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16

It might come from 60 * 60 * 24 * 7 * 4 * 12 = 29030400 where each month consists of exactly 4 weeks.


11

See http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.9.3: The max-age directive on a response implies that the response is cacheable (i.e., "public") unless some other, more restrictive cache directive is also present. It's conceivable (likely?) that there are proxies in the wild which break this but since the only failure mode could be ...


10

She continued hosting the site (with all the back-issues available for free) until the beginning of this year, when she let the hosting lapse and the domain name expire. Was she aware that when it expires anyone can pick up that domain name for any reason? Some people don’t realize that an expired domain will be resold. I also posted to the Security ...


6

As @Evgeniy has already covered in his answer, in order to add HTTP response headers to resources external to your site, you need to copy these resources locally - to a server that you control - so you can send the HTTP response header as part of the HTTP response. However, whether you should do this or not is another matter and each instance should be ...


5

Google considers redirecting content that is no longer available to be "soft 404". They would like to be able to treat the page the same as a 404 page. If you redirect the expired page to your home page, Google will identify it as a soft 404. It will appear in Google Webmaster Tools as an error. Google won't pass the link juice from inbound links to ...


5

The only thing your friend can do to protect themselves is to contact a lawyer trying to assert copyright on the published material.


5

Yes it is possible using Apache and PHP, by setting the expires and cache-control using header(), you can find out more about what is, and what is not supported in the HTTP/1.1 specification. PHP headers will look something like this: $seconds_to_cache = 3600; $ts = gmdate("D, d M Y H:i:s", time() + $seconds_to_cache) . " GMT"; header("Expires: $ts"); ...


3

For domain name history, you can use this tool: https://who.is/domain-history/cnn.com. domaintools.com is better, but paid. PErhaps you can do a trial. Other than that, you can look up the site on archive.org (wayback machine) and scroll through years and months to see their content quality, extended breaks in archives, and if it was redirected.


3

Using a no-cache meta tag is a bad idea. Page caching is valuable for both SEO and user experience. Caching will improve (lower) page load times. This means a user sees the content faster, which reduces abandonment rates - especially on mobile devices. Ideally users will use settings to clear their browser cache, however this cannot be assumed. A preferred ...


2

These headers are used to discourage browsers or proxies from caching the page. For dynamically generated content the headers would be there to try and ensure site visitors are always hitting the server and so are always getting up-to-the minute content. To answer your specific question, these headers may negatively affect performance because they may ...


2

Caching speeds up repeat views and not first time visits so in terms of SEO value it means little since the first view time is the most important factor. Caching is good however because it means when people switch from page to page they are only loading the resources they need so this will boost user experience. Using no-cache will disable the cache and &...


2

It seem it tells browser that the cache expires after 1 year, 31461276 seconds means 1 year. More details in this post: EXPIRES VS. MAX-AGE


2

I think that it would work although with the amount of time spent, you'd be better off guest blogging, writing press releases and making link bait, etc. As even if you got a pr5 site (I know page rank is not such a good measure nowadays but bear with me) you'd just end up with a load of links coming from one domain. You'd be much better off having them come ...


2

The use of 'to cache or no-cache depends on the end performance sort: 1) Affiliate Marketers - need to 'cache tags' when pages etc go to landing pages as the cookies are needed for allocation of funds. 2) Informative/ transformational posts - use of 'non-cache tags' no-cookies as social trust factors are being built.


2

Doing that won't get your sited banned or not indexed by Google, but you might rank better if you optimize for caching, for example browser caching setting expires headers far in the future for static files that don't change too often; Google takes into account how fast your pages are, because they encourage optimizing website speed for better user ...


2

Your best option is to back-order the domain name with a reputable and established Domain Name provider such as 123-reg, GoDaddy, eNom. Obviously there will be a battle as to which provider is quickest at registering once the clock runs out so hopefully you're the only person with it on back-order!


