Hot answers tagged

5

Technically, you can get sued (at least in the United States). The logo images are owned by social networks. They have copyright on them. You have to have a licence for to use them at all. (Generally, the sites give a licence to use them for social sharing buttons when unaltered.) They generally have policies against modifying the logo images in any way: ...


5

SEO is unconcerned with ANY animations or visual effects except if those animations and effects are the content and subject of the document. Even then, it is the textual content attached to those objects that will affect SEO, not the effects.


4

The information that is below the thumbnail (giving details about the image) is usually just code that is written for each individual thumbnail. You can use LightBox 2 and jQuery to show an image of the thumbnail in front of all of a pages content. It is known as a 'LightBox', you will find many sites that use different variants of this. Almost every one ...


4

You need to convert the "Arimo" font to a web-font with a converter like http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator. Your CSS references the Arimo font. Since the font is not available via CSS, it's attempting to load it locally. Most people won't have Arimo installed, so will see a default font instead.


4

This is a bit tricky to answer. There are obviously some big differences between displaying your page offline to online (in your test server). All URL paths (root-relative, absolute and even relative) are going to be different depending on your setup. Content-Type headers (normally sent from the server) could differ, so files are interpreted differently, etc....


3

Unless a lawyer comes along that knows about the appropriate law in your jurisdiction then all you're going to get is people's opinion. Take a look around on the web, literally countless websites use their own themed social media icons as you say. Unless you're trying to imply some sort of affiliation or endorsement then I don't see what a social media ...


3

They are done by taking a screen shot of your app, and then placing that inside of a device PSD (Photoshop file) template which you can find by just Googling for "device name PSD" - for instance here is a iPhone 5 PSD template.


3

Anytime you're designing something that's going to be responsive, it helps to design multiple viewports. If it's for an existing site, look at analytics to find the most common resolutions people use when viewing your site, and grab the top 3 along with some sample images and text so you can decide when things need to reflow. If you're designing a new site, ...


2

There are many other design communities that you can consider using, these are: Dribbble Red Bubble Visual.ly Cargo Creattica Pikto Chart Image Spark Design Bump UX User Experience I've made this as a Community Wiki so feel free to contribute to the list.


2

If you want to pay for it you may look out for services like: http://www.usertesting.com/ http://www.trymyui.com/ https://www.ui-check.com/ (I can't tell about the quality, just bookmarked them). Also give http://www.behance.net/ a try. If you have a "social network", followers, influencers, you may kindly ask for their feedback and share the designs.


2

I think you may find some good help at User Experience.


2

Apple was quite clever when they released the Retina display along with support at the OS level. They solved the problem of applications looking widely different on standard versus Retina displays. This means that if you design the application without Retina awareness than you do not need to worry about it and it will simply work the same was as on a normal ...


2

Placeit will do it for you. Pretty slick. And free. You could also pay a designer about $5 to insert a screen shot (that's what we did).


2

I would recommend em over px, and I still use em almost everyday for newsletters. The issue with px is large LCD monitors, as monitors get larger and smaller (smartphones), fonts size will have to adjust accordingly. Also its a good option for dated browsers. People still use IE6 etc.


2

If your main content is about the same, just make the switch. Don't give your users two versions of your website. Those are your main concern, Google will follow the users. Moving your old site to a new directory makes even less sense: you have a PR per page, or actually per URL. If you change /some-page to /backup/some-page, you will lose that the PR and ...


2

First of all I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. According to the US Patent Office (http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html): Section 107 contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 ...


2

If you are completely changing the structure, theme of your website, my advice is: Do not make all the changes together. Googlebot and users do not like websites that are completely changed. For example you might have a blog and 100 direct readers. Your readers know the structure of your website, they know that on the right top there are the popular posts, ...


2

This is called an ellipsis. It's a Greek word which essentially means "truncating text." In situations where the entire text of the article is loaded anyway, the primary purpose for the ellipsis is to get their advertiser's ads closer to the top of the screen. And if you accidentally click on the ads when trying to "read more" I'm sure they don't mind.


2

Actually, responsive web design is really easy to implement in this day and age. Gone are the days when you needed to design two different sites, or compromise on your overall layout to make everyone happy. With media queries in your css code, you can easily design things so that your visitors with desktop displays are still seeing the exact same site they'...


2

If you aren't going to enforce a copyright claim, don't use a copyright mark. Instead you could put something like source: x.com


1

Usually but not always, when you land to an article through a social media link, the reason of popping up a "Continue reading" button is that you confirm (in a camouflaged way) to give access in background scripts to run through you browser. Sometimes the very same button is popping up with a text ad which urges your attention. Furthermore to your initial ...


1

The only way to make an unicode icon display across browsers consistently is by loading the icon's default webfont. For example, the electric light bulb unicode character uses the Symbola font. If that isn't installed on the device, the device will then use the fall-back of the fonts you listed. For a cross-platform solution, you'll need to use font icons ...


1

No, because you do not have access to Google's cookies. You only have access to the cookies your website sets. Fortunately there are ways to get this language yourself using JavaScript.


1

You can use portrait and landscape which will detect if the resolution is longer in width or longer in height, but generally its best to use a set of media queries to break down the most common type of devices. Ideally your website should be using widths and heights using percentages rather than pixel based elements, this will allow your website to adapt to ...


1

At first I thought you were asking something only suited for stackoverflow.com but since this is a forum for webmasters, part of your question allows me to give an answer. Go for pagination and use categories. Trying to put a ton of items all on one page of the site can be a disaster especially when the number of items are in the thousands or more. If ...


1

To code! I think you will have greater flexibility if you utilize html/CSS and then use images only when necessary.


1

Ok I have the answer to this. In the ad editor, you can click Text Ad Styles and there is an option for changing the font and size. I did not remember those. They were set to "Optimal", but it doesn't say how it determines what is optimal! Obviously it is not optimal. So I changed it to small font size and they appear better.


1

I agree with Martijn. You say and inconspicuous link for web crawlers. That sounds like a good idea but let's say that when a user searches Google your old content is more relevant than the new for whatever reason. Then the user will be clicking on a link that takes them to the old design with old information. If this is acceptable to you then I say ...


1

you can design your website that will run in a web browser. There are many web browsers that people use, and on many operating systems. People will view your website in the manner that suits them, not you. If they use a windows 8 metro app browser to view your website, your design can be proper metro style. Otherwise it will be a windows 8 style web ...


1

To start I would make sure with a very simple PHP file and try with <?php echo "Hello world!"; ?> and <?p echo "Hello world!"; ?> Make sure you don't have any new line after the closing quote ?>. This are silly error that can make you waste lots of time. Then start to introduce new functionality one by one until your server ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible