30

There are several reasons to remove extensions from URLs: To make the URLs look cleaner To make URLs easier to type To make URLs easier to remember To make URLs more SEO keyword friendly To be able to change technologies -- if you ever want to move your site from one technology to the other, its easiest to do so without users even knowing if there are no ...


14

The browser isn't looking for a file. It's just asking for a resource. The server then decides what that resource returns. At it's most basic level that "file" is literally just a file. In the case of the default index page of a directory how the server is set up will determine which files is returned. Some servers are configured by default to return index....


14

Your browsers doesn't load any file, it requests a resource which the server then provides at his discretion (lengthy elaboration below). If you type google.com into your browsers toolbar, the browser wil first append a protocol, either http:// or https. Then browser will look up the IP address belonging to google.com, which is 172.217.19.206. Your browser ...


10

From our (Google's) point of view, you can use whatever file names & URL structure that makes sense for your site -- you definitely do not need to fine-tune it on this level for SEO purposes. For Image Search, we recommend using descriptive file names, but even if it's just a number (for example, when a photographer uploads files without modifying the ...


6

Keep the filename including its file extension below 255 characters. Just to be safe. The actual length doesn't really matter. Personally I have never seen a penalty coming from a too long filename. Just don't keyword stuff it! Take into account that some characters have different encodings (such as ä, ö, ü, é, etc.) making your filename actually longer. A ...


6

All web servers have one or more "default files". It's the file that will be displayed whenever a visitor goes to a URL that ends in a slash /, i.e. a folder. If the default file name on your web server is index.php and a visitor goes to www.example.com/pagename/, they are actually accessing www.example.com/pagename/index.php. If there is no trailing /, ...


4

There are several ways to serve files without an extension. One of the easiest is to use the Multiviews option in your .htaccess. That option allows the /webpage.html document to be accessed through the /webpage URI. Then you can use a rewrite rule to make sure that the version with .html gets redirected to the version without the extension. Here is ...


4

This is the type of “cool” URI scheme that I aim for on my own personal website. Personally, the reason that I started to do so (and probably many more web designer/developers too!) was after reading the article “Cool URIs don't change” – this document was written by the World Wide Web's founding father, Tim Berners-Lee. In Tim Berners-Lee's famous article,...


4

That would depend on your webserver configuration. Many webservers do come configured that way. Here is a snippet from /etc/apache2/apache2.conf on my Ubuntu Linux webserver: # # The following lines prevent .htaccess and .htpasswd files from being # viewed by Web clients. # <FilesMatch "^\.ht"> Require all denied </FilesMatch> Your ...


4

I'm wondering how I know what file is being rendered. I can eventually guess it accurately on a long enough timeline by simply explicitly calling on that filename in the URL. www.xyz.com/index.html fail to load anything? Then try www.xyz.com/index.htm and then so on until I get the site to render. I'm just looking for a shortcut to know what file my browser ...


3

It has been verified that a PHP file can be used as a sitemap file such as sitemap.php I checked http://sitemaps.org (the website with the specification information for sitemaps) and there is no mention that the file must be saved in the .XML format. I will have to say that yes, it will work, as long as Google does not have a problem with the extension for ...


3

It is not a good idea from an SEO point of view to serve different content via Javascript since a web-crawler is likely to either see an empty page or always the default content. In either case, your content will not get fully indexed. Serving different content via PHP is doable and some entire sites are served by only a single file. Those sites usually ...


3

Just to clarify... 404 crawl errors are not necessarily a bad thing if the content genuinely does not exist. It is what 404's are for. You will not get penalised for having legitimate 404's. However, in this case it looks as if these are typos in the source URL, or people/search engines are linking to content that has moved. In this case you are potentially ...


3

The key point to understand here is that a URL is an abstract concept. In fact, they should technically be referred to as a URI (Uniform Resource Indicator, rather than Uniform Resource Locator). In short, when a browser or user-agent makes a request to a URI, the server can return any content, with any headers. mysite.com/directory/specific-page/ is OK ...


3

If duplicating the image really is unnecessary then you could still perhaps have the best of both worlds... only store the image once, but have it referenced by different filenames, for the different languages - using mod_rewrite (Apache) and an internal rewrite. Based on unor's example: example.net/img/en/house.png example.net/img/es/casa.png These would ...


