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8

I've been looking at this too, and I believe they fall under the category of pseudonymous data (most information taken from this helpful page): Article 4(5) ‘pseudonymisation’ means the processing of personal data in such a manner that the personal data can no longer be attributed to a specific data subject without the use of additional information, ...


7

First of all, I'm not a lawyer but after reading the new law and analyzing Analytics, that's how I've been working since GDPR. The problem is that you can't track any user information without their consent, so, I started turning down all tracking functions. This is my roadmap: Avoid cookies using the function: storage: none Anonymize the IP with ...


6

Why do the details not show by default This is because of the GDPR, which brought in a lot of personal data protections, and resulted in a large amount of changes to WHOIS, in order to try to make it compliant. How do I get my details shown If you want your details to show, you need to provide authorization for this, which you can find more information ...


5

What is the issue here GDPR allows you control of your data, but it is not strongly defined who owns chat messages. This will probably be solved once there have been court cases on the matter, which is likely to be soon, as many large tech companies have been sued. Options You own all copies of messages you have sent This has the issue that senders could ...


4

The Google Search Console site you are looking at is specific to http. You need to also verify your new https site with the Google Search Console to see how it is performing. That drop for http is standard when you move to https. You should see the other property shows a sudden increase.


4

I think the answer is no. This page says Not all cookies are used in a way that could identify users, but the majority are and will be subject to the GDPR. That sounds like if there is no personal identifying information involved, such as just a high score, then GDPR doesn't apply.


3

When moving from http to https you will see http drop and https rise until all the 301 and 410 are integrated into https (google webmaster tools treats each protocol as different sites) As how to proceed, in my experience you just add the https version as a new property, set up the redirects in your server: use 302 (found) until you are sure the urls are ...


3

It sounds like the problem here is people are already not very engaged with your emails. I see two approaches to reach your audience before the deadline: Send another email, but make it engaging. Instead of just "Action required - opt in to keep receiving emails" as the main message, include a coupon, or a whitepaper, or something that has proven in the ...


3

I'm no lawyer, but under the current UK Data Protection Act, personal data is broadly defined as: "any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person ('data subject'); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number,...


3

The cookie notice/consent is apart of the Directive 2002/58/EC while The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) replaces the 95/46/EC Data Protection Directive. They are not the same but work in a relationship. You will need to ensure your site complies with DIRECTIVE 2002/58/EC and REGULATION (EU) 2016/679 , most often complying with one may comply ...


2

The GDPR is about tracking people and cookies. If you do either, then you're definitely not off the hook. The fact that you reduce the duration of the cookie may help in some ways, but it doesn't change the fact that you have to have the "We're using cookies" warning for your European users. Of course, by using session cookies, Google Analytics won't be ...


2

It looks like contractors do fall under GDPR; but in certain situations do not have to register. The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is aimed at all organisations or individuals who hold or use personal data for business or other organisational activities, regardless of their size or structure. General GDPR requirements include using personal ...


2

You should look at what “legitimate interests” are under GDPR: https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/legitimate-interests/when-can-we-rely-on-legitimate-interests/ ICO provides a really good checklist what legitimate interests are and when you can rely on this: You can rely on legitimate interests for ...


2

You need to look at: Your home country laws on privacy, i.e. India The country where you host/collect/process data through, i.e. USA The countries where your customers are, i.e. USA, Canada, EU You can look at India IT Act of 2000 act for how to comply, i.e. monitor user-generated content, follow best practices on privacy and user data etc. USA has two ...


2

So there are a couple of things you should be considering. Setting Cookies If you are setting a cookie on your website and passing this on to a 3rd party, this counts as personal identifiable information (PII). If you want to set this cookie, you need a user to opt-in, then set the cookie. If you want a simple way to do this, have a look at [this google ...


2

I am not a lawyer, however, I would not consider using information which the user freely provided in an expected manner would fall under activities restricted by the GDPR. To confirm, let's consult the GDPR: The aim of the GDPR is to protect all EU citizens from privacy and data breaches in today’s data-driven world. As you can see from the statement of ...


2

I am not a lawyer nor do I reside in the EU, but to the best of my understanding GPDR is a law about user tracking, not a law about which browser APIs you can use. In the eyes of the law it doesn't matter whether the Service Worker API is able to be used to uniquely identify and track a visitor - the law only cares about whether you actually use the API to ...


2

You do not need to hide the GDPR efforts from Google at all. If at all, it is an excellent signal towards any search engine that you are law abiding and you have Privacy Policy in place and take Data Protection serious. Your banner consists of 15 words - it doesn’t dilute anything. Besides, good SEO means that you are optimising for your User, not for the ...


1

What needs to change with WHOIS At the moment the private details of registrants are included in the publicly accessible WHOIS data. The argument for nobody having access is that people like their privacy, and do not like spam and unwanted phone calls. This is covered by the GDPR, as users have the right to object, which the ICO describes with regards to ...


1

Should non-consenting visitors be kicked out It depends on the use of the cookie, as this ICO page says: An online furniture store requires customers to consent to their details being shared with other homeware stores as part of the checkout process. The store is making consent a condition of sale – but sharing the data with other stores is not necessary ...


1

It's the responsibility of the business owner. However, web developers can certainly help educate the client what she needs to implement on the website or app to be compliant. For example, under GDPR, the business is the data controller and/or data processor. If your client asks you to insert the tracking code to enable behavioral retargeting on the website,...


1

You can do this by loading your scripts using a simple if cookie check, e.g JavaScript Native: navigator.cookieEnabled JavaScript Library: Modernizer 'Cookies' PHP: $_COOKIE


1

As long as you do not collect personal data of a human, you do not need a GDPR. Please note, log files with IP addresses are personal data for GDPR.


1

After some research and tests, I figured out the answer on this. IPv6 addresses have a size of 128 bits. An IPv6 address is represented as eight groups of four hexadecimal digits, each group representing 16 bits (two octets, a group sometimes also called a hextet[6][7]). The groups are separated by colons (:). So, as each group represents 16 bits, ...


1

It's pretty hard to answer your question, since you are missing some much needed information. It depends on how you collect the information as well, and since I am not a lawyer, I cannot and will not hand out legal advice. From my understanding you have several options on how to collect your forms information: You integrate a pre-made external form as an ...


1

Topical at this point in time - but boring too. This is a jurisdictional legal question. It needs legal advice for technical correctness. I'd be very surprised if any jurisdiction classifies anonymous visitor data (i.e. logs) as personal/protected/private data. But if you're worried, you can seek legal advice. A small disclaimer on the bottom of your ...


1

According to https://www.cookielaw.org/faq/#WereoutsideoftheEUareweaffected technically you don't need to display the cookie consent banner as you do not legally have an entity within the EU, the site is not hosted and domains not registered within the EU zone. I would always recommend a privacy policy as it helps establish trust between you and your target ...


1

Technically, EU privacy policy is strictly for web pages within EU. So, you don't need to put it quite frankly. But... make your privacy policy for the web, look how are they written, then you write it for yourself for your page. But, then again, you don't need to do that for Indian domains.


1

Do you need to? No, of course not. But you'll be out of compliance if you don't. Whether you target EU visitors or not is immaterial. If they arrive at your site, you need to get consent. You need to disclose in plain language what personal data you collect, how you collect it, under what legal basis (there are only a few valid legal bases), and who else ...


1

GDPR is not a regulation for marketing but about how you collect and handle personally identifiable information (PII) during it's whole life cycle. This question is actually about the lawfulness of processing (Art. 6 GDPR). You delimit your problem quite reasonably with this key phrase: alert users of updates ... in relation to what they subscribed for ...


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