Hot answers tagged

11

Dmoz is dead so you're wasting your time. There is no timetable to get listed. It could be a day, or more likely, never. And anything in between. It's whenever the editor decides they're going to approve your listing if they ever do at all. But there are a shortage of editors, many editors are slow or absent, and just as many are corrupt and won't list ...


10

All you can do is submit it. There is no way to guarantee that it will get listed. Listing depends on: Whether there is an editor for your category Whether they are active Whether they decide to approve your site DMOZ was a mess not too long ago and is probably worse now that its importance and relevancy has declined severely. I wouldn't have expectations ...


5

I was a DMOZ editor for many years, so let me tell you why it takes forever to get your link into the open directory. Each category has a submission queue of sites that have been submitted to it. To approve a site, an editor must visit that category and approve your listing in the queue. Most categories have a large backlog of submissions and no editor ...


4

DMOZ is shutting its doors on March 14, 2017. This from an announcement currently on the front page. There's not been any other public declaration of the reasons. From what I can glean from the editors forum this was pretty much a surprise and was announced with very short notice. So, the answer to the original question is: Yes it is.


3

A DMOZ listing won't hurt your site for the Penguin algorithm. The links are editorially reviewed. The open directory project doesn't accept any sort of payment for links. You can suggest your own anchor text, but anchor text is rarely keyword rich (if it is, I suggest submitting and update to change it to your brand name). Tons of good sites have dmoz ...


1

I generally peg the approximate value of a topical, low-Pagerank, non-spammy link at about $200 USD. I wouldn't pay more than that for the site in question. There is no clear advantage to DMOZ links compared to other topical, non-spammy links. Google no longer uses them to power the Google Directory or appears to give links from the site any special ...


1

At one point I was very active at Dmoz as an editor. I no let my account lapse and I am no longer active there. In fact, most editors have left, so not many sites get approved anymore. If you still want to get listed, you will need to find a small category with an active editor where your site actually fits. Most categories have an incoming queue of ...


1

Getting listed in the Dmoz directory can take a very long time. 60 days is nothing. In most cases, it can take up to one or two years (assuming you actually get approved). Personally speaking, I don't think that you should worry about it too much. Dmoz has lost its importance over the years and directories are a weak form of link building in this day and age....


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