Hot answers tagged

4

As an end user, the simple answer to this is "just don't allow the banner to run." The term "banner" suggests to me that the applet is nonessential, i.e. blocking it wouldn't prevent the page from working. As a webmaster, the obvious answer is to just accept that Flash is dead and remove the applet, as 90% of your users are not going to see it anyways ...


2

Companies that use Flash have a workflow with it and have no reason to change, perhaps. They have the tools and the talent to use it so why change? Flash is readily available on Windows still but it's a heavy thing to have, often requires installation and updating and mobile devices can bog down (the reason Apple doesn't allow Flash on mobile). It should be ...


2

The same reason they still support insecure connection modes.... Compatibility. Embedded OS's in some devices and things haven't been updated in a very long time. Perhaps some devices like kiosks are even ie8 on XP without any service packs. Generally, who knows what dinosaurs are out there. Also I believe html5 player is a fallback. It's prob less code ...


2

There are many ways you can approach this, here is some that come to mind: Google Search Operators Using Google search and supported operators you should be able to find the adobe flash files, assuming that the sites do not block indexing of those files via headers noindex or robots.txt Use something like this: site:example1.com OR site:example2.com OR ...


2

Googlebot uses code that is custom to Google for converting the HTML pages into text. Google has not released this code, and nobody is sure exactly what they do in all cases. Usually Googlebot just sees the page source and removes the HTML tags. There are many programs that can download the source code of a page (even masquerading as the Googlebot user ...


1

I'm one of the developers responsible for building this Visualizer (it was actually me and one other fellow handling the backend stuff). For anyone interested here are the techniques I had to use to make this project possible. There are no pre-rendered images in the entire visualizer, it actually used Flash to warp a tiled texture with a displacement map, ...


1

It means that somebody could more easily create a malicious ad. Allowing cross-domain ads allows any flash content on the allowed website (ads) to submit any form on your site or read any data from the current logged in user. Depending on your site this could facilitate: Theft of user data Unauthorized use of administrator functionality Automated spam ...


1

You need to check the entire terms and conditions attached to the flash game in question to make sure you have full legal rights to make money off of it. If the game was something you downloaded then uploaded to a server, then look for a file named readme or license or even readme.txt or license.txt to see what the legal rules are with that game. Also ...


1

The main reason is codec support. Even though modern browsers support the most common codecs (H.264, VP8, Theora), the support is inconsistent. For example, VP8 is not supported in IE9 and Safari (due to Apple's involvement in MPEG-LA), Firefox relies on the OS/Hardware for H.264 support, and Theora suffers in both adoption and quality compared to the others....


1

I found a question on Stack Overflow here related to using JavaScript to track Flash objects. It's best if you use onmousedown() like this: <div onmousedown="clickBanner(1)"> <object> <param name="movie" value="3.swf"> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <embed wmode=transparent allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="...


1

If your concern is for compatibility, then you would need to change them to HTML5 - many browsers (particularly mobile) just won't execute flash files any more. If you have the .fla file, then you could try opening it in a newer version of Flash and seeing whether it gives you option to export it. I wouldn't guarantee that it will - Flash 5 is 14 years old ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible