The predicted goal conversion rate (ie. 0.78% in your case) is an estimate of the rate of conversion if your configuration were to be applied to past data, which of course it will not do. Also, data processing of goal conversion (and all GA) data takes some time, usually up to 24 hours, so your reports will still show 0 until the data has been processed.


2

Opening new tabs or windows does not cause Google Analytics to start a new session for the user. Google Analytics starts new sessions when: There is no existing session cookie The existing session is more than 30 minutes old There is an external referrer on the request None of these apply to a request opened in a new tab.


2

You need to wait at least 24 hours for data to be processed into your standard GA reports. You could also try to verify in your Real-Time reports where you will see the conversion increase if it is successfully tracked.


2

Using GA Campaign tagging on internal links is not recommended as they will override the original source/medium of the visitor. There are so many ways this can be done. The quickest/easiest to get up and running with would be event tracking. Clicks to links would usually be tracked via event tracking triggered by an onclick. Banner/image 'impressions' ...


2

From https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2976313?hl=en Backfilling Funnel Steps What happens if someone skips one of the steps in the funnel? The Funnel Visualization report backfills any skipped steps between the step at which the user entered the funnel and the step at which the user exited the funnel. For example, let's say your ...


2

Google tag manager and Google Analytics can't run on redirect URLs. When a browser hits a redirect URL, it only uses the HTTP headers. It looks at the Location: header to figure out where the redirect is going. It doesn't use any of the HTML or JavaScript that comes in the body of the response. Your server isn't going to even include your GTM or GA ...


2

The simplest solution would be to redirect the user back to the home page with a URL parameter: http://example.com/?now-premium Adding a URL parameter to the URL usually shows the same content, but creates a different URL that can be used as a destination goal in Google Analytics. A different solution would be to send an event from the home page when the ...


2

Goal funnels only affect the goal funnel report. All other goal reports will record a goal conversion if someone reaches the goal destination URL. With funnels, only the first step can be marked as a required step, in which case, entrances lower in the funnel will not be shown in the funnel chart, and only those site visitors that fulfill the first step ...


2

The event value is an integer and should not be within quote characters. ga('send', 'event', 'Captain', 'Click', 'Captain telegram', 1); https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/analyticsjs/events#event_fields As the link is using target="_blank", the visitor leaving the page should not be an issue as the initial page with the ...


1

It shouldn't cause a problem at all. I think you're applying human thinking to a computer problem. If the pages are different then analytics will treat them as separate chains of links. No issue whatsoever. Of course the actual issue is with someone looking at the different reports / goals in 6 months remember the differences, and report correctly back to ...


1

I found out this is called Multi-Channel Funnels and is already inside Google analytics under Conversions tab.


1

That should be all you need. You just need to test it. Here's what I have for a form that includes validation (ie. error message appear if a required field is in error):


1

What you need to do is create multiple goals that are based on the final URL and the paths taken. The trick then is to trigger a pseudo pageview via an event when the user clicks on one of the radio buttons and then set that page as a required step in the conversion funnel path. Google Tag Manager is much better equipped to deal with situations like this. ...


1

My bad...it is apparent that the number given in Google Analytics is the 'Unique Pageviews' metric for the basket page, and not the total pageviews, which does account for multiple visits. I.e. if the same customer visits the basket twice in a session, it's only counted once; but (importantly) if they visit in another session, this is counted again.


1

Goal Flow report let you see data based on pageviews, so you can analyze page by page. It's not like funnel visualization that is visits based. So, in that scenario, your visitor would report as an exit in the first visit, then as a goal completed in the second. More here: http://www.lunametrics.com/blog/2012/08/06/goal-flow-how-visitors-really-move-...


1

Go to Other > Acquisition > Source


1

I found a question on Stack Overflow here related to using JavaScript to track Flash objects. It's best if you use onmousedown() like this: <div onmousedown="clickBanner(1)"> <object> <param name="movie" value="3.swf"> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <embed wmode=transparent allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="...


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