3

Image filename is not very important. Because google know perfectly this truth that some Content Management Systems and many custom-made websites do not allow to edit image filenames and many images uploaded with unrelated filenames. Also many Web.2 and social websites, controlled by their users (Not admin) and images uploaded with dirty filenames. So ...


3

TWiki stores content directly in the file system. Look for twiki/data and twiki/pub directories. The twiki/data has directories representing TWiki webs (workspaces). Those webs contain files representing the wiki page data. There is a .txt file with page content, and a .txt,v file with page history. For example, page SlicedBread in the Eng web will be at ...


3

No, the name does not matter. In the Google Search Console (and the Bing version of that, FWIW), you tell it which sitemaps to look at. Other search engines might look for sitemap.xml by default but this is not guaranteed nor standard behavior and doesn't really need to be worried about.


3

Assuming the file name for your single page application is specifically index.html, rather than some other file same, such as single-page-application.html, whether or not you include the file name in your links should have no impact on SEO. I would, however, recommend using https if you aren't already, as this will be beneficial for SEO. https://webmasters....


2

SEO tricks are no longer relevant. Also google discurages those tricks, focusing more on authenticity. So if you want to increase in rank, focus on content, have an adiacent blog to your site, go on social media. I think images, files, domains and URLs should obviously have relevant names and alternatives, but the main focus is the content, and you being ...


2

Two solutions which don't require filename changing but give a different file path: Create different domains which forward to the same directory, where the site then detects language and servers correct paths/site content. e.g. website.es would pull content from website.com so website.com/picture.jpg becomes website.es/picture.jpg Similarly use subdomains ...


2

In my opinion, image file names are one of the most important SEO factors... as long as it's valid and meaningful. Don't take the same exact image and rename it over and over. Don't give an image a deceptive file name. Let's say I have the following images on a website: black-and-white-dog.jpg friendly-orange-male-cat.jpg african-grey-parrot-77-years-old....


2

I personally use a bit of both... I place all the images with a general purposes (things like : design, icons, site content, sprites, etc..) in a single directory. Then for everything related to a single "thing" on my website, by example a .jpg avatar related to a single user, I put that in a specific directory but inside of a centralized structure.. ...


2

I completely agree to all the answers put above. Just adding that one of the reasons why extensions are hidden in URL is to security. Putting it simply, if you don't expose the extension in the URL, it is little hard to figure out the technology on which the application has been built. So lets say a page in made in PHP and the extension is not hidden, then a ...


2

What we know about Google is that they use a system of indicators that tells the search engines what the content is about, there is a limit to how many indicators you can have and after that its ignored upto the point if over used it goes against you in negative SEO. So the path is one of many indicators removing SEF (Search Engine Friendly) urls will not ...


2

No, a filename's location relative to the root does not affect SEO, and it certainly doesn't warrant adding 301 redirects to restructure your site for. As this article discusses, URLs should be easy for humans and search engines to understand. When a URL appears in a search engine snippet, if it's clear to search engine users what the link is to and how it ...


2

I would go with .html. The W3C actually recommends this practice in its CHIPs Note, and for two good reasons: To disguise the technology you are using today To keep your options open on the technology you will use in the future Even Tim Berners-Lee himself recommends not using technology-specific file extensions in his famous article “Cool URIs don't ...


2

When migrating from HTML to WordPress, the main thing to be kept in mind is the permalink structure. By default HTML pages have the extension of .html while WordPress URLs have no extensions. (You can activate them though). Now Google treats a www.example.com/page.html and www.example.com/page as two different URLs. Generally, there are two options: ...


2

Apache and Lighthttpd both have a directory listing mod that you need to enable, often by default these are disabled for security reasons. You can enable indexing by doing the following: Lighthttp To enable directory listings globally: dir-listing.activate = "enable" If you need it only for a directory, use conditionals: $HTTP["url"] =~ "^/download($|/)"...


2

So long as the entries in the sitemap point to the correct URLs and Google knows to access the sitemap file and is doing so, you're fine. The name of that file is not relevant to the SEO. In other words, my sitemap could be www.mysite.com/f*ckyougoogle.xml and neither the spider nor the algorithm would care.


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