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In order for Cloudflare to route mail to the correct location, the MX record should point to the server that manages your mail. MX example.com mail.example.com Auto 0 DNS only example.com is where your domain goes while mail.example.com is where the server name required by your mail host goes. Next, if the MX record points to a ...


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NO. Whether or not you have your DNS hosted at your registrar has no bearing whatsoever on how quickly DNS changes propagate. This is classic GoDaddy marketing BS. The only factor under your control that affects propagation time is the DNS records' TTL. The TTL settings available to you depend solely on your DNS provider, not your registrar. As a side note, ...


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For reference I followed the guide https://stackoverflow.com/questions/30167113/redirect-github-pages-to-custom-domain @chad-dupuis suggested. This meant adding rel=canonical link tags and meta refresh tags (with 5 second grace period) to the github pages version of my site, changing any links to articles to the new URL, along with adding a notice at the top ...


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It's been a while since I've configured IIS, but if I recall correctly, the bindings will only identify that the new site is "listening" for the olddomain.com and forward to the active site, without telling your web client anything. On the other hand, if you create a "new site" for the old domain, and use a redirect, then you will also ...


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You cannot achieve this through DNS alone. There are two options: Get cooperation from your podcast provider If your podcast provider is able to host your subdomain for you, you could get the content to appear there. The proceedure would be: You point DNS for your subdomain to their server (mypodcastprovider.example) They configure their server to show ...


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Your SPF record (DNS TXT) looks currently like: "v=spf1 mx include:_spf.google.com include:spf.protection.outlook.com include:servers.mcsv.net ~all" It had previously a direct include of office365.com, and the include statements can be recursive. The client needs to follow all of them. So you may have only 5, but some induce other includes... Like ...


3

A CNAME is not a redirect. When you use a CNAME, the traffic for both domains is sent to the same IP address. The behavior of the site that users see when you use a CNAME record is identical to what users see when you use an A record with the IP address of the other server. The type of DNS record you use has no bearing on how your site behaves. You can'...


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IIS (and other web/application servers) can serve several sites at once from the same IP as long as it can distinguish one site from the others in any request that comes through. To achieve this they should have different IPs or the same IP with at least one domain name associated with it. However, you can have just one site in your server assigned to one IP ...


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All is about DNS, so the config should be done in your google domain DNS manager if this is your case. [If your Name Servers or NS are pointed from google domains dns manager to another, you should perform the actions in the pointed NameServers DNS management] Don't modify the root zone records of your "myname.com", sometimes came with an @ or with ...


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As soon as you change your records, one recursive nameserver can query for it, and hence grab the "bad" value and then cache it, for either its TTL or the negative TTL depending on what is the record and the response exactly. If you did in fact really reload the nameservers with the bad value. Also, there are offline checker. named-checkzone for ...


2

Web resources are located according to their IP address, not the domain name. As you pointed out the A Record is where the website is, there are many other records e.g. the MX record for mail and TXT records for a number of different pieces of information such as SPF information. The problem with this is that we humans are much better at remembering a name ...


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I have my personal blog hosted at gitlab with a custom domain and it is available at both domains after I created the custom domain. I thought it would redirect and perhaps there is a way to do that, but it seems to simply appear at both. There may be some type of fix for that by now, but there is an old forum post discussing javascript solutions to this (...


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I think there's a more basic aspect of name resolution that's being missed here: Your computer doesn't need to know any DNS names in order to perform lookups. A computer's DNS servers are always defined by IP address. In a consumer setting, that usually means the DNS server addresses are retrieved from a DHCP server along with the IP address, netmask, and ...


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Your understanding is correct on the whole (as a minor point of clarification, it's not your computer that will recursively resolve DNS records, it's typically your ISP.) The "missing piece" you're looking for is the glue record, which is a DNS record specifically designed to fix that circular reference. Glue records are DNS records created at the ...


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That is achieved through what it's called a "glue record". The DNS server has both the NS and the corresponding A (and/or AAAA for IPv6) records for the NS entries and serve them "glued" to the NS response. So even if you only ask for the NS records, the DNS would respond with both the NS servers and their IP addresses.


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With DNS, it does not matter if it is an A record (resolve to an IP directly) or a CNAME record (resolves to another domain), the request from the browser will still reference the original hostname test123.example. If done with https, the "destination" server should serve a valid certificate for the "original" server name or it the client ...


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