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14

Mobile to desktop version should be a choice the user initiates. Sometimes the user may want the mobile version due to: 1) A focused and less cluttered experience 2) Faster browsing for low-bandwidth users (e.g. laptop with a 3G connection) 3) Ability to fit on a small screen Whatever the reason, I don't think deciding for your users is right. Let the ...


4

Let the user choose. Few things are more frustrating than being forced to use a lacking mobile site. Consider allowing desktop users to choose mobile as well -- perhaps they're tethering their laptop to their unrooted iPhone and would appreciate the low-bandwidth alternative for their limited data quota. I think you will find the first problem case ...


3

ANY: No. You need to have control on the website. Having said that, tools like semrush, can give you some insight on competition but not quite exact data about mobile vs desktop.


3

AMP is just HTML/CSS/JS, that's why it works in all modern browsers. Browsers don't really "read AMP", they read HTML/CSS/JS because that's what AMP is comprised of. From the AMP documentation: AMP HTML is a subset of HTML for authoring content pages such as news articles in a way that guarantees certain baseline performance characteristics. [...] it ...


3

There's a script called MobileDetect, if checks if the visitor is a user via the browser headers. Requires updating from time to time, but other than that is works very easy: $detect = new Mobile_Detect(); define(IS_MOBILE_USER, $detect->isMobile() && !$detect->isTablet() ); if( $onDesktopSite && IS_MOBILE_USER && !isset($...


3

I don't see why not. The question here is whether you think it will benefit your users or not. Personally speaking, I find it a tad bit annoying whenever I'm brought to the mobile version of a website, even though I'm using a desktop computer. Do note that you should create some sort of URL fragment that can be used whenever you do not want to be redirected (...


3

Like many "compare over time" questions, this is hidden in Google Analytics with "motion charts". Navigate to "Audience" -> "Mobile" -> "Overview" Set the time frame to 1 year Select motion charts using the icon with three dots on the top right of the graph Select the line chart tab that appear at the top of the chart Change the sideways menu from "% New ...


2

You can use the settings tab on your mobile phone to view the desktop version of any website. More info on how to do it: http://www.techtip.org/desktop-version-of-websites/


2

Why do mobile websites not offer an option to view the desktop version? As @HelpingHands suggests, this would seem to be at the discretion of the site owner. There might not be a strong technical argument for not doing this, apart from if they don't know how to do it (see #3 below) or the site is responsive, in which case you're already on the desktop site! ...


2

Originally, I was mistaken and @Max steered me in the right direction. Thanks @Max!! Forever grateful! I apologize in advance for the error and confusion. You do want to link your desktop pages to your mobile pages with canonical links. However, you have to link each page to the corresponding page between the desktop and mobile versions. From mobile: ...


2

While exposed index files isn't a URL-friendly approach, your idea of redirecting to a specific index file based on what the client's device is actually a fabulous start because then search engines (especially google) can understand that you have a desktop and mobile version of your page and google will try to display the most relevant page to the client ...


2

AMP is intended to be a copy of your original page. You should always have a regular HTML version of every page, and consider that the primary copy, the one that most visitors will see - no matter what size screen they're viewing your site on. The AMP version is only intended to be displayed when the visitor is using a mobile device and coming straight from ...


2

The best recommendation that I have is to be as explicit as possible for when you do have a mobile URL and for when you do not. The best method for this is to state this in your sitemap as is indicated in the official Google documentation here: https://developers.google.com/search/mobile-sites/mobile-seo/separate-urls#annotation-in-sitemaps. Per the Google ...


1

Sadly, this is not possible in the browser-based GA interface. The closest you can get is to make a custom report with Users as metric and Day of Week followed by Hour as dimension drilldowns. But this will only get you data, not the heatmap. In order to get heatmap, you need to export data into something else. This article has a tutorial on how to do it ...


1

For pages where you have both desktop and mobile versions of the page: On your example.com page, put a canonical pointing to the example.com page and an alternate pointing to the m.example.com page. On your m.example.com page, put a canonical pointing to the example.com page. For pages where you have only a desktop version: On your example.com page, put a ...


1

You can get mobile vs desktop stats per sector. This article has nice stats per country and per sector. If you website is in one of these sectors you can get a rough idea of mobile usage from similar websites:


1

The article is misleading because it suggests that the server must compress content on the fly for every client and it must compress it each time. That is a waste of cycles. Use the best of both worlds: You compress your images one time as good as possible (pngout, zopflipng, irfanview webjpg plugin) and then you switch off server-side compression for ...


1

Maybe get it done without cookie and saving the state? You decide on every visit with media query based on visitors monitor width, which version to serve, and, beside of this initial decision, implement on both, desktop and mobile, versions a nofollowed link to another version, like "wanna check, how looks our desktop/mobile version?"


1

I'd rather have the information I need from a working desktop site than try to get information from mobile sites that sometimes don't work properly or don't provide enough information. You are saying, then, that the same information isn't available on both and that's not true for every site including all those I work on. I consider that a design and user ...


1

The first issue here as I see it is the misconception that you absolutely must maintain a minimum number of words per page to avoid thin content penalties. This used to be the case a few years back but these days even Google's own advice is don't write a site for Google write it for your consumers. Second matter is that Google fully expects the mobile ...


1

Your set up is actually separate URLs and not "same URL approach", as the URLs are different, they are on a sub domain. "same URL approach" is when your mobile content is dynamically served on the exact same URLs as the desktop content. On the desktop pages add an alternate tag pointing to the mobile URLs: <link rel="alternate" media="only screen and (...


1

I actually did this too. You can use modrewrite rules to check the user agent of the incoming device to see if its a mobile device. I use the data from the scripts at: http://detectmobilebrowsers.com/ When the detection takes place, a cookie must be set for a long lifetime (in your case, use 10 years). Its the cookie that you use that will prevent the ...


1

You can use Google's recommendations for mobile sites. Your first step is in compliance with those recommendations but not the second step. You should always redirect based on user agent detection and not session - but allow users the option to choose (usually as part of the footer). You also need to implement canonical tags (on the mobile pages) and ...


1

According to this article: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/05/testing-for-windows-phone/ As Microsoft acknowledged in the past, the version of Internet Explorer found on mobile devices is similar but not identical to the desktop browser version. There are a few key features that are not available on Windows Phone: HTML5 touch drag-and-drop ...


1

As far as I know, the Internet Explorer found on Windows Phone uses the same engine as the desktop version of IE. I think the only difference between them is the viewport/screen sizes that they'll be viewed on. I think really you can test mobile sites on the desktop version of IE the same way you would with Safari, just resize the screen.


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