2

No, you can't change the expiry headers for remote files that aren't under your control. The only way you could would be to host them on your own server - however you then remove the advantage of these files being hosted on powerful CDNs and the font files are probably already stored in other user's browser caches. There are work-around methods to use PHP ...


2

The expires header is related to the page, not fragments of it. Lets go over the basics. You send HTML to the browser, all of it or a stream, doesn't matter for the example. The browser receives it and starts parsing it. At the same time, once it starts parsing, all the other linked files are called, like images, css, js, etc. Some parallel connections ...


2

There are a few options in your case: Try to contact the current owner and ask if they want to sell the domain to you. Wait till the domain leaves the domain quarantine period and try to manually buy it. Wait for a domain reseller to buy it and try to buy the domain for an (extremely) high price from this third party. I also have my doubt about services ...


2

Thanks for the trouble-shooting help. I have solved the problem -- by specifying a custom folder for storing temporary session data. Here's how: Locate the folder where your session data files are currently being stored. In my case, the folder was called tmp. The folder name and location may vary, depending on your version of Linux and how it has been set ...


2

No, you aren't able to manage headers of files you don't host by your own. The single way to manage headers of those files you mentioned (google analytics and so on) is to host them locally. In this case you must manage their updates too. In general you can match files in htaccess with their file types, like this: <IfModule mod_expires.c> # Enable ...


2

You cannot change the headers for requests you're not responding to. In this case, the browser will make a request to Google asking for fonts. The browser will receive a response from Google(not you) with headers(cache, encoding, etc) and body(actual resource). Don't forget these tools point you in the right direction but are not always aware of the whole ...


1

"Are there any instances in which a domain could drop/expire and yet the registration listed with Verisign isn't updated to the new registration date?" There is zero probability of that happening. I tend to think the answer to your other question is no, but I will admit that there are a lot of site tools that I don't know about, so it's possible there is ...


1

If the domain is really deleted at the registry (not just expired, it must be completely deleted that is coming at a state when you do whois on it - on the registry whois server, so VeriSign only if it is a .COM or .NET - you would get a message such as "domain does not exist"), and then subsequently released, besides a bug or some very specific cases, the ...


1

As you can see from the whois, the domain has probably just been renewed: Registry Expiry Date: 2019-01-27T00:48:16Z Updated Date: 2018-01-27T15:43:21Z Domain Status: ok https://icann.org/epp#ok Even if the registrar whois does not seem correctly updated (its expiration date is still in the past). The website is not down, it resolves perfectly and ...


1

Expire meta tag will tell google to delete your page from their database, and so on for every page including the expire meta tag, you are basically telling google that the document isn't valid, your SEO will probably suffer. Don't use expire meta tag! Websites that serve free ads eventually get extremely popular, so you should think about an automated ...


1

For the HTML files, you can't have it both ways. The only way for Varnish to always show HTML files if they've changed would be to check every time (=cache miss), at which point you've not gained anything by using it. If your site changes very frequently, setting a short cache time like you have is probably the best you can do (although 3 seconds might be a ...


1

There isn't a 'one size fits all' solution to HTTP caching. The right solution for you depends on your site and the nature of your traffic. E.g. do most of your requests come from repeat visitors, or do people visit your site once and never return? If they are repeat visitors, how frequently do they visit? Are they likely to be checking regularly for ...


1

I'm assuming you want one file to process different CSS based on different parameters. I have a better answer, and as a benefit to this answer, you can have pretty urls instead of requiring a client browser to call actual CSS files. I'm gonna assume a standard LAMP setup (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP) is done on the remote computer. First, ask the server ...


1

You should set your expires for all CSS content by mime type this way: ExpiresByType text/css "access plus 6 months" You could also set the expires just for a single file: <Files css/front.css> ExpiresActive on ExpiresDefault "access plus 6 months" </Files> That would take effect for that file whether or not there are URL parameters ...


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